69

I know how to pass compiler options using the cmake command

set(CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS "-Wall -Wno-dev -Wl,-rpath=/home/abcd/libs/")

Is there also any way to pass the options from the command line, that will override the CMakeList.txt options , something like -

cmake -Wl,-rpath=/home/abcd/newlibs/ path/to/CMakeLists.txt

or

cmake -D CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS="-Wno-dev -Wl,-rpath=/home/abcd/libs/" path/to/CMakeLists.txt

My main problem is that I want to know how to append flags and how to override existing compiler flags from the command line.

1
  • 5
    -Wno-dev is a CMake option, -Wall is a compilation option, -Wl begins link option. They are passed differently. And while compilation option and linker option has something common, CMake option is unrelated to them.
    – Tsyvarev
    May 31, 2017 at 13:31

6 Answers 6

67

Yes, you can append compiler and linker options. But there are two things you have to differentiate in CMake: first call to generate the build environment and all consecutive calls for re-generating that build environment after changes to your CMakeList.txt files or dependencies.

Here are some of the possibilities (excluding the more complex toolchain variants):

Append Compiler Flags

  1. The initial content from the cached CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS variable is a combination of CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS_INIT set by CMake itself during OS/toolchain detection and whatever is set in the CXXFLAGS environment variable. So you can initially call:

    cmake -E env CXXFLAGS="-Wall" cmake ..
    
  2. Later CMake would expect that the user modifies the CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS cached variable directly to append things e.g. by using an editor like ccmake commit with CMake.

  3. You can easily introduce your own build type like ALL_WARNINGS. The build type specific parts are appended:

     cmake -DCMAKE_CXX_FLAGS_ALL_WARNINGS:STRING="-Wall" -DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=ALL_WARNINGS ..
    

Append Linker Flags

The linker options are more or less equivalent to the compiler options. Just that CMake's variable names depend on the target type (EXE, SHARED or MODULE).

  1. The CMAKE_EXE_LINKER_FLAGS_INIT, CMAKE_SHARED_LINKER_FLAGS_INIT or CMAKE_MODULE_LINKER_FLAGS_INIT do combine with the evironment variable LDFLAGS to CMAKE_EXE_LINKER_FLAGS, CMAKE_SHARED_LINKER_FLAGS and CMAKE_MODULE_LINKER_FLAGS.

    So you can e.g call:

    cmake -E env LDFLAGS="-rpath=/home/abcd/libs/" cmake ..
    
  2. See above.

  3. Build type specific parts are appended:

    cmake -DCMAKE_SHARED_LINKER_FLAGS_MY_RPATH:STRING="-rpath=/home/abcd/libs/" -DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=MY_RPATH ..
    

Alternatives

Just be aware that CMake does provide special variable to set complier/linker flags in a platform independent way. So you don't need to know the specific compiler/linker option.

Here are some examples:

Unfortunately there is none for the compiler's warning level (yet)

References

1
  • unfortunately the approach with cmake -E env CXXFLAGS="..." .. doesn't work on Windows - the error "Access is denied" is shown even when running the tool with administrative permissions.
    – AntonK
    Nov 6, 2021 at 22:38
27

My answer aims to prove one thing:

Command line options like CMAKE_C_FLAGS and CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS always append and never overwrite.

Here it comes.

Prepare files under folder hello_world

hello.c

#include <stdio.h>


int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    printf("Hello World!\n");
#ifdef DEFINED_IN_CMAKELISTS
    printf("You are here because you defined DEFINED_IN_CMAKELISTS in CMakeLists and it is not overwritten.\n");
#else
    printf("You are here because CLI CMAKE_C_FLAGS overwrote DEFINED_IN_CMAKELISTS, or you have NOT defined DEFINED_IN_CMAKELISTS.\n");
#endif 
#ifdef DEFINED_IN_CLI
    printf("You are here because you defined DEFINED_IN_CLI when running cmake -DCMAKE_C_FLAGS.\n");
#else
    printf("You are here because you have NOT defined DEFINED_IN_CLI when running cmake -DCMAKE_C_FLAGS.\n");
#endif // #ifdef DEFINED_IN_CLI
    return 0;
}

CMakeLists.txt

cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.4.1 FATAL_ERROR)
project(Hello)

set(HELLO_SRCS Hello.c)

add_executable(Hello ${HELLO_SRCS})

set(CMAKE_C_FLAGS "${CMAKE_C_FLAGS} -DDEFINED_IN_CMAKELISTS")

Generate CMake files

$ mkdir _build && cd _build && cmake ..
-- The C compiler identification is AppleClang 11.0.3.11030032
-- The CXX compiler identification is AppleClang 11.0.3.11030032
-- Check for working C compiler: /Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Toolchains/XcodeDefault.xctoolchain/usr/bin/cc
-- Check for working C compiler: /Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Toolchains/XcodeDefault.xctoolchain/usr/bin/cc -- works
-- Detecting C compiler ABI info
-- Detecting C compiler ABI info - done
-- Detecting C compile features
-- Detecting C compile features - done
-- Check for working CXX compiler: /Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Toolchains/XcodeDefault.xctoolchain/usr/bin/c++
-- Check for working CXX compiler: /Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Toolchains/XcodeDefault.xctoolchain/usr/bin/c++ -- works
-- Detecting CXX compiler ABI info
-- Detecting CXX compiler ABI info - done
-- Detecting CXX compile features
-- Detecting CXX compile features - done
-- Configuring done
-- Generating done
-- Build files have been written to: /Users/me/Desktop/_dev/playground/cmake/hello_world/_build

Make and run

$ make
Scanning dependencies of target Hello
[ 50%] Building C object CMakeFiles/Hello.dir/Hello.c.o
[100%] Linking C executable Hello
[100%] Built target Hello
$ ./Hello
Hello World!
You are here because you defined DEFINED_IN_CMAKELISTS in CMakeLists and it is not overwritten.
You are here because you have NOT defined DEFINED_IN_CLI when running cmake -DCMAKE_C_FLAGS.

Define new compiler options from command line

$ cmake -DCMAKE_C_FLAGS="-DDEFINED_IN_CLI" ..
-- Configuring done
-- Generating done
-- Build files have been written to: /Users/me/Desktop/_dev/playground/cmake/hello_world/_build

Make and run

$ make
[ 50%] Building C object CMakeFiles/Hello.dir/Hello.c.o
[100%] Linking C executable Hello
[100%] Built target Hello
$ ./Hello 
Hello World!
You are here because you defined DEFINED_IN_CMAKELISTS in CMakeLists and it is not overwritten.
You are here because you defined DEFINED_IN_CLI when running cmake -DCMAKE_C_FLAGS.

Conclusion

From the above test, you can see that even without hard-appending using something like

-DCMAKE_C_FLAGS="${CMAKE_C_FLAGS} -DDEFINED_IN_CLI"

, CMake still appends the CLI options to what's already in CMakeLists.txt.

2
  • 3
    Super answer. This one should be rated #1. Oct 23, 2020 at 0:10
  • The experiment is partially misleading! In my environment (Windows 10, CMake 3.21.4, VS2019) when looking into CMakeCache.txt the default flags are CMAKE_C_FLAGS:STRING=/DWIN32 /D_WINDOWS /W3, and when the command line option is specified these flags become CMAKE_C_FLAGS:STRING=-DDEFINED_IN_CLI, which is totally different story.
    – AntonK
    Nov 6, 2021 at 12:06
15
cmake -D CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS="-Wno-dev -Wl,-rpath=/home/abcd/libs/" path/to/CMakeLists.txt

this should work, the problem is that if you find_package() some package that also change the CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS, then it would not only partially work.

3
  • 3
    okay, I guessed that too for overriding. But how do you append an option to the existing option. Here "=" wont work. Jun 1, 2017 at 10:17
  • sorry, I don't know how to append a variable via commandline. MAYBE CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS="${CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS} NewFlag" will work from commandline. Jun 1, 2017 at 10:34
  • That should not be expected to work as may shells will interpret ${SOMETOKEN} to be a shell expansion of a shell variable. Single quotes however might work, haven't tested.
    – Catskul
    Jun 20, 2018 at 13:55
1

Perhaps this would work -

cmake -DCMAKE_CXX_FLAGS="$(CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS) -DYOUR_CUSTOM_DEFINE=1" <rest of original cmake cmdline>

like Tomaz mentioned above. -m

2
  • Code only answers are discouraged. Please add some explanation as to how this solves the problem, or how this differs from the existing answers. From Review
    – Nick
    Feb 15, 2020 at 1:47
  • The syntax is slightly different, using () instead of {} shown above. I tested to verify it works correctly. This method adds what is specified to the existing CXX_FLAGS and does not overwrite it.
    – M Kelly
    Feb 15, 2020 at 3:08
0

Most of answers here are valid, but I have also stumbled on how to pass CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS and add include directory with space in it (Windows).

Apparently if you run that argument from command line - you need to be extra careful with quotation (See also here)

cmake ... -DCMAKE_CXX_FLAGS="-fms-compatibility-version=19.00 --target=i686--windows -X -I """C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\10\Include\10.0.18362.0\um""" "

So if include path contains spaces, and that needs to be quoted, but you need also to quote CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS, which ends up with starting quotation with single quote character ("), and whenever you need quote - you place three quotation characters instead. (""")

That's bit odd in overall. Took a while to figure this out.

0
0

I simply use the $ENV() operator to get the environment variable, for example in a CMakeLists.txt:

add_compile_options($ENV{MY_CXXFLAG})

The only problem is that $ENV() is only read on configuration stage so cmake does not see the environment setting on the current build stage. But re-configuring is triggered by changed cmake files so I just use touch to simulate a change. Here is an example of a command line:

touch CMakeLists.txt && MY_CXXFLAG="-D DEBUG" cmake --build build --config Debug

or what other options do you use. With this simple example there are still some quirks with the flag string of the environment variable, e.g. more than one option. But it shouldn't be a big problem with string handling in CMakeLists.txt to beautify this.

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