22

I am generating bar plots using matplotlib and it looks like there is an bug with the stacked bar plot. The sum for each vertical stack should be 100. However, for X-AXIS ticks 65, 70,75 and 80 we get completely arbitrary results which do not make any sense. I do not understand what is the problem. Please find the MWE below.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib
header = ['a','b','c','d']
dataset= [('60.0', '65.0', '70.0', '75.0', '80.0', '85.0', '90.0', '95.0', '100.0', '105.0', '110.0', '115.0', '120.0', '125.0', '130.0', '135.0', '140.0', '145.0', '150.0', '155.0', '160.0', '165.0', '170.0', '175.0', '180.0', '185.0', '190.0', '195.0', '200.0'), (0.0, 25.0, 48.93617021276596, 83.01886792452831, 66.66666666666666, 66.66666666666666, 70.96774193548387, 84.61538461538461, 93.33333333333333, 85.0, 92.85714285714286, 93.75, 95.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 80.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0), (0.0, 50.0, 36.17021276595745, 11.320754716981133, 26.666666666666668, 33.33333333333333, 29.03225806451613, 15.384615384615385, 6.666666666666667, 15.0, 7.142857142857142, 6.25, 5.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 20.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0), (0.0, 12.5, 10.638297872340425, 3.7735849056603774, 4.444444444444445, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0), (100.0, 12.5, 4.25531914893617, 1.8867924528301887, 2.2222222222222223, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0)]
X_AXIS = dataset[0]

matplotlib.rc('font', serif='Helvetica Neue')
matplotlib.rc('text', usetex='false')
matplotlib.rcParams.update({'font.size': 40})

fig = matplotlib.pyplot.gcf()
fig.set_size_inches(18.5, 10.5)

configs = dataset[0]
N = len(configs)
ind = np.arange(N)
width = 0.4

p1 = plt.bar(ind, dataset[1], width, color='r')
p2 = plt.bar(ind, dataset[2], width, bottom=dataset[1], color='b')
p3 = plt.bar(ind, dataset[3], width, bottom=dataset[2], color='g')
p4 = plt.bar(ind, dataset[4], width, bottom=dataset[3], color='c')

plt.ylim([0,120])
plt.yticks(fontsize=12)
plt.ylabel(output, fontsize=12)
plt.xticks(ind, X_AXIS, fontsize=12, rotation=90)
plt.xlabel('test', fontsize=12)
plt.legend((p1[0], p2[0], p3[0], p4[0]), (header[0], header[1], header[2], header[3]), fontsize=12, ncol=4, framealpha=0, fancybox=True)
plt.show()

enter image description here

30

You need the bottom of each dataset to be the sum of all the datasets that came before. you may also need to convert the datasets to numpy arrays to add them together.

p1 = plt.bar(ind, dataset[1], width, color='r')
p2 = plt.bar(ind, dataset[2], width, bottom=dataset[1], color='b')
p3 = plt.bar(ind, dataset[3], width, 
             bottom=np.array(dataset[1])+np.array(dataset[2]), color='g')
p4 = plt.bar(ind, dataset[4], width,
             bottom=np.array(dataset[1])+np.array(dataset[2])+np.array(dataset[3]),
             color='c')

enter image description here

Alternatively, you could convert them to numpy arrays before you start plotting.

dataset1 = np.array(dataset[1])
dataset2 = np.array(dataset[2])
dataset3 = np.array(dataset[3])
dataset4 = np.array(dataset[4])

p1 = plt.bar(ind, dataset1, width, color='r')
p2 = plt.bar(ind, dataset2, width, bottom=dataset1, color='b')
p3 = plt.bar(ind, dataset3, width, bottom=dataset1+dataset2, color='g')
p4 = plt.bar(ind, dataset4, width, bottom=dataset1+dataset2+dataset3,
             color='c')

Or finally if you want to avoid converting to numpy arrays, you could use a list comprehension:

p1 = plt.bar(ind, dataset[1], width, color='r')
p2 = plt.bar(ind, dataset[2], width, bottom=dataset[1], color='b')
p3 = plt.bar(ind, dataset[3], width,
             bottom=[sum(x) for x in zip(dataset[1],dataset[2])], color='g')
p4 = plt.bar(ind, dataset[4], width,
             bottom=[sum(x) for x in zip(dataset[1],dataset[2],dataset[3])],
             color='c')
  • 1
    Why numpy array? – tandem Jun 1 '17 at 14:06
  • 1
    So you can add them together, element-wise. Sure you could do it with a list comprehension, but numpy makes it easier – tmdavison Jun 1 '17 at 14:06
  • You could obviously convert them to numpy arrays before you do the plotting, to save doing it in place and having to repeat the conversion. – tmdavison Jun 1 '17 at 14:09
  • How can we make changes to below line of code to provide different color for each element of dataset[1] rather than providing same color to plot whole dataset[1]? p1 = plt.bar(ind, dataset[1], width, color='r') – whywake Aug 30 at 10:27
  • 1
    @whywake you can provide a list of colors. or a string with multiple colors. It will cycle through those colors from left to right on the bar plot; if there are more bars than colors defined, it will loop back to the beginning of your list. For example: plt.bar(ind, dataset[1], width, color='rkmy') will cycle through red, black, magenta, yellow, and if there are more than 4 bars, go back to red. – tmdavison Aug 30 at 10:57
27

I found this such a pain that I wrote a function to do it. I'm sharing it in the hope that others find it useful:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

def plot_stacked_bar(data, series_labels, category_labels=None, 
                     show_values=False, value_format="{}", y_label=None, 
                     colors=None, grid=True, reverse=False):
    """Plots a stacked bar chart with the data and labels provided.

    Keyword arguments:
    data            -- 2-dimensional numpy array or nested list
                       containing data for each series in rows
    series_labels   -- list of series labels (these appear in
                       the legend)
    category_labels -- list of category labels (these appear
                       on the x-axis)
    show_values     -- If True then numeric value labels will 
                       be shown on each bar
    value_format    -- Format string for numeric value labels
                       (default is "{}")
    y_label         -- Label for y-axis (str)
    colors          -- List of color labels
    grid            -- If True display grid
    reverse         -- If True reverse the order that the
                       series are displayed (left-to-right
                       or right-to-left)
    """

    ny = len(data[0])
    ind = list(range(ny))

    axes = []
    cum_size = np.zeros(ny)

    data = np.array(data)

    if reverse:
        data = np.flip(data, axis=1)
        category_labels = reversed(category_labels)

    for i, row_data in enumerate(data):
        axes.append(plt.bar(ind, row_data, bottom=cum_size, 
                            label=series_labels[i], color=colors[i]))
        cum_size += row_data

    if category_labels:
        plt.xticks(ind, category_labels)

    if y_label:
        plt.ylabel(y_label)

    plt.legend()

    if grid:
        plt.grid()

    if show_values:
        for axis in axes:
            for bar in axis:
                w, h = bar.get_width(), bar.get_height()
                plt.text(bar.get_x() + w/2, bar.get_y() + h/2, 
                         value_format.format(h), ha="center", 
                         va="center")

Example:

plt.figure(figsize=(6, 4))

series_labels = ['Series 1', 'Series 2']

data = [
    [0.2, 0.3, 0.35, 0.3],
    [0.8, 0.7, 0.6, 0.5]
]

category_labels = ['Cat A', 'Cat B', 'Cat C', 'Cat D']

plot_stacked_bar(
    data, 
    series_labels, 
    category_labels=category_labels, 
    show_values=True, 
    value_format="{:.1f}",
    colors=['tab:orange', 'tab:green'],
    y_label="Quantity (units)"
)

plt.savefig('bar.png')
plt.show()

stacked bar plot example

  • Thanks for posting the code, can you please help in controlling the color also, and I want move the legend location outside the plot. – AKR Dec 28 '18 at 9:43
  • To specify the color of the bars use the color parameter of matplotlib.pyplot.bar. For how to place the legend outside the bounding box of the axes see this answer. – Bill Dec 28 '18 at 21:32
  • I was able to move the legend out, thanks, but if I want to use your stacked_bar code with customised colour option, how shall I edit the code.? Using std. matplotlib.pyplot.bar will force me specify other arguments as well. – AKR Dec 30 '18 at 9:21
  • @AKR I added a colors argument to the function. – Bill Oct 17 at 17:05
17

This is probably your most convenient solution if you are willing to use Pandas:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

X_AXIS = (
    '60.0', '65.0', '70.0', '75.0', '80.0', '85.0', '90.0', '95.0', '100.0', '105.0', 
    '110.0', '115.0', '120.0', '125.0', '130.0', '135.0', '140.0', '145.0', '150.0', 
    '155.0', '160.0', '165.0', '170.0', '175.0', '180.0', '185.0', '190.0', '195.0', 
    '200.0'
)

index = pd.Index(X_AXIS, name='test')

data = {
    'a': (0.0, 25.0, 48.93617021276596, 83.01886792452831, 66.66666666666666, 66.66666666666666, 70.96774193548387, 84.61538461538461, 93.33333333333333, 85.0, 92.85714285714286, 93.75, 95.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 80.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0, 100.0),
    'b': (0.0, 50.0, 36.17021276595745, 11.320754716981133, 26.666666666666668, 33.33333333333333, 29.03225806451613, 15.384615384615385, 6.666666666666667, 15.0, 7.142857142857142, 6.25, 5.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 20.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0),
    'c': (0.0, 12.5, 10.638297872340425, 3.7735849056603774, 4.444444444444445, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0),
    'd': (100.0, 12.5, 4.25531914893617, 1.8867924528301887, 2.2222222222222223, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0)
}

df = pd.DataFrame(data, index=index)
ax = df.plot(kind='bar', stacked=True, figsize=(18.5, 10.5))
ax.set_ylabel('foo')
plt.savefig('stacked.png')
plt.show()

Output:

enter image description here

2

If you're interested in ordered stacking (longest bars at bottom), here is how you can do it:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
a = pd.DataFrame({'a':[0.25, 0.5, 0.15, 0], 'b':[0.15, 0.25, 0.35, 0.15], 
                  'c':[0.50, 0.15, 0.5, 0.35], 'd':[0.35, 0.35, 0.25, 0.5],})

#       a     b     c     d
# 0  0.25  0.15  0.50  0.35
# 1  0.50  0.25  0.15  0.35
# 2  0.15  0.35  0.50  0.25
# 3  0.00  0.15  0.35  0.50

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
x = a.index
indexes = np.argsort(a.values).T
heights = np.sort(a.values).T
order = -1
bottoms = heights[::order].cumsum(axis=0)
bottoms = np.insert(bottoms, 0, np.zeros(len(bottoms[0])), axis=0)
mpp_colors = dict(zip(a.columns, plt.rcParams['axes.prop_cycle'].by_key()['color']))
for btms, (idxs, vals) in enumerate(list(zip(indexes, heights))[::order]):
    mps = np.take(np.array(a.columns), idxs)
    ax.bar(x, height=vals, bottom=bottoms[btms], color=[mpp_colors[m] for m in mps])
ax.set_ylim(bottom=0, top=2)
plt.legend((np.take(np.array(a.columns), np.argsort(a.values)[0]))[::order], loc='upper right')

enter image description here

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