4

So I currently have python printing how long it took for a function to run after its done running with something like:

import time
t = time.time()
# do something in here
print "\n Time Taken: %.3f sec" % (time.time()-t)

but I want to show the live time that has passed since the function has started, and I cant quite figure out a way to get that to happen.

for example in a terminal I want it to say something like:

Working on xFunction. Time Elapsed 72.485 sec... (live updated time)
xFunction Has finished.
Time Taken: 1152.546 sec

Any help would be appreciated.

6
  • You can start a new thread for it with os.fork().
    – cs95
    Jun 5, 2017 at 19:48
  • 2
    Note that OP seems to want a live display of elapsed time (as title already suggests, but question text doesn't).
    – handle
    Jun 5, 2017 at 19:50
  • 1
    Or threading.
    – handle
    Jun 5, 2017 at 19:52
  • Why don't you put that printout in between whatever statements that function has? Jun 5, 2017 at 19:52
  • Please show a function and how you plan to call it. Jun 5, 2017 at 19:53

2 Answers 2

6

Here's an example with a thread that will print how much time has elapsed since it started and can be stopped from the main loop.

import time
import threading

class ElapsedTimeThread(threading.Thread):
    """"Stoppable thread that prints the time elapsed"""
    def __init__(self):
        super(ElapsedTimeThread, self).__init__()
        self._stop_event = threading.Event()

    def stop(self):
        self._stop_event.set()

    def stopped(self):
        return self._stop_event.is_set()

    def run(self):
        thread_start = time.time()
        while not self.stopped():
            print("\rElapsed Time {:.3f} seconds".format(time.time()-thread_start), end="")
            #include a delay here so the thread doesn't uselessly thrash the CPU
            time.sleep(0.01)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    start = time.time()
    thread = ElapsedTimeThread()
    thread.start()
    # do something
    time.sleep(5)
    # something is finished so stop the thread
    thread.stop()
    thread.join()
    print() # empty print() to output a newline
    print("Finished in {:.3f} seconds".format(time.time()-start))

This gives the following output, with the Elapsed Time counting up from zero and being overwritten:

J:\>python thr_time.py
Elapsed Time 5.000 seconds
Finished in 5.001 seconds

Note that this code is in Python 3. More info on stopping threads here & here.

Let me know if you'd like clarification on any portions.

0

I've modified @import_random 's code to enable the ability to probe elapsed time at any time during the execution of code, by wrapping 2 functions for initialization and finalization of ETC:

import time
import threading

class ElapsedTimeThread(threading.Thread):
    """"Stoppable thread that prints the time elapsed"""

    
    def __init__(self):
        super(ElapsedTimeThread, self).__init__()
        self._stop_event = threading.Event()
        self.thread_start = time.time()

    def stop(self):
        self._stop_event.set()

    def stopped(self):
        return self._stop_event.is_set()

    def getStart(self):
        return self.thread_start
    
    def getCurrentTime(self):
        print("\rElapsed Time {:.3f} s. ".format(time.time()-self.thread_start), end="", flush=True )
        
    def run(self):
        self.thread_start = time.time()
        while not self.stopped():
            print("\rElapsed Time {:.3f} s. ".format(time.time()-self.thread_start), end="", flush=True)
            #include a delay here so the thread doesn't uselessly thrash the CPU
            time.sleep(0.01)

def startTimeCounter():    
    threadTimer = ElapsedTimeThread()
    threadTimer.start()
    return threadTimer

def stopTimeCounter(threadTimeCounter):
    print() # empty print() to output a newline
    print("Finished in {:.3f} s. ".format(time.time()-threadTimeCounter.getStart()))
    threadTimeCounter.stop()
    threadTimeCounter.join()

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.