21

I'm frequently using pandas for merge (join) by using a range condition.

For instance if there are 2 dataframes:

A (A_id, A_value)

B (B_id,B_low, B_high, B_name)

which are big and approximately of the same size (let's say 2M records each).

I would like to make an inner join between A and B, so A_value would be between B_low and B_high.

Using SQL syntax that would be:

SELECT *
FROM A,B
WHERE A_value between B_low and B_high

and that would be really easy, short and efficient.

Meanwhile in pandas the only way (that's not using loops that I found), is by creating a dummy column in both tables, join on it (equivalent to cross-join) and then filter out unneeded rows. That sounds heavy and complex:

A['dummy'] = 1
B['dummy'] = 1
Temp = pd.merge(A,B,on='dummy')
Result = Temp[Temp.A_value.between(Temp.B_low,Temp.B_high)]

Another solution that I had is by applying on each of A value a search function on B by usingB[(x>=B.B_low) & (x<=B.B_high)] mask, but it sounds inefficient as well and might require index optimization.

Is there a more elegant and/or efficient way to perform this action?

  • 2
    This Q&A might be relevant. – Andras Deak Jun 5 '17 at 12:36
  • looks like they use a similar method to the one I suggested myself (dummy columns, cartesian product and mask filter). It's surprising that there is no built-in solution. – Dimgold Jun 5 '17 at 12:44
  • 1
    Did you also look at the accepted answer...? Never learn from questions on Stack Overflow. Although it might be that I'm not realizing that the answer does the same thing, in which case sorry:) – Andras Deak Jun 5 '17 at 12:51
  • 1
    looks like a more memory-optimized solution but yet - not elegant at all :( Thanks! – Dimgold Jun 5 '17 at 12:53
  • Well, yeah, the fact that merge doesn't accept any function arguments suggests that an elegant solution might not be available. But I barely know pandas, so let's hope an expert comes along and proves the opposite:) – Andras Deak Jun 5 '17 at 12:57
33
+50

Setup
Consider the dataframes A and B

A = pd.DataFrame(dict(
        A_id=range(10),
        A_value=range(5, 105, 10)
    ))
B = pd.DataFrame(dict(
        B_id=range(5),
        B_low=[0, 30, 30, 46, 84],
        B_high=[10, 40, 50, 54, 84]
    ))

A

   A_id  A_value
0     0        5
1     1       15
2     2       25
3     3       35
4     4       45
5     5       55
6     6       65
7     7       75
8     8       85
9     9       95

B

   B_high  B_id  B_low
0      10     0      0
1      40     1     30
2      50     2     30
3      54     3     46
4      84     4     84

numpy
The ✌easiest✌ way is to use numpy broadcasting.
We look for every instance of A_value being greater than or equal to B_low while at the same time A_value is less than or equal to B_high.

a = A.A_value.values
bh = B.B_high.values
bl = B.B_low.values

i, j = np.where((a[:, None] >= bl) & (a[:, None] <= bh))

pd.DataFrame(
    np.column_stack([A.values[i], B.values[j]]),
    columns=A.columns.append(B.columns)
)

   A_id  A_value  B_high  B_id  B_low
0     0        5      10     0      0
1     3       35      40     1     30
2     3       35      50     2     30
3     4       45      50     2     30

To address the comments and give something akin to a left join, I appended the part of A that doesn't match.

pd.DataFrame(
    np.column_stack([A.values[i], B.values[j]]),
    columns=A.columns.append(B.columns)
).append(
    A[~np.in1d(np.arange(len(A)), np.unique(i))],
    ignore_index=True, sort=False
)

    A_id  A_value  B_id  B_low  B_high
0      0        5   0.0    0.0    10.0
1      3       35   1.0   30.0    40.0
2      3       35   2.0   30.0    50.0
3      4       45   2.0   30.0    50.0
4      1       15   NaN    NaN     NaN
5      2       25   NaN    NaN     NaN
6      5       55   NaN    NaN     NaN
7      6       65   NaN    NaN     NaN
8      7       75   NaN    NaN     NaN
9      8       85   NaN    NaN     NaN
10     9       95   NaN    NaN     NaN
  • 1
    amazing solution.. can we say that this is a cross join... If I wanted to keep all rows of A only(basically left join on A) then what change would I need to make ? – joel.wilson Jan 31 '18 at 19:41
  • I wanted to reduce the bursting of rows thats happening too. Any thoughts? – joel.wilson Jan 31 '18 at 19:59
  • This is great, I was have the same question as Joel, would it be possible to keep all the values of table A, like a left join? – brandog Jun 26 '18 at 3:38
  • @piRSquared how would you do to keep only rows where A_id == B_id ? We can do it afterwards but I don't think that's the most efficient. In my case, I have an original df of 79k rows, it goes after your operation to 2.3m rows, then when I keep only rows where A_id == B_id, I have 74k rows which is what I expect. Can't this be done all at once ? – yeye Jun 15 '19 at 8:04
  • Found my way: a = A.A_value.values aId = A.A_id.values bId = B.B_id.values bh = B.B_high.values bl = B.B_low.values i, j = np.where((a[:, None] >= bl) & (a[:, None] <= bh) & (aId[:, None] == bId) – yeye Jun 15 '19 at 9:08
2

I don't know how efficient it is, but someone wrote a wrapper that allows you to use SQL syntax with pandas objects. That's called pandasql. The documentation explicitly states that joins are supported. This might be at least easier to read since SQL syntax is very readable.

2

Not sure that is more efficient, however you can use sql directly (from the module sqlite3 for instance) with pandas (inspired from this question) like:

conn = sqlite3.connect(":memory:") 
df2 = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(10, 5), columns=["col1", "col2", "col3", "col4", "col5"])
df1 = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(10, 5), columns=["col1", "col2", "col3", "col4", "col5"])
df1.to_sql("df1", conn, index=False)
df2.to_sql("df2", conn, index=False)
qry = "SELECT * FROM df1, df2 WHERE df1.col1 > 0 and df1.col1<0.5"
tt = pd.read_sql_query(qry,conn)

You can adapt the query as needed in your application

0

lets take a simple example:

df=pd.DataFrame([2,3,4,5,6],columns=['A'])

returns

    A
0   2
1   3
2   4
3   5
4   6

now lets define a second dataframe

df2=pd.DataFrame([1,6,2,3,5],columns=['B_low'])
df2['B_high']=[2,8,4,6,6]

results in

    B_low   B_high
0   1       2
1   6       8
2   2       4
3   3       6
4   5       6

here we go; and we want output to be index 3 and A value 5

df.where(df['A']>=df2['B_low']).where(df['A']<df2['B_high']).dropna()

results in

    A
3   5.0
  • that's not a join, just stacking – Dimgold Jun 15 '17 at 14:33
0

Consider that your A dataframe is

A = pd.DataFrame([[0,2],[1,3],[2,4],[3,5],[4,6]],columns=['A_id', 'A_value'])

and B dataframe is

B = pd.DataFrame([[0,1,2,'a'],[1,4,9,'b'],[2,2,5,'c'],[3,6,7,'d'],[4,8,9,'e']],columns=['B_id', 'B_low', 'B_high', 'B_name'])

using this below you will get the desired output

A = A[(A['A_value']>=B['B_low'])&(A['A_value']<=B['B_high'])]
  • 2
    But A and b are not necessary the same shape and order. Lets say A is 3M records and B is 500K. – Dimgold Jun 15 '17 at 14:31

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