The following code won't compile:

class A {
public:
    A(int) {}
};

class B: virtual public A {
public:
    B(): A(0) {}
};

// most derived class
class C: public B {
public:
    C() {} // wrong!!!
};

If I call A's constructor in C's constructor initialization list, that is:

// most derived class
class C: public B {
public:
    C(): A(0) {} // OK!!!
};

it does work.

Apparently, the reason is because virtual base classes must always be constructed by the most derived classes.

I don't understand the reason behind this limitation.

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Because it avoids this:

class A {
public:
    A(int) {}
};

class B0: virtual public A {
public:
    B0(): A(0) {}
};

class B1: virtual public A {
public:
    B1(): A(1) {}
};

class C: public B0, public B1 {
public:
    C() {} // How is A constructed? A(0) from B0 or A(1) from B1?
};
  • 17
    The famous diamond problem – CinCout Jun 2 '17 at 8:54
  • This would not be the only possible ambiguity with multiple inheritance, and the compiler could detect it equally well. So the argument is not convincing. – Peter A. Schneider Jun 2 '17 at 14:02
  • 8
    @PeterA.Schneider The compiler could not detect it if one of the constructors were defined in a different translation unit. Also detecting is not the same as fixing. How would you fix the ambiguity in this example if you couldn't modify B0 or B1? – Oktalist Jun 2 '17 at 14:37
  • 2
    @PeterA.Schneider let's suppose that you don't require C to define how it constructs A in some cases, where do you draw the line? when there is only one base? only when B0 and B1 both use constexpr values, that are the same value? only when B0 and B1 use the same literal? – Caleth Jun 2 '17 at 14:42
  • @Oktalist True on both accounts... I found the problem similar to ambiguous parent class function calls. But the functions are part of the class declaration, while the implementation of ctors are not, so right: The compiler can generally not see them. And it is true that there is no language construct to choose one of the initializations over the other (as opposed to a function call which is dis-ambiguated via scope resolution). – Peter A. Schneider Jun 2 '17 at 14:43

Because in the class hierarchy having a virtually inherited base class, the base class would/may be shared by multiple classes (in diamond inheritance for example, where the same base class is inherited by multiple classes). It means, there would be only one copy of the virtually-inherited base class. It essentially means, the base class must be constructed first. It eventually means the derived class must instantiate the given base class.

For example:

class A;
class B1 : virtual A;
class B2 : virtual A;
class C: B1,B2 // A is shared, and would have one copy only.
  • The shared base class object (of type A here) must actually be created last (before the most derived object, that is, but after its other base class objects of type B1 and B2). – Peter A. Schneider Jun 2 '17 at 14:04

I find this rule error-prone and cumbersome (but then, what part of multiple inheritance isn't?).

But the logically imposed order of construction must differ from the case of normal (non-virtual) inheritance. Consider Ajay's example, minus virtual:

class A;
class B1 : A;
class B2 : A;
class C: B1,B2

In this case for each C two As are constructed, one as part of B1's construction, the other one as part of B2's construction. The code of the B classes is responsible for that, and can do it. The order of events is:

Start C ctor
   Start B1 ctor
      A ctor (in B's ctor code)
   End B1 ctor
   Start B2 ctor
      A ctor (in B's ctor code)
   End B2 ctor
End C ctor

Now consider virtual inheritance in

class A;
class B1 : virtual A;
class B2 : virtual A;
class C: B1,B2 

One order of event is

Start C ctor
   Start B1 ctor
      // NO A ctor
   End B1 ctor
   Start B2 ctor
      // NO A ctor
   End B2 ctor

   A ctor // not B's code!
End C ctor

It's possible that A is constructed before B1 and B2, but that's irrelevant. The important thing is that A's construction is not happening during the construction of the other base classes. That code is simply not executed, and cannot be executed, because the virtually inherited base class sub-object of type A is part of and under the control of the most derived class which is not accessible from B1 and B2's code; indeed, the C is not even fully constructed at the point in time B1 or B2 are being constructed and could potentially attempt creating an A in a C.

  • Here, A is not invoked either from B1 or B2, but from C, but as you mentioned, if A is constructor after B1 and B2 and if constructors of B1 and B2 uses any variables of A, what would be the situation?. I think A has to be constructed first followed by the remaining. Kindly clarify – infinite loop Aug 15 '17 at 15:09
  • @infiniteloop Sounds reasonable. It would indeed mean that the virtual base must be constructed before any of the derived members. – Peter A. Schneider Aug 18 '17 at 0:50

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