27

The dateutil parser does a great job of correctly guessing the date and time from a wide variety of sources.

We are processing files in which each file uses only one date/time format, but the format varies between files. Profiling shows a lot of time being used by dateutil.parser.parse. Since it only needs to be determined once per file, implementing something that isn't guessing the format each time could speed things up.

I don't actually know the formats in advance and I'll still need to infer the format. Something like:

from MysteryPackage import date_string_to_format_string
import datetime

# e.g. mystring = '1 Jan 2016'
myformat = None

...

# somewhere in a loop reading from a file or connection:
if myformat is None:
    myformat = date_string_to_format_string(mystring)

# do the usual checks to see if that worked, then:
mydatetime = datetime.strptime(mystring, myformat)

Is there such a function?

13
  • Look here: docs.python.org/2/library/… Jun 2 '17 at 5:45
  • 2
    It's not possible with dateutil. Check out dateinfer, as mentioned in the dupe. If you find a better solution, post an answer there too!
    – wim
    Jun 2 '17 at 5:59
  • 1
    Have you tried dateparser. Seems legit.
    – zipa
    Jun 5 '17 at 17:02
  • 1
    In my use case, we can assume the format will be the same in every date entry per file. I'm in Australia (a dayfirst locale), but we often deal with inflexible software that is monthfirst by default and tricky to change, so not all the users switch. In my dream package, a default could be assumed. Even better might be to "vote" using a collection dates from the file, and a warning if the results were still unclear.
    – Jason
    Jun 6 '17 at 21:44
  • 2
    Using multiple data points for analysis seems like a good approach. You could do this with a stateful class (create an instance per file), that trains itself on the strftime template as each new date come in (checking whether the strptime result and dateutil parser result are in agreement), it can attempt to use the current template, and fall back on dateutil.parser on failure. Presumably it will converge on a suitable strftime string which can be used without failure for the remainder of the file.
    – wim
    Jun 7 '17 at 19:12
10

This is a tricky one. My approach makes use of regular expressions and the (?(DEFINE)...) syntax which is only supported by the newer regex module.


Essentially, DEFINE let us define subroutines prior to matching them, so first of all we define all needed bricks for our date guessing function:

    (?(DEFINE)
        (?P<year_def>[12]\d{3})
        (?P<year_short_def>\d{2})
        (?P<month_def>January|February|March|April|May|June|
        July|August|September|October|November|December)
        (?P<month_short_def>Jan|Feb|Mar|Apr|May|Jun|Jul|Aug|Sep|Oct|Nov|Dec)
        (?P<day_def>(?:0[1-9]|[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01]))
        (?P<weekday_def>(?:Mon|Tue|Wednes|Thurs|Fri|Satur|Sun)day)
        (?P<weekday_short_def>Mon|Tue|Wed|Thu|Fri|Sat|Sun)
        (?P<hms_def>\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2})
        (?P<hm_def>\d{2}:\d{2})
            (?P<ms_def>\d{5,6})
            (?P<delim_def>([-/., ]+|(?<=\d|^)T))
        )
        # actually match them
        (?P<hms>^(?&hms_def)$)|(?P<year>^(?&year_def)$)|(?P<month>^(?&month_def)$)|(?P<month_short>^(?&month_short_def)$)|(?P<day>^(?&day_def)$)|
        (?P<weekday>^(?&weekday_def)$)|(?P<weekday_short>^(?&weekday_short_def)$)|(?P<hm>^(?&hm_def)$)|(?P<delim>^(?&delim_def)$)|(?P<ms>^(?&ms_def)$)
        """, re.VERBOSE)

After this, we need to think of possible delimiters:

# delim
delim = re.compile(r'([-/., ]+|(?<=\d)T)')

Format mapping:

# formats
formats = {'ms': '%f', 'year': '%Y', 'month': '%B', 'month_dec': '%m', 'day': '%d', 'weekday': '%A', 'hms': '%H:%M:%S', 'weekday_short': '%a', 'month_short': '%b', 'hm': '%H:%M', 'delim': ''}

The function GuessFormat() splits the parts with the help of the delimiters, tries to match them and outputs the corresponding code for strftime():

def GuessFormat(datestring):

    # define the bricks
    bricks = re.compile(r"""
            (?(DEFINE)
                (?P<year_def>[12]\d{3})
                (?P<year_short_def>\d{2})
                (?P<month_def>January|February|March|April|May|June|
                July|August|September|October|November|December)
                (?P<month_short_def>Jan|Feb|Mar|Apr|May|Jun|Jul|Aug|Sep|Oct|Nov|Dec)
                (?P<day_def>(?:0[1-9]|[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01]))
                (?P<weekday_def>(?:Mon|Tue|Wednes|Thurs|Fri|Satur|Sun)day)
                (?P<weekday_short_def>Mon|Tue|Wed|Thu|Fri|Sat|Sun)
                (?P<hms_def>T?\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2})
                (?P<hm_def>T?\d{2}:\d{2})
                (?P<ms_def>\d{5,6})
                (?P<delim_def>([-/., ]+|(?<=\d|^)T))
            )
            # actually match them
            (?P<hms>^(?&hms_def)$)|(?P<year>^(?&year_def)$)|(?P<month>^(?&month_def)$)|(?P<month_short>^(?&month_short_def)$)|(?P<day>^(?&day_def)$)|
            (?P<weekday>^(?&weekday_def)$)|(?P<weekday_short>^(?&weekday_short_def)$)|(?P<hm>^(?&hm_def)$)|(?P<delim>^(?&delim_def)$)|(?P<ms>^(?&ms_def)$)
            """, re.VERBOSE)

    # delim
    delim = re.compile(r'([-/., ]+|(?<=\d)T)')

    # formats
    formats = {'ms': '%f', 'year': '%Y', 'month': '%B', 'month_dec': '%m', 'day': '%d', 'weekday': '%A', 'hms': '%H:%M:%S', 'weekday_short': '%a', 'month_short': '%b', 'hm': '%H:%M', 'delim': ''}

    parts = delim.split(datestring)
    out = []
    for index, part in enumerate(parts):
        try:
            brick = dict(filter(lambda x: x[1] is not None, bricks.match(part).groupdict().items()))
            key = next(iter(brick))

            # ambiguities
            if key == 'day' and index == 2:
                key = 'month_dec'

            item = part if key == 'delim' else formats[key]
            out.append(item)
        except AttributeError:
            out.append(part)

    return "".join(out)

A test in the end:

import regex as re

datestrings = [datetime.now().isoformat(), '2006-11-02', 'Thursday, 10 August 2006 08:42:51', 'August 9, 1995', 'Aug 9, 1995', 'Thu, 01 Jan 1970 00:00:00', '21/11/06 16:30', 
'06 Jun 2017 20:33:10']

# test
for dt in datestrings:
    print("Date: {}, Format: {}".format(dt, GuessFormat(dt)))

This yields:

Date: 2017-06-07T22:02:05.001811, Format: %Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S.%f
Date: 2006-11-02, Format: %Y-%m-%d
Date: Thursday, 10 August 2006 08:42:51, Format: %A, %m %B %Y %H:%M:%S
Date: August 9, 1995, Format: %B %m, %Y
Date: Aug 9, 1995, Format: %b %m, %Y
Date: Thu, 01 Jan 1970 00:00:00, Format: %a, %m %b %Y %H:%M:%S
Date: 21/11/06 16:30, Format: %d/%m/%d %H:%M
Date: 06 Jun 2017 20:33:10, Format: %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S
6
  • 1
    Right, but just adding a new format every time is kind of missing the point. The whole idea is to infer the format, as dateutil parser already can, without having to manually update the parser definitions every time a new file or date format comes along. I also don't really understand what (DEFINE) is doing here, the answer could do with some explanation about that.
    – wim
    Jun 6 '17 at 19:10
  • @wim: Right you are and I have thought of another approach: splitting the parts in smaller bricks and analyzing them individually - see the updated answer with not fixed formats anymore.
    – Jan
    Jun 7 '17 at 12:48
  • It's getting there. Still needs some polish, and to handle failures more gracefully. e.g. GuessFormat(datetime.now().isoformat()) is crashing with unhandled AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'groupdict'
    – wim
    Jun 7 '17 at 19:07
  • @wim: True, haven't implemented any error checks yet - will update as soon as I get to it.
    – Jan
    Jun 7 '17 at 19:10
  • @wim: Shall the T occur in the output as well?
    – Jan
    Jun 7 '17 at 19:36
8
+150

I don't have a ready-made solution, but this is a very tricky problem and since too many brain-hours have already been spent on dateutil, instead of trying to replace that, I'll propose an approach that incorporates it:

  1. Read the first N records and parse each date using dateutil
  2. For each date part, note where in the string the value shows up
  3. If all (or >90%) date part locations match (like "YYYY is always after DD, separated by a comma and space"), turn that info into a strptime format string
  4. Switch to using datetime.strptime() with a relatively good level of confidence that it will work with the rest of the file

Since you stated that "each file uses only one date/time format", this approach should work (assuming you have different dates in each file so that mm/dd ambiguity can be resolved by comparing multiple date values).

4
  • This is similar to what I mentioned in a comment earlier here. Some code samples would be helpful.
    – wim
    Jun 13 '17 at 16:30
  • As a starting point for (2), I've had luck using pieces = re.split(r'\W+', date_string). From there, I can answer the question of "where in the string the value shows up" with pieces.index(<year/month/etc.>).
    – jobo3208
    Jul 17 '18 at 14:52
  • @Cahit , would you please clarify more your answer an example would be appreciated May 18 '19 at 12:11
  • @HarvesterHaidar, the implementation would need to be specific to the problem/file at hand, so a generic example is not practical at the moment. The basic idea is to develop an acceptable level of confidence for the date format in use after reading enough sample records and identifying/verifying that they all use the same formatting.
    – Cahit
    May 22 '19 at 19:05
4

You can write your own parser:

import datetime

class DateFormatFinder:
    def __init__(self):
        self.fmts = []

    def add(self,fmt):
        self.fmts.append(fmt)

    def find(self, ss):
        for fmt in self.fmts:            
            try:
                datetime.datetime.strptime(ss, fmt)
                return fmt
            except:
                pass
        return None

You can use it as follows:

>>> df = DateFormatFinder()
>>> df.add('%m/%d/%y %H:%M')
>>> df.add('%m/%d/%y')
>>> df.add('%H:%M')

>>> df.find("01/02/06 16:30")
'%m/%d/%y %H:%M'
>>> df.find("01/02/06")
'%m/%d/%y'
>>> df.find("16:30")
'%H:%M'
>>> df.find("01/02/06 16:30")
'%m/%d/%y %H:%M'
>>> df.find("01/02/2006")

However, It is not so simple as dates can be ambiguous and their format can not be determined without some context.

>>> datetime.strptime("01/02/06 16:30", "%m/%d/%y %H:%M") # us format
datetime.datetime(2006, 1, 2, 16, 30)
>>> datetime.strptime("01/02/06 16:30", "%d/%m/%y %H:%M") # european format
datetime.datetime(2006, 2, 1, 16, 30)
2
  • This is essentially the same suggestion as offered in the dupe here. It is incorrect to assume that a format string is correct, just because strptime doesn't raise any exception. Any acceptable solution needs more sophistication than that, perhaps using multiple data points.
    – wim
    Jun 5 '17 at 20:21
  • You are right - It is not a general solution. As I already said, the date can be ambiguous. However, If the dates formats are known and are not ambiguous - It can be a valid solution.
    – napuzba
    Jun 5 '17 at 20:32
0

You can try dateinfer module. It's pretty nice and deals with all your cases easily. Though if you need more fine control over the code and are ready to write it from scratch, regex does look like the best option.

2
  • dateinfer is mentioned in the comments under the original question. At the time, it gave a lot of garbage results.
    – Jason
    Sep 24 '20 at 10:32
  • yeah well it does have issues and I had to tweak it according to my use case. In that regard I found it helpful as I didn't have to write my logic from scratch. and didn't notice in it in the comments, my bad. :P Sep 24 '20 at 20:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.