1

The table 'reading' contains readings taken every 40s, for today. The query returns averages for 180s periods. 'time_stamp' is indexed. The query below returns a reasonable number of rows (a few hundred) but visits ALL rows and get slower the bigger the table gets. WHERE clause does not seem to be restricting it to today's rows only.

EXPLAIN SELECT DATE_FORMAT(time_stamp, '%Y-%m-%dT%T+00:00') , AVG(temp_c) FROM reading WHERE DATE(time_stamp) = CURDATE() GROUP BY round(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(time_stamp) / 180)

Table schema: CREATE TABLE reading ( id bigint(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, time_stamp timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, temp_c float NOT NULL, pressure_hpa float NOT NULL, wind_speed_kt int(11) NOT NULL, wind_dir_degree int(11) NOT NULL, rain_mm float NOT NULL, rain_day_mm float NOT NULL, wind_gust_kt int(11) NOT NULL, humidity float DEFAULT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (id), KEY time_stamp (time_stamp), KEY time_stamp_idx (time_stamp) ) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=1747097 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

Sample data

  • The WHERE goes before the GROUP BY. You could verify this by removing the WHERE (or perhaps by the AVG value) :) – SAS Jun 5 '17 at 11:00
  • Also, the query seems to select all the current day's records so could get measurably slower in the afternoons. – SAS Jun 5 '17 at 11:01
  • Could you please let me know what round(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(time_stamp) / 180) does? If you apply UNIX_TIMESTAMP function to time_stamp filed, it doesn't use index. – harshavmb Jun 5 '17 at 11:14
  • @harshavmb round(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(time_stamp) / 180) makes time periods off 180 seconds. – Raymond Nijland Jun 5 '17 at 11:20
  • @quanglewangle can you post the table schema and some example data? – Raymond Nijland Jun 5 '17 at 11:21
2
EXPLAIN SELECT 
    DATE_FORMAT(time_stamp, '%Y-%m-%dT%T+00:00') ,
    AVG(temp_c) 
FROM reading
WHERE DATE(time_stamp) = CURDATE() 
GROUP BY round(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(time_stamp) / 180) 

When the above query is executed, MySQL optimizer isn't interested in index scan (could be because of cost factor) rather full table scan is initiated and the issue appears to be because of WHERE DATE(time_stamp) = CURDATE().

Having changed your where clause to time_stamp >= CURDATE(), I've seen index being used and less number of rows were fetched shunning full scan.

Hence, your final query will be:

EXPLAIN SELECT 
    DATE_FORMAT(time_stamp, '%Y-%m-%dT%T+00:00') ,
    AVG(temp_c) 
FROM reading
WHERE time_stamp >= CURDATE() 
GROUP BY round(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(time_stamp) / 180);

I suspect date(time_stamp) isn't that efficient with index. Similar topic was discussed here (see ypercube's answer).

The above query can be further improved by choosing an alternate of round(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(time_stamp) / 180) as UNIX_TIMESTAMP(timestamp) doesn't use index. But, I'm not trying furthermore.

Hope this helps!

  • 1
    This would make it run faster: INDEX(time_stamp, temp_c) (a "covering" index). – Rick James Jun 5 '17 at 21:43

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.