3

I have a question concerning the usage of structs in OpenCL on an Intel CPU. My current kernel accesses two buffers using a struct in the following way:

struct pair {
    float first;
    float second;
};

inline const float f(const struct pair param) {
    return param.first * param.second;
}

inline const struct pair access_func(__global float const * const a, __global float const * const b, const int i) {
    struct pair res = {
            a[i],
            b[i]
    };
    return res;
}

// slow
__kernel ...(__global float const * const a, __global float const * const b)
{
 // ...

 x = f( access_func( a, b, i ) );

 // ...
}

When I alter the kernel in the following way it runs much faster:

// fast
__kernel ...(__global float const * const a, __global float const * const b)
{
 // ...

 x = a[i] * b[ i ];

 // ...
}

Is there a way to let the Intel compiler do this optimization? The NVIDIA compiler seems to be able to do this, since I don't see a difference in runtime on a GPU.

Thanks in advance!

  • Could it be everything being a const and putting high stress on cache management? – huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jun 3 '17 at 10:49
  • I tried removing const keywords, but that did not solve the issue. – Richard Schulze Jun 5 '17 at 8:43
0

The compiler can't perform optimisations on the memory layout of your data, considering the buffers are shared between the OpenCL device and the host, and/or between multiple kernels on the OpenCL device; the most efficient layout will depend on access patterns in the kernel, and those can obviously be different for each kernel.

You'll need to pick your data's memory layout wisely; this is one of the hardest parts of GPU programming. Refer to the OpenCL optimisation guides for each implementation you target to find out what they prefer. Sometimes, inefficient access patterns can be masked by copying from global memory to local memory, and then working from the local copy.

  • 1
    I tried adding the restrict keyword to signal to the compiler that the buffers are not shared, but the issue remains. I understand that the memory layout is important, but is it really the issue here? As I mentioned in my question the problem only occurs on a CPU. Apparently the optimization can be done on a GPU. – Richard Schulze Jun 5 '17 at 8:51
  • x86 CPUs need more instructions to do "horizontal" arithmetic and pack the results appropriately for further processing via SIMD (SSE/AVX), which is what the OpenCL compiler generally compiles down to. GPUs are typically structured fundamentally differently, and are designed to handle this sort of situation well because it's common to have array-of-struct vertex buffers. So the compiler is not rearranging the data, the GPU just handles it more efficiently. CPUs do better with struct-of-arrays layout. (See: SOA vs AOS) – pmdj Jun 5 '17 at 9:31
  • I just checked, and I can't find any horizontal multiply instructions in SSE or AVX, so that'll be why. The compiler is probably generating at least as many "unpack" instructions than multiplies. Data layout matters! – pmdj Jun 5 '17 at 9:41

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