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According to this link, in order to invoke Java methods from native (C++) code using JNI, the GetMethodID function is used to:

"return the method ID for an instance (nonstatic) method of a class or interface."

Consider, as an example, the following constructor of the File class:

public File(Uri uri)

A JNI method signature for this constructor would be:

"Ljava/io/File;.(Landroid.net.Uri;)V"

But, since Uri is an abstract class, is it possible to retrieve the method ID for this constructor using a signature that contains types that are derived from Uri ?

*I am asking this, since I'm using an environment where the actual signature is being automatically created based on the runtime object type, but that seems to fail, but i am not sure if its a limitation of JNI or a bug in the signature creation code, or something else entirely.

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    "is it possible to retrieve the method ID for this constructor using a signature that contains types that are derived from Uri ? ... but that seems to fail in this case." So the answer to your question would appear to be "no". Is that what you are asking? If not, you should clarify the question. – Radiodef Jun 4 '17 at 21:31
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    slightly modified my question. i am not a JNI expert, and i am not sure that it fails just because that is not supported by JNI. – lysergic-acid Jun 4 '17 at 21:33
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    I suspect you'll have to use reflection (class.getConstructors() and check the parameter types) but I'm not a JNI expert either so I can't say for sure. If you use reflection, JNI has a conversion function so you don't have to build a string signature once you have the right Constructor. – Radiodef Jun 4 '17 at 21:42
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The signature of a method is determined by its own source code, not by what you want to call it with. If all you have is the actual argument list rather than the formal parmaeter types, you don't have enough information to generate it at runtime.

But I cannot understand why you would want or need to generate it at runtime in the first place, or why you would want or need to do this via JNI. Maybe you should be looking at java.beans.Statement and friends.

I'm using an environment where the actual signature is being automatically created based on the runtime object type

No you aren't, because it isn't possible. You have misunderstood, or you are attempting the impossible.

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