10

here is the some sample line of codes..

if(loc > 0 || cat > 0 || price > 0 || jsBed <= bedroom || jsBuilt >= built) {    
 /// Condition to checn all true
    return true;
} else if(loc < 0 || cat > 0 || price > 0 || jsBed <= bedroom || jsBuilt >= built) { 
   /////// 1 false other are true 

} else if(loc > 0 || cat < 0 || price > 0 || jsBed <= bedroom || jsBuilt >= built) { 

}

How to handle these condition. if i have 5 statement. Then it must be almost 12+ condition one by one.. if i am checking all the 5 combinations its going to more lines of code do we have any better option to check all the conditions.

  • 5
    From the 3 above you're repeating the last 3 checks, you could check them once and nest an if statement if for the remainder. – Jay Gould May 31 '17 at 7:03
  • So you want to have an if-elseif-else branch with all possibilities of those variables? price > 0 || jsBed <= bedroom || jsBuilt >= built appears duplicate. Not sure if you want to check eg jsBed > bedroom ? – KarelG May 31 '17 at 7:04
  • 1
    Are you trying to find the total number of conditions met? (2nd and 3rd condition should be treated the same)? Or do you have different implementations depending on which condition is met? – Alexandru Severin May 31 '17 at 7:27
  • 2
    Based on the comments, you want to use AND && instead or OR || – Kruga May 31 '17 at 12:02
12

If you treat a boolean expression as an integer in javascript, it will evaluate to 0 (for false) or 1 (for true). So you could sum the conditions and then use a switch-case construct to check how many were true:

var numTrue = 
   (loc > 0) + (cat > 0) + (price > 0) + (jsBed <= bedroom) + (jsBuilt >= built);

switch(numTrue) {
    case 0:
        // do something if no condition is met
        break;
    case 1:
        // do something else if one condition is met
        break;
    // etc...
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    It's looks reasonable.. I am thinking about it.. Thanks @Mureinik – M Arfan May 31 '17 at 7:11
  • @MArfan As per given information, this is one of the best solution, but if there are any other combinations, please add them to question. There can be other approaches that can help. – Rajesh May 31 '17 at 7:16
  • 6
    So loc=0,cat=1 is treated as loc=1,cat=0. This does not solve OP's example. It only checks the total number of met condition. – Alexandru Severin May 31 '17 at 7:17
  • 2
    Actually, I might be wrong, this might be what OP was looking for although its not clearly stated. – Alexandru Severin May 31 '17 at 7:28
  • If you want to be able to check a specific condition, just shift the tests by an increasing value, for example : var numTrue = (loc > 0) + ( (cat > 0) << 1) + ( (price > 0) << 2) + ( (jsBed <= bedroom) << 3) + ( (jsBuilt >= built) << 4); – Loufylouf May 31 '17 at 15:32
4

You have condition that will never be met :

if(loc > 0 || cat > 0 || price > 0 || jsBed <= bedroom || jsBuilt >= built){    
    /// Condition to checn all true
    return true;
} else if(loc < 0 || cat > 0 || price > 0 || jsBed <= bedroom || jsBuilt >= built) { 
/////// 1 false other are true 

} else if(loc > 0 || cat < 0 || price > 0 || jsBed <= bedroom || jsBuilt >= built) { 

}

Basically :

  • On the second else if, the condition cat > 0 || price > 0 || jsBed <= bedroom || jsBuilt >= built is useless ebcause already met in the first one. Since you use an else if they will have already enter in the first if. So the only one that matter is loc < 0.
  • Same for last elseif only cat < 0 is relevant.

So it can be rewritten to

if(loc > 0 || cat > 0 || price > 0 || jsBed <= bedroom || jsBuilt >= built){    
    /// Condition to checn all true
    return true;
} else if(loc < 0) { 
/////// 1 false other are true 

} else if(cat < 0) { 

}

This answer assume that the code provided is the one that you're trying to simplify and not a generic sample.

Note : I think you may have not written what you wanted to do, forgetting some AND instead of OR.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    That's what I was thinking after I read the question, "That's a lot of useless checks." – Kevin May 31 '17 at 12:41
  • @Walfrat. I appreciate your effort. I want to return true only if my condition match. Once match it will not move forward.. Because we know in JavaScript once return true or false. thanks – M Arfan May 31 '17 at 12:45
  • i think it will reduce the checks. and condition remain as it is. – M Arfan May 31 '17 at 12:47
2

5 conditions is 2**5, i.e. 32 combinations.

If you want to check for various combination, without repeating the tests, you can bit-shift the individual results and combine them for a switch statement. working with the numbers directly is succinct but not very readable

var loc=1,cat=0,price=0,jsBed=1,bedroom=0,jsbuilt=0,built=1;

let results=[loc > 0,cat > 0,price > 0,jsBed <= bedroom,jsbuilt >= built];
let bits=results.reduce( (accum,current,index)=>accum+(current<<index), 0);
switch(bits){
case 0: // none
 break;
case 3: // first two
 break;
case 4: // third one
 break;
}

modifying this to use constants would make the switch statement more readable

var loc=0,cat=1,price=0,jsBed=1,bedroom=0,jsbuilt=0,built=1;

const locBit=1<<0;
const catBit=1<<1;
const priceBit=1<<2;
const bedBit=1<<3;
const builtBit=1<<4;
let bits=( loc > 0 )*locBit |
         ( cat > 0 )*catBit |
         ( price > 0 )*priceBit |
         ( jsBed <= bedroom )*bedBit |
         ( jsbuilt >= built )*builtBit;
switch(bits){
  case 0:
      console.log("!loc,!cat,!price,!bed,!built");
      break;
  case catBit|locBit:
      console.log("loc,cat,!price,!bed>!built");
      break;
  default:
      console.log(bits);
}

you could use constants to help

| improve this answer | |
1

edit1: modified for javascript, not java. Oops...

I'm not sure if you want to see all combinations, but you can group them by introducing an numeric value for each possible output.

Concretely there are 5 variables and 2 options each variable? I've setup a table with numbers in binary representation. If there are > 2 options each(or at some) variable you have to use numbers (base 10). You can use binary values like

const locVal  = (loc > 0 ? 0x1 : 0x0) << 0;
const catVal  = (cat < 0 ? 0x1 : 0x0) << 1;
const priceVal= (price < 0 ? 0x1 : 0x0) << 2;
ect

So you can group them in a method:

function foo(trueCond, level) {
    return (trueCond ? 0b1 : 0b0) << level;
}

which makes

const locVal  = foo(loc > 0, 0);
const catVal  = foo(cat > 0, 1);
const priceVal= foo(price > 0, 2)

(I have omitted the other vars...) Then add up the binary values

const total = locVal + catVal + priceVal

Then you now have to use a switch case statement like

switch (total) {
    case 0: // all options negative
    case 1: // only loc is positive
    case 2: // only cat is positive
    case 3: // both loc and cat is positive
    ect
}

The values in the case represents the integer value of the binary sequence present in total. It has to be noted that it is extremely important to document the code very well, especially the case blocks, so that other readers can figure out directly which value stands for what (like i did).

If there are more than two options per variable, you can work in factors of 10 (like in method foo, use (trueCond ? 1 : 0) * Math.pow(10, level))

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    This is not a Java question. – user694733 May 31 '17 at 11:18
0

Since your 3 conditions are fixed, you can have them first, followed by others, which can be converted to switch-case.

if(price > 0 || jsBed <= bedroom || jsBuilt >= built) {
    var locCheck = (loc > 0) ? 1 : 0;
    var catCheck = (cat > 0) ? 1 : 0;
    switch(locCheck + catCheck){
        case 0:
            break;
        case 1:
            break;
        case 2:
            break;
        default:
            break;
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • (loc > 0) ? 1 : 0 can be replaced as +(loc > 0). Also as OP has multiple OR condition, even if last 3 conditions are false, code has to be executed. Your code will not work – Rajesh May 31 '17 at 7:10
  • This is not equivalent to OP's code. If price > 0 || jsBed <= bedroom || jsBuilt >= built is false when loc & cat are positive numbers, the code will not execute at all. While in OP's code first if statement body will execute. – Tushar May 31 '17 at 7:12
  • Hmm, you are right @Tushar. And tweaking it would result to similar as Mureinik – Milan Chheda May 31 '17 at 7:14
  • case 1 would require an additional conditional with in it to determine whether loc or cat was >0. Alternatively, you could use different values for locCheck and catCheck. eg, 1 & 2 would give you 0, 1, 2 & 3 as the cases. – Shaggy May 31 '17 at 7:29

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