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I have a problem setting up type classes in an algebraic type hierarchy.

I have the following traits:

trait Field[F]{...}

trait VectorSpace3[V,F] extends Field[F]{...}

Know I want to provide implementations:

trait DoubleIsField extends Field[Double]{
   ...
}

trait DoubleTurple3IsVectorSpace3 extends VectorSpace3[(Double,Double,Double), Double] with Field[Double]{
   ...
}
trait MyOtherClassIsVectorSpace3 extends VectorSpace3[MyOtherClass, Double] with Field[Double]{
   ...
} 

//now the implicits
implicit object DoubleIsField extends DoubleIsField  
implicit object DoubleTurple3IsVectorSpace3 extends DoubleTurple3IsVectorSpace3 with DoubleIsField
implicit object MyOtherClassIsVectorSpace3 extends MyOtherClassIsVectorSpace3 with DoubleIsField 

The last two implicits lead to ambiguity: DoubleIsField is a part of 3 implicit values, code does not compile. How to deal with this issue in scala ?

EDIT:

Error:

ambiguous implicit values:
[error]  both object DoubleIsField in object TypeClasses of type 
Russoul.lib.common.TypeClasses.DoubleIsField.type
[error]  and object DoubleTurple3IsVectorSpace3 in object TypeClasses of type 
Russoul.lib.common.TypeClasses.DoubleTurple3IsVectorSpace3.type
[error]  match expected type Russoul.lib.common.TypeClasses.Field[...Double]

EDIT2:

 def func()(implicit env: Field[Double]): Unit ={

 }

 func()

Full testing program:

object Test extends App {

trait Field[F]{

}

trait VectorSpace3[V,F] extends Field[F]{

}
trait DoubleIsField extends Field[Double]{

}

trait DoubleTurple3IsVectorSpace3 extends VectorSpace3[(Double,Double,Double), Double] with Field[Double]{

}


//now the implicits
implicit object DoubleIsField extends DoubleIsField
implicit object DoubleTurple3IsVectorSpace3 extends DoubleTurple3IsVectorSpace3 with DoubleIsField


def func()(implicit env: Field[Double]): Unit ={

}

func()

}
  • 1
    DoubleIsField (the first declaration, not the object) is not declared as a trait or class. What is the compiler error message? – Mike Allen Jun 4 '17 at 15:22
  • @MikeAllen sorry, it is trait. It is not real code. I just wrote simplified version to show the problem – Russoul Jun 4 '17 at 17:39
  • @MikeAllen see Edit for error – Russoul Jun 4 '17 at 17:41
  • Do you have implicit function arguments somewhere in your code? If so, can you show us what they look like? – Mike Allen Jun 4 '17 at 17:47
  • @MikeAllen see new edit – Russoul Jun 4 '17 at 17:58
1

(Updated in light of your recent comment...)

The problem is the definition of the following function:

def func()(implicit env: Field[Double]): Unit = {
  // ...
}

Your issue is that you have multiple implicit values of this type in the same scope, and so the compiler cannot know which one to provide (they are all implicit values that can be expressed as having the type Field[Double]).

The whole point about implicit argument values is that there be a single value that can be identified by the compiler; if it can't identify one, it can't read your mind and pick the right one, nor would you want it to pick one at random.

The options you have available are as follows:

  • Forego using implicit argument values and pass values to your function explicitly.
  • Change the definition of the functions with implicit arguments to be types having unique implicit values.
  • Make do with a single implicit object definition. (Apologies for missing this off the list initially.)
  • Of course I had to move those implicits to different scopes... Thank you. One little extra question: suppose I have a function : – Russoul Jun 4 '17 at 18:27
  • def func()(implicit composed: Field[...] with ExtraOperation[...]){...} And I have separate implicits for both Field and ExtraOperation. Is there a better way of providing a mixin than creating an extra object holding Field with ExtraOperation ? – Russoul Jun 4 '17 at 18:31
  • @Russoul Given that declaration, an implicit of type, say, Field[X] would not be matched to an implicit argument of type Field[X] with ExtraOperation[Y] if it didn't mix in the latter type. I think you might be overusing implicit arguments. What are you trying to do? – Mike Allen Jun 4 '17 at 18:40
  • I am writing a simple library for basic algebraic calculations. And I use those kind of constructs to build the library : @immutable case class ComplexOverField[A](real: A, imaginary:A)(implicit ev: Field[A] with Euclidean[A]) – Russoul Jun 4 '17 at 18:45
  • BTW, an alternative to using implicit arguments is to use partially applied functions. For example, say you have def greet(greeting: String, name: String) = s"$greeting $name". You could have val hi = greeting("Hi", _:String). So hi("Fred") is the same as greet("Hi", "Fred"). Would that be of use to you? – Mike Allen Jun 4 '17 at 18:45

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