41

Given this component:

import React from 'react'
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom'
import PropTypes from 'prop-types'

const NewGoalInput = props => {
  return (
    <input type="text" onKeyUp={handleKeyUp}/>
  )
}

const handleKeyUp = (e) => {
  if (e.key === "Enter") {
    // TODO Add goal
  }
}

export default NewGoalInput

How do I add a constructor where I can define the state without using the extends React.Component syntax?

1
  • 2
    Functional components don't have life cycle workflow implemented, although they don't have a state. If you desire to use the state, you have to extend from React.Component
    – Ematipico
    Commented May 30, 2017 at 13:43

8 Answers 8

37

Since it's a stateless component it doesn't have the component lifecycle. Therefor you can't specify a constructor.

You have to extend React.Component to create a stateful component which then will need a constructor and you'll be able to use the state.

Update Since React 16.8.0 and Hooks got introduced there are more options.

Hooks are a new feature proposal that lets you use state and other React > features without writing a class. They are released in React as a part of > v16.8.0

Stateless:

import React from "react"

const Stateless = ({name}) => (
  <div>{`Hi ${name}`}</div>
);

Stateful:

Has access to component lifecycle methods and local state.

class Stateful extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      count: 0
    };
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    const { count } = this.state;
    document.title = `You've clicked ${count} times.`;
  }

  componentDidUpdate() {
    const { count } = this.state;
    document.title = `You've clicked ${count} times.`;
  }

  render() {
    const { count } = this.state;
    return (
      <div>
        <p>You've clicked {count} times.</p>
        <button onClick={() => this.setState({ count: count + 1 })}>
          Click me
        </button>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

Using Hooks:

Able to use State Hook and Effect Hook.

If you’re familiar with React class lifecycle methods, you can think of useEffect Hook as componentDidMount, componentDidUpdate, and componentWillUnmount combined.

import React, { useState, useEffect } from "react";

const UsingHooks = () => {
  const [count, setCount] = useState(0);

  // Similar to componentDidMount and componentDidUpdate:
  useEffect(() => {
    // Update the document title using the browser API
    document.title = `You've clicked ${count} times.`;
  });

  return (
    // <> is a short syntax for <React.Fragment> and can be used instead of a wrapping div
    <>
      <p>You've clicked {count} times.</p>
      <button onClick={() => setCount(count + 1)}>
        Click me
      </button>
    </>
  );
}
1
  • 3
    Awesome explanation. However, this does not totally answer the question since constructor isn't really part of the lifecycle methods, this means the useEffect hook does not help with constructor creation in functional components.
    – Olumide
    Commented Oct 6, 2021 at 11:00
15

Now that we have useState and hooks the answers are kind of out of date. I came across this question because I was doing something wrong. Here's some simplified code of what I was doing.

// set an initial state
const [ value, setValue ] = useState(0)

// gets called after component is re-rendered
useEffect(() => {
   // callback to parent that set props
   props.update()
})

// if we have an existing value passed in
if (props.value) {
   setValue(props.value)
}

This code was converted from a stateful class to a function using hooks, originally setting the default props in the constructor - but functions don't have constructors and that check happens every time the component re-renders:

  1. calls useState
  2. triggers re-render
  3. useEffect is triggerd
  4. parent is called which sets the props
  5. props update so child renders again
  6. GOTO 1

As you can see this results in an infinite loop. The solution is really quite simple. Here's a mock diff from the original.

- const [ value, setValue ] = useState(0)
+ const [ value, setValue ] = useState(props.value || 0)

- if (props.value) {
-   setValue(props.value)
- }

Basically, just initialise the state from the props and don't do silly things like calling useState except in response to an event or callback of some type.

0
9

You can use useMemo hook (as below) to demonstrate as constructor for functional component. Somebody suggested to use useEffect but it will be invoked after render.

useMemo(() => {
  console.log('This is useMemo')
}, []);
3

you could set a useState as the first line inside of your functional component and add a function as "initial value":

const MyComponentName = props => {
  useState(() => {
    console.log('this will run the first time the component renders!');
  });
  return <div>my component!</div>;
};
1
  • And if you need to expose any value from your "constructor" to the component, remember the returning from this function is the first item in the array returned by useState, this way: const [value] = useState(() => { /* ... */ return '123'; }) Commented Sep 15, 2020 at 13:05
2

You don't. The kind of component in your example is called "stateless functional component". It has no state and no lifecycle methods. If you want your component to be stateful you'll have to write it as a class component.

1
  • 3
    The modern version(s) of React has the ability to manage state in functional components using hooks and this makes your answer outdated.
    – Olumide
    Commented Oct 6, 2021 at 10:59
2

For those who want to run a function once before the component is mounted, here is a hook (written in TypeScript).

Normally useEffect and useLayoutEffect suffice, but they run after the component is mounted, and sometimes you want to run code before that happens (like a constructor).

import React, { useRef } from "react";

function useOnce<Type>(callBack: () => Type): Type {
  const result = useRef<Type | null>(null);

  if (result.current !== null) {
    return result.current;
  }

  result.current = callBack();
  return result.current;
}

const Component: React.FC<{}> = () => {
  const result = useOnce(() => {/* Code you would normally put in a constructor */});

  return <div />
}
1

To simulate constructor in FC use useEffect.

useEffect(() => {
  ... here your init code
}, []);

That's it! EZ! This useEffect runs only once when the component loads and never runs after, just don't forget to add square brackets at the end.

4
  • Thanks! Learned something. Commented Nov 19, 2019 at 12:34
  • 7
    useEffect hooks run after the render function, so they do not serve the same function as a constructor even if you pass the second parameter ("square brackets"). a constructor in a class component runs before even the first render call Commented Mar 1, 2020 at 20:16
  • 2
    Timofey is right. useEffect() does mimic componentDidMount - not a constructor. You can't use it to set initial data that should be rendered afterwards like this would be done in a classed based constructor.
    – mogio
    Commented Mar 24, 2020 at 16:24
  • Its not the replacement of constructor, its the replace componenetDidMount Commented Nov 16, 2021 at 6:12
0

Alternatively, you can use react-afc

import { afc, reactive } from 'react-afc'

function heavyCalc() {/*...*/}

const Conponent = afc(props => {
  // Called once, before the first render

  const state = reactive({
    name: 'Stack',
    inputsCount: 0
  })

  // Without useMemo(..., [])
  const result = heavyCalc()

  // The function is created once and does not cause
  // a re-render of child components
  function onInput(e) {
    state.inputsCount++
    state.name = e.currentTarget.value
  }

  // Saved between renders (no longer need useRef)
  let rendersCount = 0

  // Must return the render-function
  return () => {
    // The function works like a regular react-component
    // Here you can use the usual hooks
    rendersCount++
    return (
      <input onChange={onInput} value={state.name}/>
    )
  }
})

The package has the necessary methods for working with state (including redux), react-hooks, lifecycle methods and context

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