17

I have data that looks like this:

library("tidyverse")

df <- tibble(user = c(1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 3), x = c("a", "b", "a", "a", "c", "d"), y = 1)
df

#    user     x     y
# 1     1     a     1
# 2     1     b     1
# 3     2     a     1
# 4     3     a     1
# 5     3     c     1
# 6     3     d     1

Python format:

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame({'user':[1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 3], 'x':['a', 'b', 'a', 'a', 'c', 'd'], 'y':1})

I'd like to "complete" the data frame so that every user has a record for every possible x with the default y fill set to 0.

This is somewhat trivial in R (tidyverse/tidyr):

df %>% 
    complete(nesting(user), x = c("a", "b", "c", "d"), fill = list(y = 0))

#    user     x     y
# 1     1     a     1
# 2     1     b     1
# 3     1     c     0
# 4     1     d     0
# 5     2     a     1
# 6     2     b     0
# 7     2     c     0
# 8     2     d     0
# 9     3     a     1
# 10    3     b     0
# 11    3     c     1
# 12    3     d     1

Is there a complete equivalent in pandas / python that will yield the same result?

4 Answers 4

22

You can use reindex by MultiIndex.from_product:

df = df.set_index(['user','x'])
mux = pd.MultiIndex.from_product([df.index.levels[0], df.index.levels[1]],names=['user','x'])
df = df.reindex(mux, fill_value=0).reset_index()
print (df)
    user  x  y
0      1  a  1
1      1  b  1
2      1  c  0
3      1  d  0
4      2  a  1
5      2  b  0
6      2  c  0
7      2  d  0
8      3  a  1
9      3  b  0
10     3  c  1
11     3  d  1

Or set_index + stack + unstack:

df = df.set_index(['user','x'])['y'].unstack(fill_value=0).stack().reset_index(name='y')
print (df)
    user  x  y
0      1  a  1
1      1  b  1
2      1  c  0
3      1  d  0
4      2  a  1
5      2  b  0
6      2  c  0
7      2  d  0
8      3  a  1
9      3  b  0
10     3  c  1
11     3  d  1
0
0

It's very easy now to use those dplyr/tidyr APIs in python with datar:

>>> from datar.all import f, c, tibble, complete, nesting
>>> df = tibble(user=c(1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 3), x=c("a", "b", "a", "a", "c", "d"), y=1)
>>> df >> complete(nesting(f.user), x=c("a", "b", "c", "d"), fill={'y': 0})
      user        x         y
   <int64> <object> <float64>
0        1        a       1.0
1        1        b       1.0
2        1        c       0.0
3        1        d       0.0
4        2        a       1.0
5        2        b       0.0
6        2        c       0.0
7        2        d       0.0
8        3        a       1.0
9        3        b       0.0
10       3        c       1.0
11       3        d       1.0

I am the author of the package. Feel free to submit issues if you have any questions.

0

We could use the complete function from pyjanitor, which provides a convenient abstraction to generate the missing rows :

# pip install pyjanitor
import pandas as pd
import janitor
df.complete('user', 'x', fill_value = 0)

    user  x  y
0      1  a  1
1      1  b  1
2      1  c  0
3      1  d  0
4      2  a  1
5      2  b  0
6      2  c  0
7      2  d  0
8      3  a  1
9      3  b  0
10     3  c  1
11     3  d  1

More examples can be found here

0

Another Panda's option could be using pivot + fillna + melt:

df2 = (df
       .pivot(index='user', columns='x', values='y')
       .fillna(0)
       .melt(value_name='y', ignore_index=False)
       .reset_index()
       .sort_values(['user', 'x'])
       )

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