1

I'm trying to use the following code as a safe way to call an async service from within the constructor of my viewmodel as suggested in this post. Problem is, nothing from within the body of the this.WhenActivated ever fires, any ideas why?

here is my code:

class MainViewModel : ReactiveObject, ISupportsActivation, IMainViewModel
{
    private IDataService _dataService;

    private Part _part;

    public Part MyPart
    {
        get { return _part; }
        set { this.RaiseAndSetIfChanged(ref _part, value); }
    }

    public MainViewModel(IDataService dataService)
    {
        _dataService = dataService;

        this.WhenActivated(disposables =>
        {
            _dataService.GetPart("9176900515")
                .ToObservable()
                .Subscribe(
                    result => { MyPart = result; },
                    exception => { LogMe.Log<string>(exception.Message); }
                )
                .DisposeWith(disposables);
        });
    }

    private readonly ViewModelActivator activator = new ViewModelActivator();
    ViewModelActivator ISupportsActivation.Activator
    {
        get { return activator; }
    }

}

2 Answers 2

4

To make WhenActivated work inside a view model, the view model has to be the ViewModel of a view that implements IViewFor<MainViewModel>.

MainViewModel's WhenActivated will then be called by the view's WhenActvated.

Update:

This is done in WPF, but it's supported on all platforms (WPF, UWP, Xamarin).

The view implements IViewFor<TViewModel>. By best practices the ViewModel property is a DependencyProperty (or BindableProperty in Xam.Forms).

public partial class MainWindow : Window, IViewFor<MainViewModel>
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        this.WhenActivated(d =>
        {
        // This will be called
    });
    }

    public MainViewModel ViewModel
    {
        get => (MainViewModel)GetValue(ViewModelProperty);
        set => SetValue(ViewModelProperty, value);
    }
    public static readonly DependencyProperty ViewModelProperty = DependencyProperty.Register(nameof(ViewModel), typeof(MainViewModel), typeof(MainWindow), new PropertyMetadata(null));

    object IViewFor.ViewModel
    {
        get => ViewModel;
        set => ViewModel = value as MainViewModel;
    }
}

The WhenActivated in the VM will now be called when WhenActivated is called in the view.

class MainViewModel : ReactiveObject, ISupportsActivation
{
    public ViewModelActivator Activator => _activator;
    private ViewModelActivator _activator = new ViewModelActivator();

    public MainViewModel()
    {
        this.WhenActivated(d =>
        {
            // This will be called
        });
    }
}
2
  • Is this only for WPF apps? This <link> only mentions WPF and I can't get it to work. Too much boilerplate causing too many new red squigglies. I can't find a full example anywhere. Jun 5, 2017 at 19:59
  • Hi, in my scenario, WhenActivated never fires in the VM, only in the view. Nov 16, 2021 at 4:26
1

Implementing the ViewModel

For one, the WhenActivated pattern is described here: https://reactiveui.net/docs/handbook/when-activated/

WhenActivated is a way to track disposables. Besides that, it can be used to defer the setup of a ViewModel until it's truly required. WhenActivated also gives us an ability to start or stop reacting to hot observables, like a background task that periodically pings a network endpoint or an observable updating users current location. Moreover, one can use WhenActivated to trigger startup logic when the ViewModel comes on stage.

That part of the pattern seems already done right in the question.

Implementing the View

For your ViewModel to be activated, you have to fully follow a specific pattern which is provided in https://reactiveui.net/docs/getting-started/#create-views

Here are the key areas:

public partial class MainWindow : IViewFor<AppViewModel>
{
    // Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for ViewModel.
    // This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
    public static readonly DependencyProperty ViewModelProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("ViewModel",
            typeof(AppViewModel), typeof(MainWindow),
            new PropertyMetadata(null));

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        ViewModel = new AppViewModel();

    // ....
    }

    // ....

    // Our main view model instance.
    public AppViewModel ViewModel
    {
        get => (AppViewModel)GetValue(ViewModelProperty);
        set => SetValue(ViewModelProperty, value);
    }

    // This is required by the interface IViewFor, you always just set it to use the
    // main ViewModel property. Note on XAML based platforms we have a control called
    // ReactiveUserControl that abstracts this.
    object IViewFor.ViewModel
    {
        get => ViewModel;
        set => ViewModel = (AppViewModel)value;
    }
}

Notice that the framework will notice the link from that specific MainWindow instance to that specific AppViewModel instance when the ViewModel setter is called:

ViewModel = new AppViewModel();
3
  • That doesn't work. Setting the ViewModel doesn't trigger activation. Oct 10, 2019 at 8:01
  • Vague question yields vague answer. Perhaps sharing your code on a gist may help someone help you. (I'm not using ReactiveUI at the moment, now on C++/PCL/OpenCV/C/Linux, might use ReactiveUI again in 6-12 months.) Oct 10, 2019 at 14:07
  • 1
    I've found my answer. We need to call this.WhenActivated(() => { }) from the constructor. Oct 10, 2019 at 16:49

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