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I am trying to count indices to find the region of interest in a large amount of data. This way, I can use slice notation at the appropriate indices for fast performance. I originally tried using the .count() method but I am now trying to use a dictionary module. As an example, I created a txt file and obtained the number of occurrences of values. How can I use this to count indices in the range of interest?

Simple example:

The txt file contains the following data.

1     100       1       
1     101       2
1     102       3
2     103       4
2     104       5
3     105       6
3     106       7
3     107       8
3     108       9
4     109       10
5     110       11

I use the two functions below to read the file and organize the data into the appropriate lists.

def get_list_from_int(lines, col_number):
    list = []
    for col in lines:
        datum = col.split()
        list.append(float(datum[col_number]))
    return list

def read_data(filename): # filename = "User/Desktop/fileloc/filename.txt"
    lines = list(open(filename, 'r'))
    xs = get_list_from_int(lines, 0) # column 1
    ys = get_list_from_int(lines, 1) # column 2
    zs = get_list_from_int(lines, 2) # column 3
    return xs, ys, zs

I then use Counter via the collections module.

X = Counter(xs)
print(X)
>> Counter({3.0: 4, 1.0: 3, 2.0: 2, 4.0: 1, 5.0: 1})

Problem: Suppose I would like the indices for which 3 ≤ xs ≤ 4. I can apply slice notation to obtain the same indices of the corresponding ys and zs. How can I obtain the sum of values of the keys greater than or equal to 3 but less than or equal to 4? Ideally, the obtained result would be [6, 10], but [6, 7, 8, 9, 10] would work too.

Original approach (worth abandoning?): My original approach was to use define a function that counts the indices from the first element of a list until the first element of the range of interest, and then to continue counting until the last element in the range of interest; the function would take the the boundary elements of the range of interest as inputs using start += data_list.count(index) for index in range(1, boundary_1) and end += data_list.count(index) for index in range(boundary_1, boundary_2+1), but I could not get the function to work correctly.

  • There is a little confusion in the Problem statement. Are you asking whether the obtained result would be [6, 7, 8, 9, 10] or [6, 10]? – voidpro Jun 7 '17 at 7:20
  • [6,10] is preferred but either will do. You are right though, it's not [5, 9]. I found a way to do this, though I'm interested in alt approaches. Will edit when by computer (not mobile) in 2 hrs. – MPath Jun 7 '17 at 8:19
  • I put up an example answer. I'm still curious about other approaches though. – MPath Jun 7 '17 at 11:41
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def choose_slice(start, end, xs):
    # subfunction called by get_slice() -- defined below
    go, stop = 0, 0
    cx = sorted(Counter(xs).items()) # sort to count consecutively
    for val, key in cx:
        if val < start:
            go += key # match index at boundary of region of interest
            # print("count = %d" %key, "value = %.2f" %val)
        elif val >= start and val <= end:
            stop += key # inbetweeen the boundaries, in the region of interest
            # print("count = %d" %key, "value = %.2f" %val)
        elif val > end: # match index at boundary of region of interest
            break
    stop = go + stop
    return go, stop

def get_slice(start, end, xs=xs, ys=ys, zs=zs):
    go, stop = choose_slice(start, end, xs) # get indices
    return xs[go:stop], ys[go:stop], zs[go:stop] # get values at indices

xx, yy, zz = get_slice(3, 4)
print(xx)
>> [3.0, 3.0, 3.0, 3.0, 4.0] 

This works for my dataset of size ~10^4. But I'm still curious about other approaches to this.

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