On StackOverflow and on the net in general, there are outdated and few guides on how to add a specific folder to the Windows 10 Path environment variable of the user.

I think a complete guide for new developers with step by step instructions and screenshots could be really usefull to help them executing utilities from a Command Prompt without the need of the full path, simplifying the things.

up vote 13 down vote accepted

For the guide below we want to add an example utility called mytool.exe which is located in C:\Users\NewFolderInPath\mytool.exe, so that everytime i want to execute the mytool utility i don't have to specify the full path.

I used this as an example, you can replace the folder with something more realistic like the JDK bin directory located here C:\Program Files\Java\{JDK_VERSION}\bin to execute javac, keytool or everything you want.

Step 1 - Click on the Windows icon

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Step 2 - Click on the Settings icon

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Step 3 - Click on System

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Step 4 - Click on About

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Step 5 - Click on System info

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Step 6 - Click on Advanced system settings

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Step 7 - Click on Environment variables...

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Step 8 - Select Path row and then click Edit

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Step 9 - Click New and then click Browse, then in the next panel which will open you need to select the folder you want in the Path. For the initial premise of this guide i will add the folder C:\Users\NewFolderInPath

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Step 10 - Click OK and click every OK button you will encounter to close every previous windows.

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Step 11 - Open a command prompt (cmd) and now you can execute your utility without specifying the full path.

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NOTE : For every problems leave a comment below and i will answer as soon as i can. Good luck and happy coding :)

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