7

TL;DR: How can you use SCSS to have CSS variables with a fallback for older browsers.

I'm trying to make sense of this article. In my opinion, you have to already be an advanced SASS user to understand it, which I'm not. To make matters worse, it's the only article I found on the subject.

Here is what I'm trying to achieve:

My scss should be along the lines of :

body {
  @include v(background-color, primary)
}

then the processed CSS should be

body{
   background: yellow; /* Yellow being defined above as the primary color */
   background: var(--color-primary);
}

By playing around a bit, I can already get the value of the CSS variable like so:

$colors: (
  primary: yellow,
);

:root {
  @each $name, $color in $colors {
    --color-#{$name}: $color;
  }
}

@mixin background-color($color_) {
  background: var(--color-#{$color_});
}

To use it:

body{
  @include background-color(primary);
}

Which will result in this:

body {
    background: var(--color-primary);
    /* But the fallback is missing :(, I tried  things with the map-get but it's really eluding me... */
}
  • Sorry for asking but what is the purpose of using variables at all if each var is followed by its literal value for "browser compatibility"? – caiosm1005 Nov 21 '18 at 21:48
  • @caiosm1005 The variable will be used on newer browsers so the value is the same as the normal value when you use vars without fallback. When you develop the variable will also be used and it's only at compile time that the literal value is inserted. By the way, it's not followed by its literal value, the literal value is preceding it, which is the point (else there would be no use indeed). – Ced Nov 22 '18 at 8:37
  • Yup, meant preceding. My bad. Still, if there is literal value, there is no need for variables in this case. I understand it's automatically generated by a preprocessor, but the result will be identical without the var statements and the stylesheet would become cleaner. – caiosm1005 Nov 22 '18 at 16:59
  • @caiosm1005 what's your use of using variables at all then? The difference here is that you can change style app wide at runtime and you can use css vars in your code. Both of those are pretty neat features for some people. – Ced Nov 23 '18 at 15:16
9

If you're using Sass, you can automate fallbacks through a Sass mixin. Create a map of your CSS variable names and their values, and then you can look up those values in a mixin that outputs the fallback style and the preferred one

$vars: (
  primary: yellow,
);

:root {
  --primary: map-get($vars, primary);
}

@mixin var($property, $varName) {
  #{$property}: map-get($vars, $varName);
  #{$property}: var(--#{$varName});
}

The above mixin is used like so:

body {
  @include var(background-color, primary);
}

and outputs the following CSS:

:root {
  --primary: yellow;
}

body {
  background-color: yellow;
  background-color: var(--primary);
}

Et voilà :)

  • 2
    nice, by the way, some postCSS plugins does this automatically (It's called custom properties if I recall correctly). I ended up using that as it was way more convenient – Ced Feb 11 '18 at 17:40
  • 1
    Au fait: Bonjour depuis la belgique :) – Ced Feb 11 '18 at 17:42
  • 1
    FYI you need to interpolate map-get, so --primary: #{map-get($vars, primary)}; – Jan Aug 29 '18 at 13:49
  • this is actually way better than my answer I accept that one instead after a year :D – Ced Sep 5 '18 at 21:14
10

Update: Postcss Custom properties can do fallback and is way easier than the below code

step 1: declare scss variables

So first of all we want to put some variables in a $map, I'll go with color variables:

$colors: (
  primary: #FFBB00,
  secondary: #0969A2
);

step 2: automate css 4 var generation

// ripped CSS4 vars out of color map
:root {
  // each item in color map
  @each $key, $value in $colors {
    --colors-#{$key}: $value;
  }
}

What happens in root is : for each key and value in the colors map, we print the followng :

--colors-#{$key}: $value;

Which corresponds to css variable declarations. I believe the weird bit with #{} around the key is to not have spaces around the value. Thus the result is:

--colors-primary: #FFBB00,
--colors-secondary: #0969A2

Note that the prefix (--colors-) is the same name as the scss color map above it. The why will become clear in last step.


step 3: Plenty of maps !

$props: (
  background-color: $colors
);

$map-maps: (
  background-color: colors
);

Here we add the map $props which maps a css property to the map containing the values. background-color will hold color, so the correct map is $colors.

map-maps is a copy of props where instead of the map we have the name of said map. (this is relative to the note in step 2).

Step 4 : let's make it work !

@mixin v($prop, $var) {
  // get the map from map name
  $map: map-get($props, $prop);
  // fallback value, grab the variable's value from the map
  $var-fall: map-get($map, $var);
  // our css4 variable output
  $var-output: var(--#{$map}-#{$var});    
  #{$prop}: $var-fall;
  // css4 variable output
  #{$prop}: $var-output;
}

body{
  @include v(background-color, primary);
}

I simplified the code in the article quite a bit, it still works, for this example at least, the code in the article takes more into account.

Anyhow, here is what happens.

First, we call the mixin with:

  @include v(background-color, primary);

Then upon entering,

 $map: map-get($props, $prop); // map-get($props, background-color)

we have a variable called $map to which we assign the value that is inside the $props map at the key background-color which happen to be the $colors map. It's a bit of a maze but it's not that complicated once you resolve it.

Then for the fallback:

 $var-fall: map-get($map, $var);

This simply gets the value of the map we just got (which is $colors) at the $var key (which happens to be primary). Thus the result is #FFBB00.

For the css var

  $map-name: map-get($map-maps, $prop);
  $var-output: var(--#{$map-name}-#{$var});

we recreate what we did to generate the var in the @each loop


Whole code would be :

$colors: (
  primary: #FFBB00,
  secondary: #0969A2
);

// ripped CSS4 vars out of color map
:root {
  // each item in color map
  @each $name, $color in $colors {
    --colors-#{$name}: $color;
  }
}



$props: (
  background-color: $colors,
  color:            $colors
);

$map-maps: (
  background-color: colors
);



@mixin v($prop, $var) {
  // get the map from map name
  $map: map-get($props, $prop);
  // fallback value, grab the variable's value from the map
  $var-fall: map-get($map, $var);
  // our css4 variable output

  $map-name: map-get($map-maps, $prop);
  $var-output: var(--#{$map-name}-#{$var});

  #{$prop}: $var-fall;
  // css4 variable output
  #{$prop}: $var-output;
}

body{
  @include v(background-color, primary);
}

Now this is a simplification of what is done in the article. You should check it out to have code a bit more robust.

  • This answer would be much better with a demo – Zach Saucier May 31 '17 at 12:34
  • 1
    This answer is also unnecessarily complex, both in the code and in the explanation's length. – Zach Saucier May 31 '17 at 12:40
  • @ZachSaucier feel free to post your own – Ced Aug 21 '17 at 16:54
  • The logic is good, thanks for the share and the explanation. I propose my own version because i think it can be simplified. Please see the above post => stackoverflow.com/questions/44271920/… – rdhainaut Feb 10 '18 at 9:35
  • 1
    Just wow, do not use this in production. Clever but over-engineered and unnecessary. Always prefer readability over magic. You'll thank me in a few years. – Kugel Feb 16 '18 at 1:42
1

I assume you are aware of the reason why it didn't show the fallback. But since it's an answer I will explain the reasons

The current mixin block has only one background property which makes the sass compiler to generate only one property. I don't think sass can identify whether 'var' is supported in browser or not. So, we have to explicitly specify if we need the fallback.

Since you already have the map all you need is to get the value by giving the key 'primary'

 @mixin background-color($color_) {
      background: var(--color-#{$color_});  
      background: map-get($colors, primary);
    }

This will add the background: yellow to the body class always. Alternatively if you want to control the addition of the fallback based on condition. You can do like this

@mixin background-color($color_, $showFall) {
  background: var(--color-#{$color_});  
  @if $showFall {
    background: map-get($colors, primary);
  }
}

and call like this

body{
  @include background-color(primary, true);
}

Code pen for the same https://codepen.io/srajagop/pen/xdovON

Note: I am writing the answer under the assumption that you want only the background-color to work and not all the other properties like mentioned in that post. For that you need to create a proper data structure

  • Thanks. Indeed I understood why it didn't show, your answer however permitted me to understand the whole article. Since my question was about @include v(background-color, primary) and I feel like it can benefit future readers, I'm gonna answer it by explaining how he does it. However, if you do want to do that as well I'll accept your answer, if not I'll accept mine. Just a head's up. – Ced May 30 '17 at 23:12
  • my time's up for today. Please go ahead and answer the question – karthick May 30 '17 at 23:35
  • Good explanation. My plus one – karthick May 31 '17 at 0:03
  • 1
    Make sure to place the fallback before the variable or else the "fallback" will always be used instead! – Zach Saucier May 31 '17 at 12:33

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