113

I am not able to understand and I couldn't find the meaning of out keyword in kotlin.

You can check example here:

List<out T>

If any one can explain the meaning of this. It would be really appreciated.

78

With this signature:

List<out T>

you can do this:

val doubleList: List<Double> = listOf(1.0, 2.0)
val numberList: List<Number> = doubleList

which means T is covariant:

when a type parameter T of a class C is declared out, C<Base> can safely be a supertype of C<Derived>.

This is contrast with in, e.g.

Comparable<in T>

you can do this:

fun foo(numberComparable: Comparable<Number>) {
  val doubleComparable: Comparable<Double> = numberComparable
  // ...
}

which means T is contravariant:

when a type parameter T of a class C is declared in, C<Derived> can safely be a supertype of C<Base>.

Another way to remember it:

Consumer in, Producer out.

see Kotlin Generics Variance

-----------------updated on 4 Jan 2019-----------------

For the "Consumer in, Producer out", we only read from Producer - call method to get result of type T; and only write to Consumer - call method by passing in parameter of type T.

In the example for List<out T>, it is obvious that we can do this:

val n1: Number = numberList[0]
val n2: Number = doubleList[0]

So it is safe to provide List<Double> when List<Number> is expected, hence List<Number> is super type of List<Double>, but not vice versa.

In the example for Comparable<in T>:

val double: Double = 1.0
doubleComparable.compareTo(double)
numberComparable.compareTo(double)

So it is safe to provide Comparable<Number> when Comparable<Double> is expected, hence Comparable<Double> is super type of Comparable<Number>, but not vice versa.

6
  • 2
    I think the most important point for one seeing List<out T> declaration is that out makes it immutable (compared to mutable collections, which do not have out). It may help to mention and emphasize that in the answer. Implicit casting is a consequence of this rather than main point (since one cannot write to List<Number>, safe to have it as a reference to List<Double>). – minsk Nov 4 '17 at 0:32
  • 76
    Sorry, But still couldn't understand. – AkshayT Mar 9 '18 at 7:13
  • 3
    @minsk The out part isn't what makes List immutable though. You can easily make your own List<out T> interface that has a clear() method since it wouldn't require any arguments. – Nick Lowery Apr 13 '18 at 17:14
  • 1
    This is super confusing. What I like to remember is the rule PECS - producer extends, consumer super. In Kotlin out maps to the producer, in to the consumer. – Hawklike Mar 5 at 8:23
  • 1
    The example is very clear and correct. I think that Collection<out E> as defined in Kotlin library is extremely confusing, though. In fact everyone could wonder why Collection can be a producer of E if it accepts E as input parameter as well (see ::contains(E)). The trick is @UnsafeVariance annotation. But nowhere this is mentioned, and you must go trouhgh the source code to get it and say.... "oooohhhh"!!! – alecarnevale Apr 14 at 14:42
152
List<out T> is like List<? extends T> in Java

and

List<in T> is like List<? super T> in Java

For example in Kotlin you can do things like

 val value : List<Any> = listOf(1,2,3)
//since List signature is List<out T> in Kotlin
1
42

The variance modifiers out and in allow us to make our generic types less restrictive and more reusable by allowing subtyping.

Let's understand this with the help of contrasting examples. We'll use examples of cases as containers of various weapons. Assume that we have the following type hierarchy:

open class Weapon
open class Rifle : Weapon()
class SniperRifle : Rifle()

out produces T and preserves subtyping

When you declare a generic type with an out modifier, it's called covariant. A covariant is a producer of T, that means functions can return T but they can't take T as arguments:

class Case<out T> {
    private val contents = mutableListOf<T>()
    fun produce(): T = contents.last()         // Producer: OK
    fun consume(item: T) = contents.add(item)  // Consumer: Error
}

The Case declared with the out modifier produces T and its subtypes:

fun useProducer(case: Case<Rifle>) {
    // Produces Rifle and its subtypes
    val rifle = case.produce()
}

With the out modifier, the subtyping is preserved, so the Case<SniperRifle> is a subtype of Case<Rifle> when SniperRifle is a subtype of Rifle. As a result, the useProducer() function can be called with Case<SniperRifle> too:

useProducer(Case<SniperRifle>())               // OK
useProducer(Case<Rifle>)                       // OK
useProducer(Case<Weapon>())                    // Error

This is less restrictive and more reusable while producing but our class becomes read only.


in consumes T and reverses subtyping

When you declare a generic type with an in modifier, it's called contravariant. A contravariant is a consumer of T, that means functions can take T as arguments but they can't return T:

class Case<in T> {
    private val contents = mutableListOf<T>()
    fun produce(): T = contents.last()         // Producer: Error
    fun consume(item: T) = contents.add(item)  // Consumer: OK
}

The Case declared with the in modifier consumes T and its subtypes:

fun useConsumer(case: Case<Rifle>) {
    // Consumes Rifle and its subtypes
    case.consume(SniperRifle())
}

With the in modifier, the subtyping is reversed, so now the Case<Weapon> is a subtype of Case<Rifle> when Rifle is a subtype of Weapon. As a result, the useConsumer() function can be called with Case<Weapon> too:

useConsumer(Case<SniperRifle>())               // Error          
useConsumer(Case<Rifle>())                     // OK
useConsumer(Case<Weapon>())                    // OK

This is less restrictive and more reusable while consuming but our class becomes write only.


Invariant produces and consumes T, disallows subtyping

When you declare a generic type without any variance modifier, it's called invariant. An invariant is a producer as well as a consumer of T, that means functions can take T as arguments and can also return T:

class Case<T> {
    private val contents = mutableListOf<T>()
    fun produce(): T = contents.last()         // Producer: OK
    fun consume(item: T) = contents.add(item)  // Consumer: OK
}

The Case declared without in or out modifier produces and consumes T and its subtypes:

fun useProducerConsumer(case: Case<Rifle>) {
    // Produces Rifle and its subtypes
    case.produce()
    // Consumes Rifle and its subtypes
    case.consume(SniperRifle())
}

Without the in or out modifier, the subtyping is disallowed, so now neither Case<Weapon> nor Case<SniperRifle> is a subtype of Case<Rifle>. As a result, the useProducerConsumer() function can only be called with Case<Rifle>:

useProducerConsumer(Case<SniperRifle>())       // Error
useProducerConsumer(Case<Rifle>())             // OK
useProducerConsumer(Case<Weapon>())            // Error

This is more restrictive and less reusable while producing and consuming but we can read and write.


Conclusion

The List in Kotlin is a producer only. Because it's declared using the out modifier: List<out T>. This means you cannot add elements to it as the add(element: T) is a consumer function. Whenever you want to be able to get() as well as add() elements, use the invariant version MutableList<T>.

That's it! Hopefully that helps understand the ins and outs of the variance!

2
  • 5
    This should be the accepted answer. – Sơn Phan Apr 28 at 3:09
  • 1
    Great explanation, straight to the point with a good example. I was reading the other answers and still wasn't able to really understand the concepts. – Luis Pascual May 23 at 19:17
11

These answers explain what out does, but not why you need it, so let's pretend we didn't have out at all. Imagine three classes: Animal, Cat, Dog, and a function taking a list of Animal

abstract class Animal {
  abstract fun speak()
}

class Dog: Animal() {
  fun fetch() {}
  override fun speak() { println("woof") }
}

class Cat: Animal() {
  fun scratch() {}
  override fun speak() { println("meow") }
}

Since a Dog is a subtype of Animal, we want to use List<Dog> as a subtype of List<Animal> which means we want to be able to do this:

fun allSpeak(animals: List<Animal>) {
    animals.forEach { it.speak() }
}

fun main() {
  val dogs: List<Dog> = listOf(Dog(), Dog())
  allSpeak(dogs)

  val mixed: List<Animal> = listOf(Dog(), Cat())
  allSpeak(mixed)
}

And that's fine, the code will print woof woof for the dogs and woof meow for the mixed list.

The problem is when we have a mutable container. Since a List<Animal> can contain Dog and Cat, we can add either to a MutableList<Animal>

fun processAnimals(animals: MutableList<Animal>) {
   animals.add(Cat()) // uh oh, what if this is a list of Dogs?
}

fun main() {
  val dogs: MutableList<Dog> = mutableListOf(Dog(), Dog())
  processAnimals(dogs) // we just added a Cat to a list of Dogs!
  val d: Dog = dogs.last() // list of Dogs, so return type of .last() is Dog
                           // but this is actually a Cat
  d.fetch() // a Cat can't fetch, so what should happen here?
}

You can't safely consider MutableList<Dog> to be a subtype of MutableList<Animal> because you can do things to the latter (insert a cat) which you can't do to the former.

As a more extreme example:

val dogs: MutableList<Dog> = mutableListOf(Dog())
val anything: MutableList<Any> = dogs
// now I can add any type I want to the dogs list through the anything list
anything.add("hello world")

The problem only occurs when adding to the list, not reading from it. It is safe to use List<Dog> as List<Animal> because you can't append to List. This is what out tells us. out says "this is a type which I output, but I don't take it as new inputs which I consume"

4
  • @NaveenRao if you didn't have out then trying to call allSpeak(mixed) would fail to compile. You'd only be able call it with List<Animal> – Ryan Haining Mar 15 at 17:20
  • @NaveenRao actually sorry, I think I misunderstood your question. List is declared as List<out T>. Are you asking for an answer about what safety in gives you? – Ryan Haining Mar 15 at 20:06
  • Yeah i meant that as you gave examples of why there's need of outand in. Can you give same examples using outand in? – Naveen Rao Mar 16 at 5:44
  • 1
    @NaveenRao in the real world, List does use out, so allSpeak works and is safe – Ryan Haining Mar 16 at 21:56
6

Remember like this:

in is "for input" - you wanna put(write) something into it (so it's a "consumer")

out is "for output" - you wanna take(read) something out of it (so it's a "producer")

If you're from Java,

<in T> is for input, so it's like <? super T> (consumer)

<out T> is for output, so it's like <? extends T> (producer)

4

Refer to thie manual of kotlin

The Kotlin List<out T> type is an interface that provides read only operations like size, get and so on. Like in Java, it inherits from Collection<T> and that in turn inherits from Iterable<T>. Methods that change the list are added by the MutableList<T> interface. This pattern holds also for Set<out T>/MutableSet<T> and Map<K, out V>/MutableMap<K, V>

And this,

In Kotlin, there is a way to explain this sort of thing to the compiler. This is called declaration-site variance: we can annotate the type parameter T of Source to make sure that it is only returned (produced) from members of Source<T>, and never consumed. To do this we provide the out modifier:

> abstract class Source<out T> {
>     abstract fun nextT(): T }
> 
> fun demo(strs: Source<String>) {
>     val objects: Source<Any> = strs // This is OK, since T is an out-parameter
>     // ... }

The general rule is: when a type parameter T of a class C is declared out, it may occur only in out-position in the members of C, but in return C<Base> can safely be a supertype of C<Derived>.

In "clever words" they say that the class C is covariant in the parameter T, or that T is a covariant type parameter. You can think of C as being a producer of T's, and NOT a consumer of T's. The out modifier is called a variance annotation, and since it is provided at the type parameter declaration site, we talk about declaration-site variance. This is in contrast with Java's use-site variance where wildcards in the type usages make the types covariant.

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