I'm trying to figure out how to deal with 'Single navigation property case' described in this doc:

Let's say we have 2 models.

class School
{
   public ICollection<Child> Childrens {get; set;}
   ...
}

and

class Child
{
    public int Id {get; set;}
    ...
}

So it's many-to-one relationship created by convention, without explicit foreign key in a Child.

So the question is if we have Child instance and know School.Id is there a way to update this relation without extra call to database to obtain School instance.

  • Unless your Child has a navigation property/parent id to the parent, you can't do that (that's: w/o a raw query). ORM is about Object Relationships. But w/o loading the parent first, you don't even know if 7352 is a valid parent id, so you'll have to do it at one point anyways or get an hard to parse exception from the database provider when doing SaveChanges() – Tseng Jun 2 '17 at 15:52
  • It's unclear what are you trying to achieve - change the parent of an existing child? – Ivan Stoev Jun 2 '17 at 15:58
  • @Tseng Sorry, I'm confused a bit. 7352 it's just a child Id, not parent. And there is many-to-one relation for showing school could have many kids. I assuming that even with fact that I don't have direct ParentId inside Child EF still create it implicitly for many-to-one relationship. – Ph0en1x Jun 2 '17 at 15:58
  • Then the parent id whatever it is. Doing this in a single query is only possible if Child has a navigation property to Parent, or a foreign key to the parent, i.e ctx.Childs.Add(new Child { ParentId = 5 }) and ParentId is a configured principal (or foreign key) for the m:1/1:m relationship, then you could – Tseng Jun 2 '17 at 16:02
  • @Ph0en1x But the existing kid should already have parent school, right? You can't create a new kid just by Id. The stub technique worked in EF6 for adding link to explicit many-to-many relationship, but here that's not the case (and EF Core does not support currently many-to-many with implicit link table). – Ivan Stoev Jun 2 '17 at 16:02

So the question is if we have Child instance and know School.Id is there a way to update this relation without extra call to database to obtain School instance.

Yes, it's possible. You can create a fake stub School entity instance with Id only, Attach it to the DbContext (this way telling the EF that it is existing), Attach the Child instance for the same reason, and then add the Child to the parent collection and call SaveChanges:

Child child = ...;
var schoolId = ...;

var school = new School { Id = schoolId };
context.Attach(school);
context.Attach(child);
school.Childrens.Add(child);
context.SaveChanges();

Update: Actually there is another cleaner way, since even if the entity has no navigation or FK property, EF Core allows you to access/modify the so called Shadow Properties

Shadow properties are properties that do not exist in your entity class. The value and state of these properties is maintained purely in the Change Tracker.

as soon as you know the name. Which in your case, without configuration would be by convention "SchoolId".

So no fake School entity instance is needed, just make sure the Child is attached and then simply set the shadow property through ChangeTracker API:

context.Attach(child);
context.Entry(child).Property("SchoolId").CurrentValue = schoolId;
context.SaveChanges();
  • Didn't thought about doing it that way. Personally I think it's not very reliable though. Won't it create a new school in case schoolId doesn't exist? And also create all kind of other weird behavior when it's queried later one, because the references for the school will be taken from the tracked cache? – Tseng Jun 2 '17 at 17:02
  • @Tseng Indeed. The caller must be absolutely sure both entities exist. And the DbContext should be short lived instance just for this operation. What about reliability, if one of the entities does not exist, the caller will get DbUpdateException and no change will be made to the database. Actually the above sequence of operations generates a single UPDATE command :) – Ivan Stoev Jun 2 '17 at 17:04

Based on the updated question

No, there isn't ANY way you could do that by using ORM and strong typing that the ORM offers you, w/o

  • Two-Way Navigation Property
  • At least a ForeignKey/Principal property(SchoolId on Child)
  • Having a shadow foreign key to the parent
  • performing a raw query (which beats the idea of having ORM for strong typing) and being DB agnostic at the same time

    // Bad!! Database specific dialect, no strong typing 
    ctx.Database.ExecuteSqlCommandAsync("UPDATE Childs SET schoolId = {0}", schoolId);
    

When you choose to use an ORM you have to accept certain technical limitations of the ORM framework in question.

If you want to follow Domain Driven Design (DDD) and remove all db specific fields form your entities, it won't be easy to use your domain models as entities.

DDD and ORM don't have very good synergies, there are way better approaches for this, but require a different architectural approach (namely: CQRS+ES (Command Query Responsibility Segregation with Event Sourcing).

This works much better with DDD, since the Events from the EventSourcing are just simple (and immutable) message classes which can be stored as serialized JSON in the database and replayed to reconstruct the domain entity's state. But that's a different story and one could write whole books about this topic.

Old Answer

The above scenario is only possible in a single DB operation, if your Child objects a navigation property/"back reference" to the parent.

class School
{
   public ICollection<Child> Childrens {get; set;}
   ...
}

and

class Child
{
    public int Id {get; set;}
    // this is required if you want do it in a single operation
    public int SchoolId { get; set; }
    // this one is optional
    public School { get; set; }
    ...
}

Then you can do something like:

ctx.Childs.Add(new Child { Id = 7352, SchoolId = 5,  ... });

Of course you first have to know the school Id and know it's valid, otherwise the operation will throw an exception if SchoolId is an invalid value, so I wouldn't recommend this approach.

If you only have the childId and not adding a whole new child you'll still have to get the child first.

// childId = 7352
var child = ctx.Childs.FirstOrDefault(c => c.Id == childId);
// or use ctx.Childs.Find(childId); if there is a chance that 
// some other operation already loaded this child and it's tracked

// schoolId = 5 for example
child.SchoolId = schoolId;
ctx.SaveChanges();
  • ctx.Childs.Add will ignore the Id and will try to add new Child record. – Ivan Stoev Jun 2 '17 at 16:12
  • Yes, it's for adding a new Child. For changing the school, there is no a way around at least retrieving the Child object once (with a raw query being the exception, but that beats the purpose of having ORM in the first place). But he can save the School query in any case with a parent leading navigation property or foreign key (SchoolId here) – Tseng Jun 2 '17 at 16:14
  • docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/modeling/relationships in this doc there is a case described - called 'single navigation property', so in this case there is no explicit BlogId inside Post, however I'm pretty confident that it's created in a table. So my question was about this case. I thought that there is a way exists, which will change only this "implicit" BlogId when adding post to a Blog.Posts collection. – silent_coder Jun 2 '17 at 16:19
  • @silent_coder, check again the sample, there is the property BlogId inside Post as well. – E-Bat Jun 2 '17 at 16:23
  • 1
    @E-Bat: Well the actual recommendation is not to use the entities for any outside of the DbContext. Not for domain models, not for webapi, not to be used as Dto and always have separate classes for each of these types. Everything else will end up being messy or Db specific stuff (Id fields) leaking into other layers of your application – Tseng Jun 2 '17 at 16:47

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