5

I have the following asp.net core LINQ code:

    List<UserSearchResult> results = await db.ApplicationUsers.Where(u => u.Name.StartsWith(name) && !u.Deleted && u.AppearInSearch)
                                    .OrderByDescending(u => u.Verified)
                                    .ThenBy(u => u.DateAdded) // Added to prevent duplication of results in different pages
                                    .Skip(page * recordsInPage)
                                    .Take(recordsInPage)
                                    .Select(u => new UserSearchResult()
                                    {
                                        Name = u.Name,
                                        Verified = u.Verified,
                                        PhotoURL = u.PhotoURL,
                                        UserID = u.Id,
                                        Subdomain = u.Subdomain
                                    }).ToListAsync();

Unfortunately this translates to the following:

SELECT [t].[Name], [t].[Verified], [t].[PhotoURL], [t].[Id], [t].[Subdomain]  FROM (      SELECT [u0].*      FROM [AspNetUsers] AS [u0]      WHERE ((([u0].[Name] LIKE @__name_0 + N'%' AND (CHARINDEX(@__name_0, [u0].[Name]) = 1)) OR (@__name_0 = N'')) AND ([u0].[Deleted] = 0)) AND ([u0].[AppearInSearch] = 1)      ORDER BY [u0].[Verified] DESC, [u0].[DateAdded]      OFFSET @__p_1 ROWS FETCH NEXT @__p_2 ROWS ONLY  ) AS [t]

I wonder why it has this part:

(CHARINDEX(@__name_0, [u0].[Name]) = 1)) OR (@__name_0 = N''))

and not only LIKE

Thanks a lot

  • 2
    You should tag this with entity-framework-core. This has been tracked by #474 - Query: Improve translation of String's StartsWith, EndsWith and Contains. AFAIK support for native SQL LIke is already added and will be available in v2 – Ivan Stoev Jun 4 '17 at 14:46
  • @IvanStoev I have modified the tag. I tried to upgrade to 2.0 but I couldn't do it for entity framework alone and had to do it to whole project.json but problems arose. Can you suggest an alternative please? Thanks a lot. – Techy Jun 4 '17 at 16:26
  • v2 is not officially released anyway. Until then, unfortunately the only workaround I can think of (if it's critical for you) is to use db.ApplicationUsers.FromSql(...).OrderByDescending(...)...., i.e. apply Where with LIKE at SQL level and do the rest in LINQ :( – Ivan Stoev Jun 4 '17 at 16:33
  • @IvanStoev Thanks a lot your great! but I'm afraid this would expose my application to SQL Injection since it uses raw sql, don't you think so? Thanks. – Techy Jun 4 '17 at 16:41
  • FromSql allows you to use parameters, so no injection. The reason I don't like it because it breaks ORM encapsulation and db independence, hence the :( at the end of my previous comment :) Again, use it only if it's critical. – Ivan Stoev Jun 4 '17 at 17:04
7

The rules for SQL translation in EF Core are still unclear, far from perfect, under discussion and are changing with every even minor release.

The translation of StartsWith, EndsWith and Contains has been discussed and changed several times - for instance, issue #474: Query: Improve translation of String's StartsWith, EndsWith and Contains). The translation of StartsWith has been even changed in the latest official v1.1.2 release, so the v1.1.1 translation

(CHARINDEX(@__name_0, [u0].[Name]) = 1)) OR (@__name_0 = N''))

now will be something like

[u0].[Name] LIKE @__name_0 + '%' AND (CHARINDEX(@__name_0, [u0].[Name]) = 1)) OR (@__name_0 = N''))

The idea is with LIKE condition to allow query optimizer to use the index, and then do the slow filtering with the second condition like before (it's all about handling correctly (similar to C#) the wildcard characters inside the search string as well as empty search string).

So you may try upgrading and see if it helps. The upcoming v2 when released will provide more natural support for db specific operators like LIKE etc.

Another workaround currently (if the above is really the performance bottleneck) is to build the query filtering part directly with SQL and the rest with LINQ (in contrast with EF6, EF Core allows that):

var results = await db.ApplicationUsers
    //.Where(u => u.Name.StartsWith(name) && !u.Deleted && u.AppearInSearch)
    .FromSql("select * from ApplicationUsers where Name like {0}", name + "%")
    .Where(!u.Deleted && u.AppearInSearch)
    .OrderByDescending(u => u.Verified)
    .ThenBy(u => u.DateAdded) // Added to prevent duplication of results in different pages
    .Skip(page * recordsInPage)
    .Take(recordsInPage)
    .Select(u => new UserSearchResult()
    {
        Name = u.Name,
        Verified = u.Verified,
        PhotoURL = u.PhotoURL,
        UserID = u.Id,
        Subdomain = u.Subdomain
     }).ToListAsync();

Note that FromSql method supports parameters, so SQL injection should not be a concern. Still you need to know the table name, column names and the concrete database SQL syntax - something that is supposed to be abstracted by the ORM for you.

| improve this answer | |
  • FromSql defeats the whole purpose of EntityFramework as an abstraction for the database. – thomasgalliker Jul 27 at 7:10
  • @thomasgalliker That's true, but EF with its limitations/bugs does that as well. Users of your app don't care about abstractions, they want performance :) Btw, this post is outdated, now EF Core has EF.Like method, so this was workarouhd for the time of writing. Your users also can't wait MS to fix their bugs/limitations :) – Ivan Stoev Jul 27 at 9:21
  • I totally agree on the point that user's don't care about the internals of your backend. If you're ok with giving up ORM principles, I would rather stick to plain SQL. Don't bother with EFCore if performance is king. It's an architectural decision. I can live with the performance impacts of EFCore but I don't want to lose the nice maintainability advantage. My experience is that when you start using SQL in EF, simple renames potentially break your code which leads to bugs and unpleasant users. – thomasgalliker Jul 27 at 11:14
6

Entity Framework provides special function EF.Functions.Like to use it for LINQ expressions with standard SQL LIKE syntax. For StartWith pattern an expression will be like this:

var likeExpression = name+"%";
... await db.ApplicationUsers.Where(u => EF.Functions.Like(u.Name,likeExpression)...
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I agree with R.Titov and I want to mention, that is also appropriate to add index for u.Name like: modelBuilder.Entity<ApplicationUsers>().HasIndex(o => o.Name); in DbContext class in OnModelCreating() method. – Martin Zaloga Aug 27 at 7:32

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