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The following code snippet causes stackoverflow.

Unhandled exception at 0x00007FF74F27A526 in OpenARK-SDK.exe: 0xC00000FD: Stack overflow (parameters: 0x0000000000000001, 0x000000EEC5803FD8).

How can I fix it? It is part of an open-source repository I am contributing to and I hope not to do a major change here:

/***
Recursively performs floodfill on depthMap
***/
void DepthCamera::floodFill(int x, int y, cv::Mat& depthMap, cv::Mat& mask, double max_distance)
{
    if (x < 0 || x >= depthMap.cols || y < 0 || y >= depthMap.rows || depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y, x)[2] == 0.0)
        return;
    if (closeEnough(x, y, depthMap, 4, max_distance)) {
        mask.at<cv::Vec3f>(y, x) = depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y, x);
        depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y, x)[0] = 0;
        depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y, x)[1] = 0;
        depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y, x)[2] = 0;
    }
    else {
        return;
    }

    floodFill(x + 1, y, depthMap, mask, max_distance);
    floodFill(x - 1, y, depthMap, mask, max_distance);
    floodFill(x, y + 1, depthMap, mask, max_distance);
    floodFill(x, y - 1, depthMap, mask, max_distance);
}

/***
Check whether candidate point is close enough to neighboring points
***/
bool DepthCamera::closeEnough(int x, int y, cv::Mat& depthMap, int num_neighbors, double max_distance)
{
    int num_close = 0;
    if (x - 1 < 0 || depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y, x - 1)[2] == 0 || Util::euclidianDistance3D(depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y, x), depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y, x - 1)) < max_distance) {
        num_close++;
    }
    if (x + 1 >= depthMap.cols || depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y, x + 1)[2] == 0 || Util::euclidianDistance3D(depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y, x), depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y, x + 1)) < max_distance) {
        num_close++;
    }
    if (y - 1 < 0 || depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y - 1, x)[2] == 0 || Util::euclidianDistance3D(depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y, x), depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y - 1, x)) < max_distance) {
        num_close++;
    }
    if (y + 1 >= depthMap.rows || depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y + 1, x)[2] == 0 || Util::euclidianDistance3D(depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y, x), depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(y + 1, x)) < max_distance) {
        num_close++;
    }

    if (num_close >= num_neighbors) {
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

and

double Util::euclidianDistance3D(cv::Vec3f pt1, cv::Vec3f pt2)
{
    double dx = pt1[0] - pt2[0];
    double dy = pt1[1] - pt2[1];
    double dz = pt1[2] - pt2[2];

    return sqrtf(dx*dx + dy*dy + dz*dz);
}

It is called by:

void DepthCamera::computeClusters(double max_distance, double min_size)
{
    clusters.clear();
    cv::Mat depthMap = cv::Mat::zeros(depthMap.rows, depthMap.cols, depthMap.type());
    cv::medianBlur(xyzMap, depthMap, 3);
    cv::Mat mask = cv::Mat::zeros(depthMap.rows, depthMap.cols, depthMap.type());
    for (int r = depthMap.rows - 1; r >= 0; r--) {
        for (int c = 0; c < depthMap.cols; c++) {
            if (depthMap.at<cv::Vec3f>(r, c)[2] > 0.2) {
                mask = cv::Mat::zeros(depthMap.rows, depthMap.cols, depthMap.type());
                floodFill(c, r, depthMap, mask, max_distance);
                cv::Mat channels[3];
                cv::split(mask, channels);
                if (cv::countNonZero(channels[2]) > min_size) {
                    cv::medianBlur(mask, mask, 3);
                    clusters.push_back(mask.clone());
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Please let me know if further information is needed. Basically, when I get closer to the camera, the stackoverflow exception happens. enter image description here

Here's a screenshot of the callstack: enter image description here

Here's a screencast of me trying to run without debugging it.

  • 2
    Can you look at the stack trace? A stack overflow is often either excessive recursion or excessive allocation. Go up level by level and look at the variables for ones that seem wrong. – Dave S Jun 1 '17 at 3:58
  • 3
    @MonaJalal -- It should have been obvious that you're calling the function over, and over, and over, and over, etc. etc. again to cause the stack overflow. Your recursion does not end, and you need to figure out why your logic never unwinds out of it. – PaulMcKenzie Jun 1 '17 at 4:08
  • 1
    No, it is telling you that the ending conditions for your recursion are incomplete or incorrect. That might be triggered by any camera depending on the bug or design flaw. – Dave S Jun 1 '17 at 4:31
  • 1
    You need to understand more how to use the debugger, and you (not us) should fix your bugs. Stack overflow bugs and infinite recursions are easy to fix. – Basile Starynkevitch Jun 1 '17 at 4:39
  • 1
    You are using the basic floodfill algorithm which uses a lot of stack.This Wikipedia article deals with this. – Jabberwocky Jun 1 '17 at 5:57
3

The ending conditions for your recursion are incomplete or incorrect.

If you look at floodfill, two cases return and one triggers recursion. That tells us the recursion block is incorrect. Specifically, that closeEnough() is not working as intended since you've triggered a case that never returns true.

You would look at the variables being passed to closeEnough to see why they never satisfy it. Just looking at the code I can tell that this is never true for the case where the stack overflows:

  if (num_close >= num_neighbors) {

I could guess at which conditions are not being met, but you can do that much more easily by looking at the values being passed to closeEnough.

If that isn't enough, please give us the values.

  • When I am debugging it line by line say by F10 and putting a breakpoint in the beginning of computeCluster, and get close to the camera or even start the debugging when I am close to the camera, the exception never happens which makes it so hard to figure what value causes the exception when I run without debugging – Mona Jalal Jun 1 '17 at 4:44
  • What is your debugger? In Visual Studio you can just run a debug build, wait for it to crash, then after it crashes you can still look at the variables for each level of the stack. If that is not possible you could have a build flag to write each call to closeEnough (with the values) to a log file, so you can see the values at crash time that way. – Dave S Jun 1 '17 at 4:46
  • In Visual Studio + Windows it's also possible to turn on full crash dumps for release builds. With the crash dump + PDB file + source you can again see the values of variables for calls on the stack frame. – Dave S Jun 1 '17 at 4:50
  • I am using visual studio 2015 imgur.com/a/bYkSq – Mona Jalal Jun 1 '17 at 4:50
  • If you run without debugging: When the crash happens, does Windows offer you the chance to "debug the application" if you show details about the crash? ("click retry to debug the application" for example) – Dave S Jun 1 '17 at 4:53
1

While I think this is not the best way to go about it, at least it's a fix in my case. enter image description here

Feel free to share other answers.

  • 3
    The real fix then is to write the code iteratively instead of recursively. This was pointed out by @MichealWalz in his comments. What happens if you find out that 2,000,000 bytes of stack isn't enough? Increase it again? – PaulMcKenzie Jun 1 '17 at 6:44
  • I have it in mind to look into using the native OpenCV floodfill algorithm and thanks for the feedback and the link. docs.opencv.org/trunk/d5/d26/ffilldemo_8cpp-example.html – Mona Jalal Jun 1 '17 at 6:45

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