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I can understand how B*Tree index works by searching through a Tree.

But, I can't understand how sparse index or dense index works.

For example, if dense index need to have each value mapped by a key. How it's going to benefit when you do the search?

Adding more clarification:
This spare/dense index refer to the index described here on wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Database_index#Sparse_index

For my understanding the point of index works is that you can search through the B*Tree as O(logN) instead of searching each block as O(N)

But, from the description of either sparse index or dense index. I can't see how it benefit for searching, you search through keys? But, keys are having the same amount as values right? (for dense index it's strictly equal)

What I am guessing is that dense index and sparse index is just the index used in B*Tree. But, I am not sure if I understand it correctly. Since, I can't find anything online to confirm my thought.

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  • I expect this question was either mistagged MongoDB or you are conflating "sparse/dense indexing" concepts from a different database. Assuming you are referring to sparse indexes in MongoDB (as opposed to a normal index), the index mechanics work the same but only documents that have the indexed field are included.
    – Stennie
    Commented Jun 8, 2017 at 10:40
  • There's a note in MongoDB's sparse index documentation that may help: "Do not confuse sparse indexes in MongoDB with block-level indexes in other databases. Think of them as dense indexes with a specific filter."
    – Stennie
    Commented Jun 8, 2017 at 10:40
  • Hi, Thanks for point that out. I was actually confused the sparse index in MongoDB with the block-level indexes in other database. Now, I figure out the difference. But, still. I don't understand how the sparse/dense index works in block-level indexes in other database. Commented Jun 9, 2017 at 18:14
  • @Stennie Although I figured out the difference. But, still I can't figure out how the spares index works in MongoDB. For example, you have N values with field x not empty. then your will have N keys. Then how does the key help your in search? Does the key has to be a hash(value)? Otherwise, you need to search through keys and I think that would be the same to search through values. Right? Commented Jun 9, 2017 at 18:29

1 Answer 1

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Block-level sparse index

A block-level sparse index will only be helpful for queries where the index is also clustered (i.e. sort order of the index represents the locality of data on disk). A block-level sparse index will have fewer values but still be useful to find the approximate location before starting a sequential scan. The sparseness in this case is effectively "index every nth value in a clustered index".

From a search point of view, a block-level sparse index query would:

  • find the largest key less than or equal to your indexed search criteria (normal B-tree Big O time complexity which is O(log N) for search)
  • use that key as the starting point for a sequential scan of the clustered index (O(N) for search)

The advantage of a sparse block-level index is mainly around size rather than speed: a smaller sparse index may fit into memory when a dense index (including all values) would not. Range-based queries on a clustered index are already going to return sequential results, so a sparse index may have some advantages as long as the index isn't too sparse to efficiently support common queries.

A clustered index including records with duplicate keys is effectively one example of a sparse index: there is no need to index the offset of each individual record with the same value because the logical order of the clustered index matches the physical order of the data.

For a worked example, see: Dense and Sparse Indices (sfu.ca).

MongoDB index with sparse option

still I can't figure out how the sparse index works in MongoDB. For example, you have N values with field x not empty. then your will have N keys. Then how does the key help your in search?

A MongoDB index with the sparse option only contains entries for documents that have the indexed field. MongoDB has flexible schema so fields are not required to be present (or the same type) for all documents in a collection. Note: optional document validation is a feature of MongoDB 3.2+.

By default all documents in a collection will be included in an index, but those that do not have the indexed field present will store a null value. If all of your documents in a MongoDB collection have a value for the indexed field, there is no difference between a default index and one with the sparse option.

This is really a special case of a partial index: the sparseness refers to limiting the scope of the indexed values to only include non-null entries. The indexing approach is otherwise identical to a non-sparse index.

The MongoDB documentation calls this out with a note:

Do not confuse sparse indexes in MongoDB with block-level indexes in other databases. Think of them as dense indexes with a specific filter.

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  • Thanks for the explanation. A block-level sparse index will only be helpful for queries where the index is also clustered. This is where cleared my confusion. Commented Jun 14, 2017 at 1:22
  • Does the MongoDB index also need to be clustered for it to benefit the search? Therefore you can only have on index? Commented Jun 14, 2017 at 1:23
  • @user1947415 MongoDB (at at 3.4) doesn't have clustered indexes or the more general "block-level sparse index" you asked about. As per the documentation note, think of a MongoDB index with the sparse option as a dense index with a specific filter. You can have multiple sparse/partial indexes in MongoDB for the same collection; the distinction is that these secondary indexes will only contain entries for documents matching the indexed field (index with sparse option) or filter expression (partial index in MongoDB 3.2+).
    – Stennie
    Commented Jun 14, 2017 at 3:52
  • if you have multiple indexes in each collection, then when you sharding your can keep data arranged to only one indexes. (Like same idea as clustered index). How is that handled in MongoDB? Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 19:31
  • @user1947415 A clustered index controls how data is physically stored on disk. Sharding is a higher-level concept for partitioning data in a distributed system (and unrelated to your original question on dense vs sparse index searches). If you have additional questions about MongoDB concepts I'd suggest posting on DBA StackExchange.
    – Stennie
    Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 21:22

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