I'm trying to figure out how to deal with complex domain model using CQRS/ES approach. Let's imagine we have e.g. Order domain entity, which handles both state and behavior of order. It has a Status property with transition rules for switching between statuses (implementing State pattern or any other kind of state machine). According to DDD principles, this logic should be implemented in Order class (representing the Order model) itself, having methods like approve(), cancel(), ship(), etc.

Looking at different public examples of this kind architecture, it turns out that domain entity and aggregate root is the same, and it handles both the state and behavior and even its own projection from events. Isn't it a violation of SRP?

But my question is more concrete: if I want to process new command (and apply new event), should I reconstitute entity from event stream (i.e. from write model and write db) and call its behavioral methods (which applies events to state) to handle business rules? Or just handle commands and events themselves, without having any write-model entity?

Pseudocode to illustrate:

class ApproveOrderHandler
{
    private EventStore eventStore

    // ...

    public void handle(ApproveOrder event)
    {
        Order order = this.eventStore.findById(event.getOrderId()); // getting order projection from event store
        order.approve(); // handling business logic
        this.eventStore.save(order.releaseEvents()); // save new events (OrderApproved)
    }
}

class Order extends AbstractAggregate
{
    private Uuid id;

    private DateTime takenAt;

    private OrderStatus status;

    // ...

    public void approve()
    {
        this.status.approve(); // business rules blah blah
        this.Apply(new OrderApproved(this.id)); // applying event
    }

    // ...
}

Isn't that overdoing or somewhat?

And what should I do with relationships between entities in event-sourcing? If they exist only in "read model", there is no point in domain entity class.

EDIT: or maybe I should store state snapshot in "read database" and recover entity for operations from it? But it breaks idea of "different models for read & write"...

EDIT2: fixed read/write models mistake

  • "if I want to process new command (and apply new event), should I reconstitute entity from event stream (i.e. from read model and read db) and call its behavioral methods (which applies events to state) to handle business rules? Or just handle commands and events themselves, without having any write-model entity?" - I don't understand, what do you mean? Can you give me a concrete example? – Constantin Galbenu Jun 7 '17 at 1:48
  • There is a pseudocode example which shows what I mean – zugo Jun 7 '17 at 9:26
  • >> And what should I do with relationships between entities in event-sourcing? If they exist only in "read model", there is no point in domain entity class. Genre classic, you can read this article: danielwhittaker.me/2014/11/22/… – Vladislav Ihost Jun 23 '17 at 14:32
up vote 5 down vote accepted

TL;DR

But my question is more concrete: if I want to process new command (and apply new event), should I reconstitute entity from event stream (i.e. from write model and write db) and call its behavioral methods (which applies events to state) to handle business rules?

Yes.

Or just handle commands and events themselves, without having any write-model entity?

No.

Once more, with feeling

The command handler lives in the application component; the business model lives in the domain component.

The motivation for keeping these components separated: making model replacement cost effective. What the domain experts care about, where the business gets its win, is the domain model. We don't expect to write the business model once and get it correct for all of time -- much more likely that we will learn more about how we want the model to work, and therefore be delivering improvements to the model on a regular basis. Therefore, its important that there not be a lot of drag to replace one version of the model with another -- we want the replacement to be easy; we want the amount of work required to make the change to be reflected in the business value we get.

So we want the good stuff separated from "the plumbing".

Keeping all of the business logic in the domain component gives you two easy wins; first, you don't ever have to guess about where the business logic lives -- whether the specifics of the use case are easy or hard, the business logic is going to be in the Order, not anywhere else. Second, because the business logic is not in the command handler, you don't have to worry about creating a bunch of test doubles to satisfy those dependency requirements -- you can test against the domain model directly.

So, we use handlers to reconstitute entities and calling their business logic methods, NOT to handling business logic itself?

Almost -- we use repositories to reconstitute entities and aggregates to handle the business logic. The role of the command handler is orchestration; it's the glue between the data model and the domain model.

  • What about the violation of SRP? :) – Constantin Galbenu Jun 7 '17 at 6:23
  • Thanks for an answer. When i wrote "(i.e. from read model and read db)" I meant "write model and write db" ofc, just my lapse. So, we use handlers to reconstitute entities and calling their business logic methods, NOT to handling business logic itself? That was really important notion. – zugo Jun 7 '17 at 8:32

Looking at different public examples of this kind architecture, it turns out that domain entity and aggregate root is the same, and it handles both the state and behavior and even its own projection from events. Isn't it a violation of SRP?

No, it does not. "Responsibility" is a vague term but in this case means "reason to change" and an aggregate root has only one (kind of) reason to change: business requirements change. One example of reason to change that do not affect the Aggregate roots is the infrastructure changes, i.e. you change to event store implementation from MySql to MongoDB.

But my question is more concrete: if I want to process new command (and apply new event), should I reconstitute entity from event stream (i.e. from write model and write db) and call its behavioral methods (which applies events to state) to handle business rules?

Every time a command reaches an Aggregate, that Aggregate instance is reconstructed from its stream of events (that are loaded from the Event store - the write side persistence), by applying one by one, in the order that they were generated; there could be optimizations as snapshoting but they should be avoided until proven necessary.

Or just handle commands and events themselves, without having any write-model entity?

You need to have a write model entity, a.k.a. Aggregate; that model enforces the business rules by refusing commands that are incompatible with previously generated events.

Your pseudocode should look like this:

class ApproveOrderHandler
{
    private EventStore eventStore

    // ...

    public void handle(ApproveOrder event)
    {
        Order order = this.eventStore.findById(event.getOrderId()); // getting order projection from event store
        order.approve(); // handling business logic
        this.eventStore.save(order.releaseEvents()); // save new events (OrderApproved)
    }
}

class Order extends AbstractAggregate
{
    private Uuid id;

    private DateTime takenAt;

    private OrderStatus status;

    // ...

    public void approve()
    {
        if(!this.canBeApproved){ //here is a business rule enforced!
            throw new Exception('Order cannot be approved');
        }

        if(this.status.isAlreadyApproved()){
             return; //idempotent operation
        }

        // this line of code was moved to its own Apply method

        this.generateAndApplyEvent(new OrderApproved(this.id)); // applying event
    }

    //this method is called in two situations: when the aggregate is reconstructed from the eventstream and when the event is raised for the first time
    public void Apply(OrderApproved event)
    {
        this.status.approve(); // transition change
    }

    // ...
}

Isn't that overdoing or somewhat?

No, it's not. Note that I moved the line of code that was changing the order status

And what should I do with relationships between entities in event-sourcing? If they exist only in "read model", there is no point in domain entity class.

Relationships between entities (between aggregate roots) exist in the write model too but the references are only by ID.

EDIT: or maybe I should store state snapshot in "read database" and recover entity for operations from it? But it breaks idea of "different models for read & write"...

Aggregate snapshots, when activated/used, are in general stored along the event stream, in the events commit (an events commit is composed of all events that were generated by a single command execution). From what I've seen in productions, snapshots are stored every n-th commit (for example every 5 commits). So they are stored on the write side. This is because a snapshot have a meaning only in the context of a specific Aggregate version.

  • Thanks. About "enforcing business rules" about changing status in that case I meant that they are placed in OrderStatus model, not Order. But that doesn't affect essence of question anyways, this is just an example. Doesn't having only ids in aggregate root (i.e. user_id in Order instead of reference on a User object) violate DDD idea? – zugo Jun 7 '17 at 11:53
  • And how should I get i.e. Order events by given User Id, if events are stored serialized and denormalized? – zugo Jun 7 '17 at 13:15
  • "Doesn't having only ids in aggregate root (i.e. user_id in Order instead of reference on a User object) violate DDD idea?" - No. DDD permits references by ID; you wouldn't be able to do anything if this had been forbidden also. – Constantin Galbenu Jun 7 '17 at 13:27
  • "nd how should I get i.e. Order events by given User Id" - You won't need to do this. You just build a ReadModel (i.e. ListOfAllOrdersByUser) and populate it as the OrderCreated events are arriving – Constantin Galbenu Jun 7 '17 at 13:29
  • Thanks. So complicated approach. DDD is anything but KISS. – zugo Jun 7 '17 at 13:58

Put your business logic on Entities or Value Objet .If they don't fit there strive for Domain Services .

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