1

I've got simple c++ code that firstly creates 4 threads and then sends 1000 times number 1 to the c++ queue followed by four 0. Each of these threads tries to read from that queue and when any thread reads 0, it terminates and prints its local sum. If it reads 1 then it simply adds 1 to the sum. The reading is protected with mutex. Code works as intended in 4 out of 5 times, but sometimes I get double free or corruption (!prev) error... ...Abort core dumped. I've also debugged the code with gdb but only got received signal SIGABRT, Aborted ... ...at raise.c: No such file or directory". I'm not explicitly allocating or deallocating any memory. What could be causing the problem?

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <queue>

std::queue<int> my_queue;
pthread_mutex_t mutex = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;

void *process(void *arg){
    int sum = 0;
    while(1){
        if(!my_queue.empty()){
            pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
            if (my_queue.front() == 1){
                sum += 1;
                my_queue.pop();
                pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
            }
            else{
                my_queue.pop();
                printf("Sum: %d\n", sum);
                pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    return arg;
}

int main(void){
    pthread_t id[4];
    for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++){
        if (pthread_create(&id[i], NULL, process, NULL) != 0){
            fprintf(stderr, "%s\n", "Error creating thread!");
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++){
        my_queue.push(1);
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++){
        my_queue.push(0);
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++){
        pthread_join(id[i], NULL);
    }
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
  • 2
    'if(!my_queue.empty()){' - not inside lock, TOCTTOU error. – ThingyWotsit Jun 6 '17 at 10:33
  • 2
    Well you do a lot of pushing into my_queue without protection. – Some programmer dude Jun 6 '17 at 10:33
  • It's usual to use at least one semaphore to count the entries in the queue and so prevent looping on an empty queue. – ThingyWotsit Jun 6 '17 at 10:35
  • 2
    std::queue<int> this can't compile in C. C++ and C are different languages. – Stargateur Jun 6 '17 at 10:38
  • ...and what @Someprogrammerdude says - I didn't get as far as spotting the queue pushes outside the mutex:( – ThingyWotsit Jun 6 '17 at 10:38
0

You have two problems:

Firstly you are pushing onto the queue without holding the lock, secondly you are testing if the queue is empty without holding the lock.

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <queue>

std::queue<int> my_queue;
pthread_mutex_t mutex = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;

void *process(void *arg){
    int sum = 0;
    bool keep_going = true;
    while(keep_going){
        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
        if(!my_queue.empty()){
            if (my_queue.front() == 1){
                sum += 1;
            }
            else{
                keep_going=false;
            }
        }
        my_queue.pop();
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
    }
    printf("Sum: %d\n", sum); // Don't do IO while holding a lock!
    return arg;
}

int main(void){
    pthread_t id[4];
    // Initialize queue *before* creating threads.
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++){
        my_queue.push(1);
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++){
        my_queue.push(0);
    }
    // Create threads
    for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++){
        if (pthread_create(&id[i], NULL, process, NULL) != 0){
            fprintf(stderr, "%s\n", "Error creating thread!");
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
    }
    // Join them.
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++){
        pthread_join(id[i], NULL);
    }
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

If you want to add to the queue after creating the threads, you need something like:

    pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
    my_queue.push(value);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);

Inside the for-loops. Also, there is then a real chance of the queue emptying before you get to the zeros. Either do it properly by waiting on semaphores, or the queue loop needs to becomes something like:

        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
        if(my_queue.empty()){
            pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
            usleep(1);
            pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
        } else {

Where the thread will briefly sleep to let the queue fill up.

Also, you are writing in C++. Learn to write a RAII class to call pthread_mutex_lock and unlock.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Thanks! I got the idea. However, let's say I would like to firstly create the threads and then initialize the queue like in my example. How could I then protect adding elements to the queue with mutex? – Chilcone Jun 6 '17 at 10:58

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