5

I have a function that reads a file in chunks.

public static DataObject ReadNextFile(){ ...}

And dataobject looks like this:

public DataObject
{
   public string Category { get; set; }

   // And other members ...
}

What I want to do is the following basically

List<DataObject> dataObjects = new List<DataObject>();

while(ReadNextFile().Category == "category")
{
   dataObjects.Add(^^^^^ the thingy in the while);
}

I know it's probably not how it's done, because how do I access the object I've just read.

  • are you sure , what you want to ask? – TalentTuner Dec 13 '10 at 17:27
  • I having a hard time trying to figure out exactly what you want. – poindexter12 Dec 13 '10 at 17:28
  • I'm sorry I realize my question is very vague. It's just how do I access the object in the while(ReadNextElement()) :p – Timo Willemsen Dec 13 '10 at 17:30
  • Re the loop logic, is that really what you want to do? Wouldn't you rather read all the "matching" DataObjects from the file, whether there are others in between or not? – Karl Knechtel Dec 13 '10 at 18:07
  • 1
    @Timo: Just for the record: am I right in suggesting that your real DataObject contains more properties than just the category that you're testing for? – Jon Skeet Dec 13 '10 at 18:25
21

I think what you're looking for is:

List<DataObject> dataObjects = new List<DataObject>();

DataObject nextObject;
while((nextObject = ReadNextFile()).Category == "category")
{
   dataObjects.Add(nextObject);
}

But I wouldn't do that. I'd write:

List<DataObject> dataObject = source.ReadItems()
                                    .TakeWhile(x => x.Category == "Category")
                                    .ToList();

where ReadItems() was a method returning an IEnumerable<DataObject>, reading and yielding one item at a time. You may well want to implement it with an iterator block (yield return etc).

This is assuming you really want to stop reading as soon as you find the first object which has a different category. If you actually want to include all the matching DataObjects, change TakeWhile to Where in the above LINQ query.

(EDIT: Saeed has since deleted his objections to the answer, but I guess I might as well leave the example up...)

EDIT: Proof that this will work, as Saeed doesn't seem to believe me:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public class DataObject
{
    public string Category { get; set; }
    public int Id { get; set; }
}

class Test
{

    static int count = 0;

    static DataObject ReadNextFile()
    {
        count++;
        return new DataObject
        {
            Category = count <= 5 ? "yes" : "no",
            Id = count
        };
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        List<DataObject> dataObjects = new List<DataObject>();

        DataObject nextObject;
        while((nextObject = ReadNextFile()).Category == "yes")
        {
            dataObjects.Add(nextObject);
        }

        foreach (DataObject x in dataObjects)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", x.Id, x.Category);
        }
    }
}

Output:

1: yes
2: yes
3: yes
4: yes
5: yes

In other words, the list has retained references to the 5 distinct objects which have been returned from ReadNextFile.

  • Heya, this really seems like the best solution for this. There is however one thing, the file I'm reading from can be exceptionally big (few megabytes). Reading all items upfront, can that be a perfomance issue? – Timo Willemsen Dec 19 '10 at 13:58
3

This is subjective, but I hate this pattern (and I fully recognize that I am in the very small minority here). Here is how I do it when I need something like this.

var dataObjects = new List<DataObject>();
while(true) {
    DataObject obj = ReadNextFile();
    if(obj.Category != "category") {
        break;
    }
    dataObjects.Add(obj);
}

But these days, it is better to say

List<DataObject> dataObjects = GetItemsFromFile(path)
                                   .TakeWhile(x => x.Category == "category")
                                   .ToList();

Here, of course, GetItemsFromFile reads the items from the file pointed to by path and returns an IEnumerable<DataObject>.

  • 1
    @Saeed: What do you mean "because it's out of the question?" This is strange behavior, to be sure. – jason Dec 13 '10 at 18:28
  • 1
    @Saeed: It's an answer which doesn't answer the question. To my mind, that makes it a bad answer. This answer, however - the one you've downvoted - does answer the question. Can you give any reason for downvoting it other than because you're annoyed that others have downvoted your answer? – Jon Skeet Dec 13 '10 at 18:28
  • 1
    @Saeed: Why is "LINQ not an answer?" What do you mean "the first one does not address the OPs signature" (sic). – jason Dec 13 '10 at 19:13
  • 1
    @Saeed: The question as written cannot be answered while keeping the while(ReadNextFile().Category == "category") part (which isn't a signature, by the way). I see you're also assuming that upvotes for this answer are due to friendship rather than just agreeing with the answer... and you're also assuming that the downvotes cast against you correspond with upvotes for this answer. They do in my case, but you shouldn't assume that's true for others. – Jon Skeet Dec 14 '10 at 6:22
  • 1
    @Saeed: Um, I'm not speaking for others, that's the point - whereas you've assumed motives for upvoting this answer and downvoting yours. – Jon Skeet Dec 14 '10 at 7:36
1
List<DataObject> dataObjects = new List<DataObject>();
string category = "";

while((category=ReadNextFile().Category) == "category")
{
   dataObjects.Add(new DataObject{Category = category});
}

And if you have more complicated object you can do this (like jon):

List<DataObject> dataObjects = new List<DataObject>();
var category = new DataObject();

while((category=ReadNextFile()).Category == "category")
{
   dataObjects.Add(category);
}
  • Omg it's so simple... – Timo Willemsen Dec 13 '10 at 17:31
  • 1
    @Saeed: Sorry, my previous comment apparently didn't make it - I'm on a flaky 3G network connection. This won't compile, because you're trying to add a string to a List<DataObject>. The idea isn't to remember the last category, it's to remember the last DataObject. See my answer for the fixed version. – Jon Skeet Dec 13 '10 at 17:37
  • @Jon Skeet, I'd edited the answer, thanks, I didn't think about the type of list I just want to show the way OP wants. – Saeed Amiri Dec 13 '10 at 17:40
  • Now, Realy I can't understand the downvotes after my edit? – Saeed Amiri Dec 13 '10 at 17:41
  • 1
    6 years later, its still a poor answer. The first code snippet DOES NOT DO WHAT OP ASKED. Indeed, it doesn't do anything that anyone is likely to ever want to do. Which makes it a waste of time to try to make sense of this answer. The second code snippet does what is asked, but is poorly written: (1) the variable category is poorly named, as it no longer contains a category. (2) the variable category is initialized to a default DataObject. Why? It does not need to be initialized at all in this case, as it is only used in the loop. If anything, initialize it to null. – ToolmakerSteve Aug 27 '16 at 12:55
0

You should look into implementing IEnumerator on the class container the call to ReadNextFile(). Then you would always have reference to the current object with IEnumerator.Current, and MoveNext() will return the bool you are looking for to check for advancement. Something like this:

public class ObjectReader : IEnumerator<DataObject>
{
    public bool MoveNext()
    {
       // try to read next file, return false if you can't
       // if you can, set the Current to the returned DataObject
    }

    public DataObject Current
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }
}
  • You don't need to go to all the hassle of implementing it yourself - use iterator blocks instead. They rock :) – Jon Skeet Dec 13 '10 at 18:49
  • I agree you don't NEED to, but if that is the purpose of that object (which it looks like it is), it seems like it's a more elegant solution IMO. – poindexter12 Dec 13 '10 at 18:51
  • @poindexter12: Creating a whole type explicitly and then using it is more elegant than just writing a method using an iterator block? I suggest you try writing a complete solution both ways and then judge again... – Jon Skeet Dec 13 '10 at 19:22
  • @Jon: If you look at what he is asking, and don't try to add anything, yeah, an iterator is the smallest, quickest solution. Based on what he was asking though, it seemed like going through a list of objects and looking at what the current item exactly mirrors the purpose of the IEnumerator, hence the suggestion. – poindexter12 Dec 13 '10 at 19:32
  • @poindexter12: If you create an iterator block you can still use the generated IEnumerator<DataObject>. The calling code would be the same either way - the iterator block just saves you a lot of hassle. As I say, you should try implementing it both ways... – Jon Skeet Dec 13 '10 at 19:34

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