95

Having a friendly debate with a co-worker about this. We have some thoughts about this, but wondering what the SO crowd thinks about this?

  • Do you any other languages have this feature? It seems obvious. – Colonel Panic Jul 7 '15 at 15:00
  • 4
    @ColonelPanic C and C++ have const local variables, which you can initialize with a runtime-computed value. – Crashworks Jan 9 '16 at 11:08
  • 1
    JavaScript 2015 (ES6) has const type. E.g. { const myList = [1,2,3]; }. It's very good programming practice to use this construct. More info: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – andrew.fox Jan 18 '16 at 9:20
  • 1
    For those interested, there's a UserVoice suggestion for this feature. It's currently only sitting at 87 votes, so if you want to see local readonly variables, please go bump it! – Ian Kemp Apr 14 '16 at 6:55
  • 1
    It is not just a language problem. It is a problem of a majority in the C# community including highest rated C# gurus, that they to do not care about const correctness and anything related to it. Resistance is futile. – Patrick Fromberg Jul 29 '16 at 14:20

12 Answers 12

14

One reason is there is no CLR support for a readonly local. Readonly is translated into the CLR/CLI initonly opcode. This flag can only be applied to fields and has no meaning for a local. In fact, applying it to a local will likely produce unverifiable code.

This doesn't mean that C# couldn't do this. But it would give two different meanings to the same language construct. The version for locals would have no CLR equivalent mapping.

  • 44
    It actually has nothing to do with CLI support for the feature, because local variables are in no way exposed to other assemblies. The readonly keyword for fields needs to be supported by the CLI because its effect is visible to other assemblies. All it would mean is the variable only has one assignment in the method at compile time. – Sam Harwell Sep 3 '09 at 2:06
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    I think you've just shifted the question to why the CLR does not support this rather than providing the rational behind it. It does allow for const locals, so it would be reasonable to expect readonly locals as well. – Chad Schouggins Aug 16 '12 at 16:25
  • 8
    An example of this are variable defined in a using statement. They are local ... and readonly (try to assign them, C# will add an error). – Softlion Nov 16 '13 at 10:46
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    -1 In C++ there's no machine code support for const (which in C++ is more like C# readonly than like C# const, although it can play both roles). Yet C++ supports const for local automatic variable. Hence the lack of CLR support for a C# readonly for local variable, is irrelevant. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 14 '14 at 13:00
  • 3
    1. This can easily be a compiler feature, like in C++. CLR support is completely irrelevant. Machine assembly doesn't support it either, so what? 2. (it would) likely produce unverifiable code - I don't see how, but perhaps I am mistaken. 3. it would give two different meanings to the same language construct - I doubt anyone would see this as an issue, since using and out are doing exactly that and the world didn't collapse. – Lou Mar 15 '17 at 10:28
43

I think it's a poor judgement on part of C# architects. readonly modifier on local variables helps maintain program correctness (just like asserts) and can potentially help the compiler optimize code (at least in the case of other languages). The fact that it's disallowed in C# right now, is another argument that some of the "features" of C# are merely an enforcement of personal coding style of its creators.

  • 7
    I agree on the "save the programmer from himself" part, but as for helping the compiler to optimize code, I hold the stance that the compiler can find out very well whether or not a variable changes over the course of the method and optimizes accordingly either way. Placing a 'readonly' flag before something the optimizer recognizes anyways for that purpose does not really benefit, yet potentially mislead. – Cornelius May 10 '11 at 12:37
  • @Cornelius I agree that there are opinions that in some cases the compiler uses data-flow diagram to figure out optimization opportunity regardless of any keyword/modifiers. But saving the programmer from himself from writing incorrect and otherwise unnecessarily unoptimized code may open up that optimization opportunity for compiler. – shuva Nov 16 '18 at 19:37
32

Addressing Jared's answer, it would probably just have to be a compile-time feature - the compiler would prohibit you from writing to the variable after the initial declaration (which would have to include an assignment).

Can I see value in this? Potentially - but not a lot, to be honest. If you can't easily tell whether or not a variable is going to be assigned elsewhere in the method, then your method is too long.

For what it's worth, Java has this feature (using the final modifier) and I've very rarely seen it used other than in cases where it has to be used to allow the variable to be captured by an anonymous inner class - and where it is used, it gives me an impression of clutter rather than useful information.

  • 63
    There's a difference between seeing whether or not a variable is modified in your method by sight and by the compiler. I see no objection to writing a method, stating my intent to not modify a variable, and having the compiler notify me when I accidentally do (perhaps with a typo a month later)! – A. Rex Jan 14 '09 at 18:06
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    On the other hand, in F# all variables are read-only by default, and you have to use the 'mutable' keyword if you want to be able to change them. Since F# is a .NET language, I imagine it does the compile-time checking you describe. – Joel Mueller Jan 14 '09 at 18:43
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    @A.Rex: The question is really whether the benefit of getting the compiler to do that checking is worth the extra "fluff" when reading the code and not actually caring about it. – Jon Skeet Jan 14 '09 at 20:52
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    Consider the following definition int arr[] = new int[numItems];, placed just before a loop that passes arr to an unfamiliar method. Even it's clear that arr always points to the same array, it might not be clear whether that is because there was never any need to make it point elsewhere, or because the called method relies upon its always being the same instance. That distinction may become important if e.g. future code requires that the code deal with arrays of different sizes that aren't known in advance. – supercat Nov 19 '12 at 17:57
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    For local variables that aren't used in closures, readonly wouldn't be overly important. On the other hand, for local variables which are used in closures, readonly would in many cases let the compiler generate more efficient code. Presently, when execution enters a block which contains a closure, the compiler must create a new heap object for the closed-over variables, even if no code which would use the closure is ever executed. If a variable were read-only, code outside the closure could use a normal variable; only when a delegate is created for the closure... – supercat Mar 4 '15 at 21:32
16

A proposal readonly locals and parameters for was briefly discussed by the C# 7 design team. From C# Design Meeting Notes for Jan 21, 2015:

Parameters and locals can be captured by lambdas and thereby accessed concurrently, but there's no way to protect them from shared-mutual-state issues: they can't be readonly.

In general, most parameters and many locals are never intended to be assigned to after they get their initial value. Allowing readonly on them would express that intent clearly.

One problem is that this feature might be an "attractive nuisance". Whereas the "right thing" to do would nearly always be to make parameters and locals readonly, it would clutter the code significantly to do so.

An idea to partly alleviate this is to allow the combination readonly var on a local variable to be contracted to val or something short like that. More generally we could try to simply think of a shorter keyword than the established readonly to express the readonly-ness.

Discussion continues in the C# Language Design repo. Vote to show your support. https://github.com/dotnet/csharplang/issues/188

7

I was that coworker and it wasn't friendly! (just kidding)

I would not eliminate the feature because it's better to write short methods. It's a bit like saying you shouldn't use threads because they're hard. Give me the knife and let me be responsible for not cutting myself.

Personally, I wanted another "var" type keyword like "inv" (invarient) or "rvar" to avoid clutter. I've been studying F# as of late and find the immutable thing appealing.

Never knew Java had this.

5

I would like local readonly variables in the same manner as I like local const variables. But it has less priority than other topics.
Maybe its priority is the same reason for C# designers to not (yet!) implement this feature. But it should be easy (and backward compatible) to support local readonly variables in future versions.

5

It is an oversight for c# language designer. F# has val keyword and it is based on CLR. There is no reason C# can't have the same language feature.

3

Readonly means the only place the instance variable can be set is in the constructor. When declaring a variable locally it doesn't have an instance (it's just in scope), and it can't be touched by the constructor.

  • 5
    That's the current meaning of 'readonly' in C#, but that isn't the question. 'read only' has an English meaning that seems to have intuitive application to a local variable: You can't write to it (after it's been initialized). That seems very much like the meaning when applied to instance variables, so why (as in justification, I think) can't we apply it to local variables? – Spike0xff Oct 22 '15 at 21:16
1

I know, this doesn't answer the why to your question. Anyway, those reading this question might appreciate the code below nonetheless.

If you are really concerned with shooting your self in the foot when overriding a local variable that should only be set once, and you don't want to make it a more globally accessible variable, you could do something like this.

    public class ReadOnly<T>
    {
        public T Value { get; private set; }

        public ReadOnly(T pValue)
        {
            Value = pValue;
        }

        public static bool operator ==(ReadOnly<T> pReadOnlyT, T pT)
        {
            if (object.ReferenceEquals(pReadOnlyT, null))
            {
                return object.ReferenceEquals(pT, null);
            }
            return (pReadOnlyT.Value.Equals(pT));
        }

        public static bool operator !=(ReadOnly<T> pReadOnlyT, T pT)
        {
            return !(pReadOnlyT == pT);
        }
    }

Example usage:

        var rInt = new ReadOnly<int>(5);
        if (rInt == 5)
        {
            //Int is 5 indeed
        }
        var copyValueOfInt = rInt.Value;
        //rInt.Value = 6; //Doesn't compile, setter is private

Maybe not as less code as rvar rInt = 5 but it works.

  • That doesn't help here. This issue with variable 'var' is: { var five = 5 five = 6; Assert.That(five==5) } – Murray May 10 '17 at 7:52
0

You can declare readonly local variables in C#, if you're using the C# interactive compiler csi:

>"C:\Program Files (x86)\MSBuild\14.0\Bin\csi.exe"
Microsoft (R) Visual C# Interactive Compiler version 1.3.1.60616
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Type "#help" for more information.
> readonly var message = "hello";
> message = "goodbye";
(1,1): error CS0191: A readonly field cannot be assigned to (except in a constructor or a variable initializer)

You can also declare readonly local variables in the .csx script format.

  • 5
    Per the error message, message is not a variable here, it's compiled to a field. This is not nitpicking because the distinction clearly exists in interactive C# as well: int x; Console.WriteLine(x) is legal interactive C# (because x is a field and implicitly initialized) but void foo() { int x; Console.WriteLine(x); } is not (because x is a variable and used before it's assigned). Also, Expression<Func<int>> y = x; ((MemberExpression) y.Body).Member.MemberType will reveal that x is really a field and not a local variable. – Jeroen Mostert Jul 12 '16 at 15:32
-2

I think that's because a function that has a readonly variable may never be called, and there's probably something about it going out of scope, and when would you need to?

-3

use const keyword to make read only variable.

reference: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/language-reference/keywords/const

public class SealedTest
{
    static void Main()
    {
        const int c = 707;
        Console.WriteLine("My local constant = {0}", c);
    }
}
  • 4
    const and readonly are not the same thing. – Brian Genisio Oct 18 '17 at 21:25
  • 1
    We’re interested in JavaScript-style const where the variable may only be assigned during its initialization—not csharp-style const where only compile-time expressions may be used. E.g., you can’t do const object c = new object(); but a readonly local would allow you to do this. – binki Dec 22 '17 at 19:10

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