3

So basically I'm trying to add a character in the middle of a string. Normally in something like Python, this would be pretty straightforward, but I'm really not sure how to achieve this in C++. What I'm trying to achieve is something like this:

void converter(){
    converted = ":regional_indicator_" + character + ":";

}

So basically, I'm trying to add the variable character of a type char in a string. Should I be storing character as a string instead?

For reference here's all of my code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

string inputLine;
char character;
string converted;

void input(){
    cout << "Please input the text in which you would like to be converted" << endl;
    cin >> inputLine;
}


void converter(){
    converted = ":regional_indicator_" + character + ":";

}
int main(){
    input();
    for (int i = 0; i < inputLine.length(); i++ ){
        character = tolower(inputLine[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}
2

You can do it like this:

converted = ":regional_indicator_" + std::string(1, character) + ":";

This works because adding a string literal (const char *) to a string yields a string. But adding const char * and char results in pointer arithmetic. So, by constructing a std::string from "character" you end up with const char * + std::string yielding a string and then std::string + const char * again yields a string as the final result.

| improve this answer | |
  • You should probably explain why this particular variant works. – Borgleader Jun 5 '17 at 13:15
  • pretty sure ":regional_indicator_" should use a string literal, also const char* is not a std::string literal – Mgetz Jun 5 '17 at 13:15
  • I just ended up storing the character variable as a string, is there any upside to converting the character to a string rather than simply storing as a string from the start or vice-versa? – jacksons123 Jun 5 '17 at 13:19
  • Updated the answer. – Jesper Juhl Jun 5 '17 at 13:20
  • @jacksons123 Not much, but it might be slightly slower an incur an additional heap memory allocation if the compiler does not realize that the string is a global that is never modified. – Bernard Jun 5 '17 at 13:24
3

Append s behind the strings literals to treat them as std::strings instead of const char*s:

converted = ":regional_indicator_"s + character + ":"s;

You would need to do either using namespace std::literals or using namespace std::string_literals for it to work.

On a side note, in C++, it is strange to have a function converter() to modify a global variable using another global variable. You might want to consider passing character as a parameter to the function instead.

| improve this answer | |
1

You can avoid invoking the std::string() constructor and memory allocation by using following. I have tested this before posting and it works:

void converter(){
    converted = ":regional_indicator_";
    converted.push_back(character);
    converted.push_back(':');
}

It's better because "converted" already will have some extra memory reserved, so you will just be filling that extra memory with two more characters and won't be allocating new memory.

| improve this answer | |
0

The wasy way to build strings is to use a std::ostringstream like this:

void converter(){

    std::ostringstream oss;
    oss << ":regional_indicator_" << character << ":";

    converted = oss.str(); // copy the string out

    // ... etc ...
}

The added advantage of that method is it converts numbers to string automatically too.

That's not the fastest way so if speed was important I would take advantage of the static nature of this concatenation like this:

std::string converter(){

    static char* template = ":regional_indicator_X:";
    template[20] = character; // replace the `X` with your character
    converted.assign(template, 21); // assign your string all at once

    // ... etc ...
}

That works because your string is of fixed length. If thread safety is required you can use thread_local static char* template....

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.