4

I am trying to make a stacked horizontal bar chart with a specified size, title, and legend location in Jupyter Notebooks. When I use other Stack Overflow solutions I get several graphs printed out instead of just one. Here's a simplified example:

import pandas as pd
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
a = [3,5,4,2,1]
b = [3,4,5,2,1]
c = [3,5,4,6,1]
df = pd.DataFrame({'a' : a,'b' : b, 'c' : c})
df.plot.barh(stacked=True);

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
fig.set_size_inches(6,6)

ax.set_title("My ax title")
#plt.title("My plt title") # This seems to be identical to ax.set_title
# Which is prefered?
ax.legend(loc='upper left')

plt.show()

This code gives me the following two plots. The plot is what I'm looking for but my size and legend location are ignored and the title was put on a second graph that I don't want.

enter image description hereenter image description here

Note: I'm using plot.barh from pandas because I got it to work but I would be just as happy to do it directly from matplotlib.

4

You can assign the return object from the plot to the variable ax. Then do what you wanted.

a = [3,5,4,2,1]
b = [3,4,5,2,1]
c = [3,5,4,6,1]
df = pd.DataFrame({'a' : a,'b' : b, 'c' : c})
ax = df.plot.barh(stacked=True);

ax.figure.set_size_inches(6,6)

ax.set_title("My ax title")
ax.legend(loc='upper left')

enter image description here


Or alternatively, you could have referenced your created ax in the plot call.

a = [3,5,4,2,1]
b = [3,4,5,2,1]
c = [3,5,4,6,1]
df = pd.DataFrame({'a' : a,'b' : b, 'c' : c})

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
fig.set_size_inches(6,6)

df.plot.barh(stacked=True, ax=ax);

ax.set_title("My ax title")
ax.legend(loc='upper left')

enter image description here

2

You are creating the plot using

df.plot.barh(stacked=True)

Then again you are creating an empty plot using

fig, ax = plt.subplots()

Get rid of that and that will take care of the second empty plot

You can pass the parameters inside plot like

df.plot.barh(stacked=True,title = "My ax title", figsize = (6,6))
  • 1
    This is perfectly accurate. – piRSquared Jun 2 '17 at 23:38

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