5

What is the most fast way to calculate function like

# here x is just a number
def f(x):
    if x >= 0:
        return np.log(x+1)
    else:
        return -np.log(-x+1)

One possible way is:

# here x is an array
def loga(x)
    cond = [x >= 0, x < 0]
    choice = [np.log(x+1), -np.log(-x+1)
    return np.select(cond, choice)

But seems numpy goes through array element by element. Is there any way to use something conceptually similar to np.exp(x) to achieve better performance?

2
  • Did either of the posted solutions work for you? – Divakar Jun 2 '17 at 3:50
  • @Divakar sorry, I haven't possibility to check if yet. I will try in the nearest time and mark an answer – ichernob Jun 2 '17 at 4:17
6
    def f(x):
        return (x/abs(x)) * np.log(1+abs(x))
3
  • Nice! This works. Good job on the math. Together with numexpr and/or re-using abs(x) should be the winner. – Divakar May 31 '17 at 6:44
  • 2
    I suggest using numpy.sign(x) rather than x/abs(x), to avoid a possible division by zero. np.copysign(np.log(1 + abs(x)), x) would be another way. – Mark Dickinson May 31 '17 at 6:47
  • All this is pretty good. But functions like abs(), np.sign() can return 0. Marks solution is really nice, however, I would like to find solution faster than np.tanh(x). Is it possible? – ichernob Jun 6 '17 at 6:27
3

In cases like these, masking helps -

def mask_vectorized_app(x):
    out = np.empty_like(x)
    mask = x>=0
    mask_rev = ~mask
    out[mask] = np.log(x[mask]+1)
    out[mask_rev] = -np.log(-x[mask_rev]+1)
    return out

Introducing numexpr module helps us further.

import numexpr as ne

def mask_vectorized_numexpr_app(x):
    out = np.empty_like(x)
    mask = x>=0
    mask_rev = ~mask

    x_masked = x[mask]
    x_rev_masked = x[mask_rev]
    out[mask] = ne.evaluate('log(x_masked+1)')
    out[mask_rev] = ne.evaluate('-log(-x_rev_masked+1)')
    return out

Inspired by @user2685079's post and then using the logarithmetic property : log(A**B) = B*log(A), we can push in the sign into the log computations and this allows us to do more work with numexpr's evaluate expression, like so -

s = (-2*(x<0))+1 # np.sign(x)
out = ne.evaluate('log( (abs(x)+1)**s)')

Computing sign using comparison gives us s in another way -

s = (-2*(x<0))+1

Finally, we can push this into the numexpr evaluate expression -

def mask_vectorized_numexpr_app2(x):
    return ne.evaluate('log( (abs(x)+1)**((-2*(x<0))+1))')

Runtime test

Loopy approach for comparison -

def loopy_app(x):
    out = np.empty_like(x)
    for i in range(len(out)):
        out[i] = f(x[i])
    return out

Timings and verification -

In [141]: x = np.random.randn(100000)
     ...: print np.allclose(loopy_app(x), mask_vectorized_app(x))
     ...: print np.allclose(loopy_app(x), mask_vectorized_numexpr_app(x))
     ...: print np.allclose(loopy_app(x), mask_vectorized_numexpr_app2(x))
     ...: 
True
True
True

In [142]: %timeit loopy_app(x)
     ...: %timeit mask_vectorized_numexpr_app(x)
     ...: %timeit mask_vectorized_numexpr_app2(x)
     ...: 
10 loops, best of 3: 108 ms per loop
100 loops, best of 3: 3.6 ms per loop
1000 loops, best of 3: 942 µs per loop

Using @user2685079's solution using np.sign to replace the first part and then with and without numexpr evaluation -

In [143]: %timeit np.sign(x) * np.log(1+abs(x))
100 loops, best of 3: 3.26 ms per loop

In [144]: %timeit np.sign(x) * ne.evaluate('log(1+abs(x))')
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.66 ms per loop
5
  • Can you add mine to your timings, please? – piRSquared May 31 '17 at 7:19
  • 1
    @piRSquared I don't have numba. Mind adding mine into yours? – Divakar May 31 '17 at 7:19
  • Added the latest app2 – piRSquared May 31 '17 at 7:24
  • @piRSquared Just making sure - You used the latest one that's one-liner, right? – Divakar May 31 '17 at 7:55
  • Yes, I've included the function definitions in my answer to remove ambiguity. – piRSquared May 31 '17 at 8:00
2

Using numba

Numba gives you the power to speed up your applications with high performance functions written directly in Python. With a few annotations, array-oriented and math-heavy Python code can be just-in-time compiled to native machine instructions, similar in performance to C, C++ and Fortran, without having to switch languages or Python interpreters.

Numba works by generating optimized machine code using the LLVM compiler infrastructure at import time, runtime, or statically (using the included pycc tool). Numba supports compilation of Python to run on either CPU or GPU hardware, and is designed to integrate with the Python scientific software stack.

The Numba project is supported by Continuum Analytics and The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (Grant GBMF5423).

from numba import njit
import numpy as np

@njit
def pir(x):
    a = np.empty_like(x)
    for i in range(a.size):
        x_ = x[i]
        _x = abs(x_)
        a[i] = np.sign(x_) * np.log(1 + _x)
    return a

Accuracy

np.isclose(pir(x), f(x)).all()

True

Timing

x = np.random.randn(100000)

# My proposal
%timeit pir(x)
1000 loops, best of 3: 881 µs per loop

# OP test
%timeit f(x)
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.26 ms per loop

# Divakar-1
%timeit mask_vectorized_numexpr_app(x)
100 loops, best of 3: 2.97 ms per loop

# Divakar-2
%timeit mask_vectorized_numexpr_app2(x)
1000 loops, best of 3: 621 µs per loop

Function definitions

from numba import njit
import numpy as np

@njit
def pir(x):
    a = np.empty_like(x)
    for i in range(a.size):
        x_ = x[i]
        _x = abs(x_)
        a[i] = np.sign(x_) * np.log(1 + _x)
    return a

import numexpr as ne

def mask_vectorized_numexpr_app(x):
    out = np.empty_like(x)
    mask = x>=0
    mask_rev = ~mask

    x_masked = x[mask]
    x_rev_masked = x[mask_rev]
    out[mask] = ne.evaluate('log(x_masked+1)')
    out[mask_rev] = ne.evaluate('-log(-x_rev_masked+1)')
    return out

def mask_vectorized_numexpr_app2(x):
    return ne.evaluate('log( (abs(x)+1)**((-2*(x<0))+1))')


def f(x):
    return (x/abs(x)) * np.log(1+abs(x))
2
  • My latest app2 is a bit diferent :) Sorry for the trouble. Could you update? Don't think you need to list those again. – Divakar May 31 '17 at 8:02
  • 1
    @Divakar no trouble :-). That latest one is really fast. – piRSquared May 31 '17 at 8:05
1

You can slightly improve the speed of your second solution by using np.where instead of np.select:

def loga(x):
    cond = [x >= 0, x < 0]
    choice = [np.log(x+1), -np.log(-x+1)]
    return np.select(cond, choice)

def logb(x):
    return np.where(x>=0, np.log(x+1), -np.log(-x+1))

In [16]: %timeit loga(arange(-1000,1000))
10000 loops, best of 3: 169 µs per loop

In [17]: %timeit logb(arange(-1000,1000))
10000 loops, best of 3: 98.3 µs per loop

In [18]: np.all(loga(arange(-1000,1000)) == logb(arange(-1000,1000)))
Out[18]: True

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