47

I want to get a 2-D torch.Tensor with size [a,b] filled with values from a uniform distribution (in range [r1,r2]) in PyTorch.

2
  • 1
    idk if it's just me but I find that torch.rand is very bad naming. I'd have no idea if it's Gaussian or Uniform without looking at the docs (that btw take ages to load for some reason on a browser). Jul 13, 2020 at 16:08
  • 3
    scratch my previous comment. Use this: r2 = torch.torch.distributions.Uniform(low=lb, high=ub).sample((num_samples,Din)) Jul 15, 2020 at 16:44

9 Answers 9

68

If U is a random variable uniformly distributed on [0, 1], then (r1 - r2) * U + r2 is uniformly distributed on [r1, r2].

Thus, you just need:

(r1 - r2) * torch.rand(a, b) + r2

Alternatively, you can simply use:

torch.FloatTensor(a, b).uniform_(r1, r2)

To fully explain this formulation, let's look at some concrete numbers:

r1 = 2 # Create uniform random numbers in half-open interval [2.0, 5.0)
r2 = 5

a = 1  # Create tensor shape 1 x 7
b = 7

We can break down the expression (r1 - r2) * torch.rand(a, b) + r2 as follows:

  1. torch.rand(a, b) produces an a x b (1x7) tensor with numbers uniformly distributed in the range [0.0, 1.0).
x = torch.rand(a, b)
print(x)
# tensor([[0.5671, 0.9814, 0.8324, 0.0241, 0.2072, 0.6192, 0.4704]])
  1. (r1 - r2) * torch.rand(a, b) produces numbers distributed in the uniform range [0.0, -3.0)
print((r1 - r2) * x)
tensor([[-1.7014, -2.9441, -2.4972, -0.0722, -0.6216, -1.8577, -1.4112]])
  1. (r1 - r2) * torch.rand(a, b) + r2 produces numbers in the uniform range [5.0, 2.0)
print((r1 - r2) * x + r2)
tensor([[3.2986, 2.0559, 2.5028, 4.9278, 4.3784, 3.1423, 3.5888]])

Now, let's break down the answer suggested by @Jonasson: (r2 - r1) * torch.rand(a, b) + r1

  1. Again, torch.rand(a, b) produces (1x7) numbers uniformly distributed in the range [0.0, 1.0).
x = torch.rand(a, b)
print(x)
# tensor([[0.5671, 0.9814, 0.8324, 0.0241, 0.2072, 0.6192, 0.4704]])
  1. (r2 - r1) * torch.rand(a, b) produces numbers uniformly distributed in the range [0.0, 3.0).
print((r2 - r1) * x)
# tensor([[1.7014, 2.9441, 2.4972, 0.0722, 0.6216, 1.8577, 1.4112]])
  1. (r2 - r1) * torch.rand(a, b) + r1 produces numbers uniformly distributed in the range [2.0, 5.0)
print((r2 - r1) * x + r1)
tensor([[3.7014, 4.9441, 4.4972, 2.0722, 2.6216, 3.8577, 3.4112]])

In summary, (r1 - r2) * torch.rand(a, b) + r2 produces numbers in the range [r2, r1), while (r2 - r1) * torch.rand(a, b) + r1 produces numbers in the range [r1, r2).

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  • 8
    shouldn't it be the other way round? I.e. (r2-r1)*torch.rand(a,b) + r1?
    – Jonasson
    Nov 5, 2018 at 12:11
  • 1
    Isn’t it the same?
    – BiBi
    Nov 5, 2018 at 12:32
  • @Jonasson: I think your answer is the better one. Jan 5, 2020 at 22:15
  • 1
    @stackoverflowuser2010 any single value in a continuous distribution has zero probability, so PDF's defined on a closed, open, or half open interval are all equivalent.
    – iacob
    Mar 12, 2021 at 12:39
  • 1
    @CharlieParker there is: torch.distributions.uniform.Uniform()
    – iacob
    Mar 12, 2021 at 12:39
25
torch.FloatTensor(a, b).uniform_(r1, r2)
3
  • 1
    While the accepted answer goes into more detail on different methods, and how they work, this answer is the simplest. Mar 7, 2020 at 22:06
  • 1
    I still don't understand why there isn't something like torch.uniform like there is is for Numpy. Jul 13, 2020 at 16:07
  • 1
    @CharlieParker there is: torch.distributions.uniform.Uniform()
    – iacob
    Mar 12, 2021 at 12:43
6

Utilize the torch.distributions package to generate samples from different distributions.

For example to sample a 2d PyTorch tensor of size [a,b] from a uniform distribution of range(low, high) try the following sample code

import torch
a,b = 2,3   #dimension of the pytorch tensor to be generated
low,high = 0,1 #range of uniform distribution

x = torch.distributions.uniform.Uniform(low,high).sample([a,b]) 
2

To get a uniform random distribution, you can use

torch.distributions.uniform.Uniform()

example,

import torch
from torch.distributions import uniform

distribution = uniform.Uniform(torch.Tensor([0.0]),torch.Tensor([5.0]))
distribution.sample(torch.Size([2,3])

This will give the output, tensor of size [2, 3].

2

This answer uses NumPy to first produce a random matrix and then converts the matrix to a PyTorch tensor. I find the NumPy API to be easier to understand.

import numpy as np

torch.from_numpy(np.random.uniform(low=r1, high=r2, size=(a, b)))
0
2

Please Can you try something like:

import torch as pt
pt.empty(2,3).uniform_(5,10).type(pt.FloatTensor)
1

PyTorch has a number of distributions built in. You can build a tensor of the desired shape with elements drawn from a uniform distribution like so:

from torch.distributions.uniform import Uniform

shape = 3,4
r1, r2 = 0,1

x = Uniform(r1, r2).sample(shape) 
0
0

See this for all distributions: https://pytorch.org/docs/stable/distributions.html#torch.distributions.uniform.Uniform

This is the way I found works:

# generating uniform variables

import numpy as np

num_samples = 3
Din = 1
lb, ub = -1, 1

xn = np.random.uniform(low=lb, high=ub, size=(num_samples,Din))
print(xn)

import torch

sampler = torch.distributions.Uniform(low=lb, high=ub)
r = sampler.sample((num_samples,Din))

print(r)

r2 = torch.torch.distributions.Uniform(low=lb, high=ub).sample((num_samples,Din))

print(r2)

# process input
f = nn.Sequential(OrderedDict([
    ('f1', nn.Linear(Din,Dout)),
    ('out', nn.SELU())
]))
Y = f(r2)
print(Y)

but I have to admit I don't know what the point of generating sampler is and why not just call it directly as I do in the one liner (last line of code).

Comments:


Reference:

0

Pytorch (now?) has a random integer function that allows:

torch.randint(low=r1, high=r2, size=(1,), **kwargs)

and returns uniformly sampled random integers of shape size in range [r1, r2).

https://pytorch.org/docs/stable/generated/torch.randint.html

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