431

I have a simple mysql table:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `pers` (
  `persID` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(35) NOT NULL,
  `gehalt` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `chefID` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`persID`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=4 ;

INSERT INTO `pers` (`persID`, `name`, `gehalt`, `chefID`) VALUES
(1, 'blb', 1000, 3),
(2, 'as', 1000, 3),
(3, 'chef', 1040, NULL);

I tried to run following update, but I get only the error 1093:

UPDATE pers P 
SET P.gehalt = P.gehalt * 1.05 
WHERE (P.chefID IS NOT NULL 
OR gehalt < 
(SELECT (
    SELECT MAX(gehalt * 1.05) 
    FROM pers MA 
    WHERE MA.chefID = MA.chefID) 
    AS _pers
))

I searched for the error and found from mysql following page http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/subquery-restrictions.html, but it doesn't help me.

What shall I do to correct the sql query?

1

11 Answers 11

866

The problem is that MySQL, for whatever inane reason, doesn't allow you to write queries like this:

UPDATE myTable
SET myTable.A =
(
    SELECT B
    FROM myTable
    INNER JOIN ...
)

That is, if you're doing an UPDATE/INSERT/DELETE on a table, you can't reference that table in an inner query (you can however reference a field from that outer table...)


The solution is to replace the instance of myTable in the sub-query with (SELECT * FROM myTable), like this

UPDATE myTable
SET myTable.A =
(
    SELECT B
    FROM (SELECT * FROM myTable) AS something
    INNER JOIN ...
)

This apparently causes the necessary fields to be implicitly copied into a temporary table, so it's allowed.

I found this solution here. A note from that article:

You don’t want to just SELECT * FROM table in the subquery in real life; I just wanted to keep the examples simple. In reality, you should only be selecting the columns you need in that innermost query, and adding a good WHERE clause to limit the results, too.

24
  • 13
    I don't think the reason is inane. Think about the semantics. Either MySQL has to keep a copy of the table before the update started, or the inner query might use data that has already been updated by the query as it's in progress. Neither of these side-effects is necessarily desirable, so the safest bet is to force you to specify what will happen using an extra table.
    – siride
    Mar 9, 2013 at 20:54
  • 48
    @siride: Other databases, such as MSSQL or Oracle, don't have this arbitrary restriction Mar 13, 2013 at 19:14
  • 5
    @BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft: it's not arbitrary. It's reasonable design decision based on the costs of the alternatives. The other DB systems chose to deal with those costs anyway. But those systems don't, e.g., let you include non-aggregated columns in SELECT lists when you use GROUP BY, and MySQL does. I'd argue that MySQL is in the wrong here, and I might say the same of the other DBMSs for UPDATE statements.
    – siride
    Mar 13, 2013 at 20:50
  • 42
    @siride From a relational algebra point of view, T and (SELECT * FROM T) are completely equivalent. They are the same relation. Therefore this is an arbitrary, inane restriction. More specifically, it's a workaround to coerce MySQL into doing something that it clearly can do, but for some reason it cannot parse in its simpler form.
    – Tobia
    Jan 19, 2015 at 14:22
  • 4
    In my case the accepted solution didn't work because my table was simply too large. The query never completed. Apparently this is taking too many internal resources. Instead I created a View with the inner query and used it for the data selection, which worked absolutely fine. DELETE FROM t WHERE tableID NOT IN (SELECT viewID FROM t_view); Also I recommend running OPTIMIZE TABLE t; afterwards to reduce the size of the table.
    – CodeX
    Oct 13, 2016 at 11:36
53

You can make this in three steps:

CREATE TABLE test2 AS
SELECT PersId 
FROM pers p
WHERE (
  chefID IS NOT NULL 
  OR gehalt < (
    SELECT MAX (
      gehalt * 1.05
    )
    FROM pers MA
    WHERE MA.chefID = p.chefID
  )
)

...

UPDATE pers P
SET P.gehalt = P.gehalt * 1.05
WHERE PersId
IN (
  SELECT PersId
  FROM test2
)
DROP TABLE test2;

or

UPDATE Pers P, (
  SELECT PersId
  FROM pers p
  WHERE (
   chefID IS NOT NULL 
   OR gehalt < (
     SELECT MAX (
       gehalt * 1.05
     )
     FROM pers MA
     WHERE MA.chefID = p.chefID
   )
 )
) t
SET P.gehalt = P.gehalt * 1.05
WHERE p.PersId = t.PersId
7
  • 16
    Well yeah, most subqueries can be rewritten as multiple steps with CREATE TABLE statements - I hope the author was aware of this. However, is this the only solution? Or can the query be rewritten with subqueries or joins? And why (not) do that?
    – Konerak
    Dec 13, 2010 at 13:49
  • I think you have a capitalization error in your second solution. Shouldn't UPDATE Pers P read UPDATE pers P? Dec 19, 2012 at 19:26
  • 2
    Tried this solution and for a large number of entries in temporary/second table the query can be very slow; try to create temporary/second table with an index/primary key [see dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/create-table-select.html ]
    – Alex
    Feb 11, 2013 at 9:25
  • As @Konerak states, this isn't really the best answer. The answer from BlueRaja below seems best to me. Upvotes seem to agree.
    – ShatyUT
    Jul 9, 2014 at 19:47
  • @Konerak, Doesn't CREATE TABLE AS SELECT give horrible performance?
    – Pacerier
    Feb 24, 2015 at 3:36
29

In Mysql, you can not update one table by subquery the same table.

You can separate the query in two parts, or do

 UPDATE TABLE_A AS A
 INNER JOIN TABLE_A AS B ON A.field1 = B.field1
 SET field2 = ? 
4
  • 5
    SELECT ... SET? I've never heard about this.
    – Serge S.
    May 23, 2012 at 19:24
  • @grisson Thanks for the clarification. Now I get why my IN clause doesn't work - I was targeting the same table.
    – Anthony
    Sep 4, 2012 at 2:43
  • 2
    ...this doesn't seem to actually work. It's still giving me the same error. Jan 13, 2013 at 0:05
  • 2
    this answer actually does the more correct and efficient thing, which is using AS B on the second reference to TABLE_A. the answer in the most-upvoted example could be simplified using AS T instead of the potentially inefficient FROM (SELECT * FROM myTable) AS something, which fortunately the query optimizer typically eliminates but might not always do so.
    – natbro
    Jun 17, 2013 at 14:33
26

Make a temporary table (tempP) from a subquery

UPDATE pers P 
SET P.gehalt = P.gehalt * 1.05 
WHERE P.persID IN (
    SELECT tempP.tempId
    FROM (
        SELECT persID as tempId
        FROM pers P
        WHERE
            P.chefID IS NOT NULL OR gehalt < 
                (SELECT (
                    SELECT MAX(gehalt * 1.05) 
                    FROM pers MA 
                    WHERE MA.chefID = MA.chefID) 
                    AS _pers
                )
    ) AS tempP
)

I've introduced a separate name (alias) and give a new name to 'persID' column for temporary table

2
  • Why not select the values into variables instead of doing inner inner inner selects?
    – Pacerier
    Feb 24, 2015 at 3:42
  • SELECT ( SELECT MAX(gehalt * 1.05).. - the first SELECT does not select any column. Nov 9, 2017 at 11:18
19

It's quite simple. For example, instead of writing:

INSERT INTO x (id, parent_id, code) VALUES (
    NULL,
    (SELECT id FROM x WHERE code='AAA'),
    'BBB'
);

you should write

INSERT INTO x (id, parent_id, code)
VALUES (
    NULL,
    (SELECT t.id FROM (SELECT id, code FROM x) t WHERE t.code='AAA'),
    'BBB'
);

or similar.

17

The Approach posted by BlueRaja is slow I modified it as I was using to delete duplicates from the table. In case it helps anyone with large tables Original Query

DELETE FROM table WHERE id NOT IN (SELECT MIN(id) FROM table GROUP BY field 2)

This is taking more time:

DELETE FROM table WHERE ID NOT IN(
  SELECT MIN(t.Id) FROM (SELECT Id, field2 FROM table) AS t GROUP BY field2)

Faster Solution

DELETE FROM table WHERE ID NOT IN(
   SELECT t.Id FROM (SELECT MIN(Id) AS Id FROM table GROUP BY field2) AS t)
0
11

MySQL doesn't allow selecting from a table and update in the same table at the same time. But there is always a workaround :)

This doesn't work >>>>

UPDATE table1 SET col1 = (SELECT MAX(col1) from table1) WHERE col1 IS NULL;

But this works >>>>

UPDATE table1 SET col1 = (SELECT MAX(col1) FROM (SELECT * FROM table1) AS table1_new) WHERE col1 IS NULL;
2
  • 1
    Thanks. I think most people confused with local env xampp using MariaDB then production server still use MySQL Jul 14, 2021 at 9:29
  • After finding issues for 5 hours this is answer did the work. Thank you
    – Shwet
    Dec 28, 2021 at 20:01
9

MariaDB has lifted this starting from 10.3.x (both for DELETE and UPDATE):

UPDATE - Statements With the Same Source and Target

From MariaDB 10.3.2, UPDATE statements may have the same source and target.

Until MariaDB 10.3.1, the following UPDATE statement would not work:

UPDATE t1 SET c1=c1+1 WHERE c2=(SELECT MAX(c2) FROM t1);
  ERROR 1093 (HY000): Table 't1' is specified twice, 
  both as a target for 'UPDATE' and as a separate source for data

From MariaDB 10.3.2, the statement executes successfully:

UPDATE t1 SET c1=c1+1 WHERE c2=(SELECT MAX(c2) FROM t1);

DELETE - Same Source and Target Table

Until MariaDB 10.3.1, deleting from a table with the same source and target was not possible. From MariaDB 10.3.1, this is now possible. For example:

DELETE FROM t1 WHERE c1 IN (SELECT b.c1 FROM t1 b WHERE b.c2=0);

DBFiddle MariaDB 10.2 - Error

DBFiddle MariaDB 10.3 - Success

8

Just as reference, you can also use Mysql Variables to save temporary results, e.g.:

SET @v1 := (SELECT ... );
UPDATE ... SET ... WHERE x=@v1;

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/user-variables.html

1
  • 2
    this is good to know in general, but it doesn't work for updating/deleting multiple rows ERROR 1242 (21000): Subquery returns more than 1 row
    – lewis
    Aug 10, 2020 at 12:58
3

If you are trying to read fieldA from tableA and save it on fieldB on the same table, when fieldc = fieldd you might want consider this.

UPDATE tableA,
    tableA AS tableA_1 
SET 
    tableA.fieldB= tableA_1.filedA
WHERE
    (((tableA.conditionFild) = 'condition')
        AND ((tableA.fieldc) = tableA_1.fieldd));

Above code copies the value from fieldA to fieldB when condition-field met your condition. this also works in ADO (e.g access )

source: tried myself

0

Other workarounds include using SELECT DISTINCT or LIMIT in the subquery, although these are not as explicit in their effect on materialization. this worked for me

as mentioned in MySql Doc

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