375

I have the following code. I would like to have it such that if price_result equals an integer, let's say 10, then I would like to add two decimal places. So 10 would be 10.00. Or if it equals 10.6 would be 10.60. Not sure how to do this.

price_result = parseFloat(test_var.split('$')[1].slice(0,-1));

14 Answers 14

842

You can use toFixed() to do that

var twoPlacedFloat = parseFloat(yourString).toFixed(2)
  • 13
    Never knew about toFixed() until now. thx learned something new today!!! – user357034 Dec 14 '10 at 1:52
  • 3
    toFixed is quite buggy though. Also, here's a better link than w3schools developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/… – gotofritz Aug 12 '12 at 19:14
  • 114
    but toFixed() returns number as string, if you will compare numbers, you need to use parseFloat again. – Pedro Muniz Mar 27 '13 at 12:14
  • 16
    Use var twoPlacedFloat = + parseFloat(yourString).toFixed(2) to convert to float – Jose Rui Santos Jul 23 '14 at 10:52
  • 10
    Add parens to get a number instead of string: parseFloat((yourString).toFixed(2)); – pvanallen Nov 19 '14 at 22:02
46

When you use toFixed, it always returns the value as a string. This sometimes complicates the code. To avoid that, you can make an alternative method for Number.

Number.prototype.round = function(p) {
  p = p || 10;
  return parseFloat( this.toFixed(p) );
};

and use:

var n = 22 / 7; // 3.142857142857143
n.round(3); // 3.143

or simply:

(22/7).round(3); // 3.143
  • I wrote a shopping cart program and tried using the toFixed() and the round() methods chained to the parseFloat() method. Neither of these methods worked with the parseFloat(). – Chris22 Nov 6 '13 at 12:49
  • This saved me some to-be headaches. +1 just for that. I had no idea it would turn numbers to strings. – Lukas Jun 20 '14 at 16:39
  • @Lukas Is not, if do parseFloat – Vlada Jul 30 '14 at 17:33
  • This returns 2 if I apply to '2.00' number – SD. Apr 9 '15 at 6:16
  • This method is for corrections, not for formatting. For example: 0.1 + 0.2 // 0.30000000000000004 so I need correction for that (0.1+0.2).round() // 0.3 – Vlada Apr 10 '15 at 10:52
41

If you need performance (like in games):

Math.round(number * 100) / 100

It's about 100 times as fast as parseFloat(number.toFixed(2))

http://jsperf.com/parsefloat-tofixed-vs-math-round

  • 4
    With above formula '2.00' returns 2. but I want it to be 2.00. – SD. Apr 9 '15 at 6:08
  • 4
    You can't have it both ways. If you want the output to be a number instead of a string, then you won't get trailing zeros. So you could use the above converted to a string: var twoPlacedFloat = (Math.round(2.002745 * 100) / 100).toFixed(2); – pvanallen Apr 9 '15 at 19:29
  • 1
    WIll the speed increase if I change 100's to 200's? – alashow Aug 13 '17 at 0:32
  • If the number of floating point operations stay the same the speed will be the same, so no – Rob Boerman Aug 13 '17 at 9:24
  • why no simple number * 1 am I missing something maybe 🤔? – ncubica Nov 11 '17 at 5:34
8

To return a number, add another layer of parentheses. Keeps it clean.

var twoPlacedFloat = parseFloat((10.02745).toFixed(2));
  • 2
    Are you missing something in your formula? var twoPlacedFloat = parseFloat(('2.00').toFixed(2)) generates error. – SD. Apr 9 '15 at 6:09
  • sorry, had a string variable instead of a number, which toFixed() needs - fixed now. But Rob's answer using Math.round is something to consider in terms of performance. – pvanallen Apr 9 '15 at 19:26
  • This should be a comment to Vlada's answer. – Rodrirokr Aug 21 '18 at 15:10
2

If your objective is to parse, and your input might be a literal, then you'd expect a float and toFixed won't provide that, so here are two simple functions to provide this:

function parseFloat2Decimals(value) {
    return parseFloat(parseFloat(value).toFixed(2));
}

function parseFloat2Decimals(value,decimalPlaces) {
    return parseFloat(parseFloat(value).toFixed(decimalPlaces));
}
  • 1
    That not work as espected. parseFloat(parseFloat('10.5').toFixed(2)) return 10.5 espected 10.50. Also parseFloat(parseFloat('10.50').toFixed(2)) return 10.5 – MTK Mar 14 at 17:56
  • It's a float though, so 10.5 is equal to 10.50 – Savage Jul 18 at 8:48
  • I know that 10.5 == 10.50 but i need to print to client 10.50 not 10.5 – MTK Jul 18 at 11:29
1

ceil from lodash is probably the best

_.ceil("315.9250488",2) 
_.ceil(315.9250488,2) 
_.ceil(undefined,2)
_.ceil(null,2)
_.ceil("",2)

will work also with a number and it's safe

  • Viable answer if using lodash, I'm currently using underscore.js and currently at 1.9.1 doesn't have a similar function. – Rodrirokr Aug 21 '18 at 15:23
1

@sd Short Answer: There is no way in JS to have Number datatype value with trailing zeros after a decimal.

Long Answer: Its the property of toFixed or toPrecision function of JavaScript, to return the String. The reason for this is that the Number datatype cannot have value like a = 2.00, it will always remove the trailing zeros after the decimal, This is the inbuilt property of Number Datatype. So to achieve the above in JS we have 2 options

  1. Either use data as a string or
  2. Agree to have truncated value with case '0' at the end ex 2.50 -> 2.5. Number Cannot have trailing zeros after decimal
0

Please use below function if you don't want to round off.

function ConvertToDecimal(num) {
    num = num.toString(); //If it's not already a String
    num = num.slice(0, (num.indexOf(".")) + 3); //With 3 exposing the hundredths place
   alert('M : ' +  Number(num)); //If you need it back as a Number    
}
0

For what its worth: A decimal number, is a decimal number, you either round it to some other value or not. Internally, it will approximate a decimal fraction according to the rule of floating point arthmetic and handling. It stays a decimal number (floating point, in JS a double) internally, no matter how you many digits you want to display it with.

To present it for display, you can choose the precision of the display to whatever you want by string conversion. Presentation is a display issue, not a storage thing.

-1

Try this (see comments in code):

function fixInteger(el) {
    // this is element's value selector, you should use your own
    value = $(el).val();
    if (value == '') {
        value = 0;
    }
    newValue = parseInt(value);
    // if new value is Nan (when input is a string with no integers in it)
    if (isNaN(newValue)) {
        value = 0;
        newValue = parseInt(value);
    }
    // apply new value to element
    $(el).val(newValue);
}

function fixPrice(el) {
    // this is element's value selector, you should use your own
    value = $(el).val();
    if (value == '') {
        value = 0;
    }
    newValue = parseFloat(value.replace(',', '.')).toFixed(2);
    // if new value is Nan (when input is a string with no integers in it)
    if (isNaN(newValue)) {
        value = 0;
        newValue = parseFloat(value).toFixed(2);
    }
    // apply new value to element
    $(el).val(newValue);
}
-1

simple javascript string to float

var it_price = chief_double($("#ContentPlaceHolder1_txt_it_price").val());

function chief_double(num){
    var n = parseFloat(num);
    if (isNaN(n)) {
        return "0";
    }
    else {
        return parseFloat(num);
    }
}
-1

The solution that work for me is the following

parseFloat(value)
-1
Solution for FormArray controllers 

Initialize FormArray form Builder

  formInitilize() {
    this.Form = this._formBuilder.group({
      formArray: this._formBuilder.array([this.createForm()])
    });
  }

Create Form

  createForm() {
    return (this.Form = this._formBuilder.group({
      convertodecimal: ['']
    }));
  }

Set Form Values into Form Controller

  setFormvalues() {
    this.Form.setControl('formArray', this._formBuilder.array([]));
    const control = <FormArray>this.resourceBalanceForm.controls['formArray'];
    this.ListArrayValues.forEach((x) => {
      control.push(this.buildForm(x));
    });
  }

  private buildForm(x): FormGroup {
    const bindvalues= this._formBuilder.group({
      convertodecimal: x.ArrayCollection1? parseFloat(x.ArrayCollection1[0].name).toFixed(2) : '' // Option for array collection
// convertodecimal: x.number.toFixed(2)    --- option for two decimal value 
    });

    return bindvalues;
  }
-3

I've got other solution.

You can use round() to do that instead toFixed()

var twoPlacedFloat = parseFloat(yourString).round(2)
  • Why the downvote? – Austin Henley Oct 4 '12 at 20:07
  • 6
    @AustinHenley I tried using round() and it didn't work. That's probably why people are down voting. He may be refering to Math.round() – Nathan Dec 21 '12 at 22:51
  • @Nathan it needs to be used inline, after parseFloat() as I've updated the answer by @zsalzbank – Alastair Jun 1 '13 at 12:34
  • 3
    No, it doesn't work. You may try Math.round(parseFloat(yourString), 2); – Augie Gardner Jul 17 '14 at 21:23
  • 4
    .round() like this definitely does not work – Oscar Godson Aug 22 '14 at 0:17

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