7

Is it possible to convert array to tuple in C#? Something like this:

var ar = new int[2] {5, 7};
Tuple<int,int> t = Tuple.Create(ar);
3
  • 2
    If you know the size of you array you can just pass the values of ar[0], ar[1]
    – michip96
    Jun 6 '17 at 9:37
  • 5
    This only makes sense if you know the size of the array in advance. Then using C#7 you can do this: (int a, int b) = (ar[0], ar[1]); (which has the advantage that you can name the tuple elements). Jun 6 '17 at 9:38
  • The main problem here is that the size of the array (and the size of the Tuple<>) must be known at compile time: in the code you wrote, you explicitly wrote Tuple<int, int>. You can easily create a method that, given an array of two (or more) elements, returns a Tuple<T, T>.
    – xanatos
    Jun 6 '17 at 10:05
6

No, System.Tuple has a maximum size for good reason. It's simply the wrong tool for the job you appear to be doing. Why don't you just return the array instead of a tuple? Your approach could end up needing a tuple with dozens of elements which is beyond ridiculous and not at all maintainable.

Even better instead of returning the array, return an interface such as ICollection<T> or IEnumerable<T>.

2
  • not at all maintainable - just what I wanted to say Jun 6 '17 at 14:18
  • 3
    I think the questioner may have been thinking of cases where the array size is known at compile time. For example an older API predating tuples that returns an array of four strings. Or if you have done a regular expression match with a known number of capturing fields, and now want to package up the result as a tuple.
    – Ed Avis
    Dec 17 '18 at 14:36
2

Now with C# 7.0, you can create extension methods to deconstruct arrays to ValueTuple, which makes

var (p1,p2,p3) = s.Split(':');

possible.

public static class ArrayExt {
    public static void Deconstruct<T>(this T[] srcArray, out T a0) {
        if (srcArray == null || srcArray.Length < 1)
            throw new ArgumentException(nameof(srcArray));

        a0 = srcArray[0];
    }

    public static void Deconstruct<T>(this T[] srcArray, out T a0, out T a1) {
        if (srcArray == null || srcArray.Length < 2)
            throw new ArgumentException(nameof(srcArray));

        a0 = srcArray[0];
        a1 = srcArray[1];
    }

    public static void Deconstruct<T>(this T[] srcArray, out T a0, out T a1, out T a2) {
        if (srcArray == null || srcArray.Length < 3)
            throw new ArgumentException(nameof(srcArray));

        a0 = srcArray[0];
        a1 = srcArray[1];
        a2 = srcArray[2];
    }

    public static void Deconstruct<T>(this T[] srcArray, out T a0, out T a1, out T a2, out T a3) {
        if (srcArray == null || srcArray.Length < 4)
            throw new ArgumentException(nameof(srcArray));

        a0 = srcArray[0];
        a1 = srcArray[1];
        a2 = srcArray[2];
        a3 = srcArray[3];
    }

    public static void Deconstruct<T>(this T[] srcArray, out T a0, out T a1, out T a2, out T a3, out T a4) {
        if (srcArray == null || srcArray.Length < 5)
            throw new ArgumentException(nameof(srcArray));

        a0 = srcArray[0];
        a1 = srcArray[1];
        a2 = srcArray[2];
        a3 = srcArray[3];
        a4 = srcArray[4];
    }

    public static void Deconstruct<T>(this T[] srcArray, out T a0, out T a1, out T a2, out T a3, out T a4, out T a5) {
        if (srcArray == null || srcArray.Length < 6)
            throw new ArgumentException(nameof(srcArray));

        a0 = srcArray[0];
        a1 = srcArray[1];
        a2 = srcArray[2];
        a3 = srcArray[3];
        a4 = srcArray[4];
        a5 = srcArray[5];
    }

    public static void Deconstruct<T>(this T[] srcArray, out T a0, out T a1, out T a2, out T a3, out T a4, out T a5, out T a6) {
        if (srcArray == null || srcArray.Length < 7)
            throw new ArgumentException(nameof(srcArray));

        a0 = srcArray[0];
        a1 = srcArray[1];
        a2 = srcArray[2];
        a3 = srcArray[3];
        a4 = srcArray[4];
        a5 = srcArray[5];
        a6 = srcArray[6];
    }

    public static void Deconstruct<T>(this T[] srcArray, out T a0, out T a1, out T a2, out T a3, out T a4, out T a5, out T a6, out T a7) {
        if (srcArray == null || srcArray.Length < 8)
            throw new ArgumentException(nameof(srcArray));

        a0 = srcArray[0];
        a1 = srcArray[1];
        a2 = srcArray[2];
        a3 = srcArray[3];
        a4 = srcArray[4];
        a5 = srcArray[5];
        a6 = srcArray[6];
        a7 = srcArray[7];
    }
}
1

By doing this you can get an list of tuples but I don't see the reason to do this:

      var ar = new int[2] { 5, 7 };

        List<Tuple<int>> result = ar
            .Select(x => Tuple.Create(x))
            .ToList();

Or if you want to have it in one tuple instead:

   var ar = new int[2] { 5, 7 };
    Tuple<int[]> result = Tuple.Create(ar);

If you know the size do this:

  Tuple<int, int> tuple = Tuple.Create(ar[0], ar[1]);
-1

Well why dont we do it like this

public static Tuple<T, T> CreateTuple<T>(T[] array, int totalItem = 2)
{
    if (arr.length % totalItem != 0)
    throw new Exception("Error the length dose not consist with totalItem");

    return Tuple.Create(arr);
}

Here we validate that each item have one and two.

2
  • There can be very good situations where you would like to do this, like when the array size is known. So saying in general this is a bad idea is a bit harsh. Feb 1 '20 at 16:50
  • This could produces a compiler error: Error CS0029: Cannot implicitly convert type 'System.Tuple<T[]>' to 'System.Tuple<T, T>'
    – Joerg
    Jan 22 at 9:26
-1

you can use sub tuples like, for example this

var tupArray = new Tuple<dynamic,dynamic,dynamic,dynamic,dynamic,dynamic,dynamic,Tuple<dynamic,dynamic>>
(
    a[0],a[1],a[2],a[3],a[4],a[5],a[6],new Tuple<dynamic,dynamic>(a[7],a[8])
)
-3

your idea is a bad idea... array and tuples don't "mix" in C#/.NET. There are languages where the distance between arrays and classes is small (like Javascript, where with the [...] operator you can use both arrays and objects). C# isn't one of those languages. Tuples don't define a this[int n] indexer for exactly this reason.

But you asked for code, and so I'll give you code.

The main problem here is that the size of the array (and the size of the Tuple<>) must be known at compile time: in the code you wrote, you explicitly wrote Tuple<int, int>. You can easily create a method that, given an array of two (or more) elements, returns a Tuple<T, T>, like:

public static Tuple<T, T> CreateTuple2<T>(T[] array)
{
    if (array == null || array.Length < 2)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException(nameof(array));
    }

    return Tuple.Create(array[0], array[1]);
}

From this you can create other CreateTuple3(), CreateTuple4()...

6
  • 1
    This is terrible advice.
    – user9993
    Jun 6 '17 at 10:20
  • @user9993 I consider it to be an "anwer", not an "advice". The "question" is bad (mixing arrays and tuples is a bad idea in C#/.NET), but he asked for a piece of code (Is it possible to convert array to tuple in C#? Something like this:), so I gave it to him.
    – xanatos
    Jun 6 '17 at 10:22
  • 1
    Purely theoretically, size of Tuple<> doesn't need to be known: you can make a single method that builds the Tuple<,,,,,,> dynamically via reflection sizing it according to the array's size (assuming it doesn't exceed the tuple's max N params) and returns it as object or dynamic and laugh evilishly at future woes of its users (oh, you got object? so just cast it muahahaha). Or create a single TTuple CreateTuple<TTuple>(object[] vals) that works in a similar way, and laugh evilishly in a similar way (just invoke it CreateTuple<Tuple<int,string,int,... >..).. or, (...) Jun 6 '17 at 14:24
  • 6
    And yet I would like to do var (p1,p2,p3) = str.Split(':');
    – NetMage
    Jul 12 '17 at 23:39
  • 1
    And now I want to implement Perl's unpack in C# and be able to use it with Tuple assignment just like Perl does: var (s1,s2) = unpack("A4x2A4", test);
    – NetMage
    Oct 19 '17 at 19:57

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