43

I know you can do

print str(myList)

to get

[1, 2, 3]

and you can do

i = 0
for entry in myList:
  print str(i) + ":", entry
  i += 1

to get

0: 1  
1: 2  
2: 3    

But is there a way similar to the first to get a result similar to the last?

With my limited knowledge of Python (and some help from the documentation), my best is:

print '\n'.join([str(n) + ": " + str(entry) for (n, entry) in zip(range(0,len(myList)), myList)])

It's not much less verbose, but at least I get a custom string in one (compound) statement. Can you do better?

99
>>> lst = [1, 2, 3]
>>> print('\n'.join('{}: {}'.format(*k) for k in enumerate(lst)))
0: 1
1: 2
2: 3

Note: you just need to understand that list comprehension or iterating over a generator expression is explicit looping.

  • 5
    More explicitly: Losing the square brackets makes it a generator expression, so it doesn't create the whole list in memory before building a string from it. And enumerate is a built in function to do the same as the poster's zip/range/len combo. – Thomas K Dec 14 '10 at 15:11
  • "Note: you just need to understand that list comprehension or iterating over a generator expression is explicit looping." I think your concept of "explicit" is radically different from mine. List comprehensions are declarative and/or functional rather than imperative. – Karl Knechtel Dec 14 '10 at 15:28
  • @SilentGhost: thanks, I am on a system with python2.6. I ended up using "print '\n'.join('entry {0}: {1}'.format(i+1, entry) for i, entry in enumerate(entries))" (I actually needed an offset of 1) – stefaanv Dec 14 '10 at 15:40
  • 1
    @stefaan: enumerate has a start parameter, so you could just do: print('\n'.join('entry {0}: {1}'.format(*k) for k in enumerate(entries, 1))) and it's a good idea to start using print function over print statement. – SilentGhost Dec 14 '10 at 15:54
  • @Karl: I don't think that declarativeness is contradictory to explicitness. – SilentGhost Dec 14 '10 at 15:57
11

In python 3s print function:

lst = [1, 2, 3]
print('My list:', *lst, sep='\n- ')

Output:

My list:
- 1
- 2
- 3

Con: The sep must be a string, so you can't modify it based on which element you're printing. And you need a kind of header to do this (above it was 'My list:').

Pro: You don't have to join() a list into a string object, which might be advantageous for larger lists. And the whole thing is quite concise and readable.

9
l = [1, 2, 3]
print '\n'.join(['%i: %s' % (n, l[n]) for n in xrange(len(l))])
  • 8
    I'm shocked how many people seemingly don't know enumerate. – user395760 Dec 14 '10 at 15:11
  • @delnan: I don't know it either, probably because I don't use python enough (tests and scripting). I'll look into it now. – stefaanv Dec 14 '10 at 15:15
  • Yes indeed, useful knowledge :) I upvoted the other one ;) – Lucas Moeskops Dec 14 '10 at 15:16
5

Starting from this:

>>> lst = [1, 2, 3]
>>> print('\n'.join('{}: {}'.format(*k) for k in enumerate(lst)))
0: 1
1: 2
2: 3

You can get rid of the join by passing \n as a separator to print

>>> print(*('{}: {}'.format(*k) for k in enumerate(lst)), sep="\n")
0: 1
1: 2
2: 3

Now you see you could use map, but you'll need to change the format string (yuck!)

>>> print(*(map('{0[0]}: {0[1]}'.format, enumerate(lst))), sep="\n")
0: 1
1: 2
2: 3

or pass 2 sequences to map. A separate counter and no longer enumerate lst

>>> from itertools import count
>>> print(*(map('{}: {}'.format, count(), lst)), sep="\n")
0: 1
1: 2
2: 3
  • only fist syntax is for py 2.x all other for py 3x – Bomba Ps Mar 29 at 8:31
  • @BombaPs, The others can work for 2.x if you use from __future__ import print_function – John La Rooy Mar 31 at 23:12
4
>>> from itertools import starmap

>>> lst = [1, 2, 3]
>>> print('\n'.join(starmap('{}: {}'.format, enumerate(lst))))
0: 1
1: 2
2: 3

This uses itertools.starmap, which is like map, except it *s the argument into the function. The function in this case is '{}: {}'.format.

I would prefer the comprehension of SilentGhost, but starmap is a nice function to know about.

3

Another:

>>> lst=[10,11,12]
>>> fmt="%i: %i"
>>> for d in enumerate(lst):
...    print(fmt%d)
... 
0: 10
1: 11
2: 12

Yet another form:

>>> for i,j in enumerate(lst): print "%i: %i"%(i,j)

That method is nice since the individual elements in tuples produced by enumerate can be modified such as:

>>> for i,j in enumerate([3,4,5],1): print "%i^%i: %i "%(i,j,i**j)
... 
1^3: 1 
2^4: 16 
3^5: 243 

Of course, don't forget you can get a slice from this like so:

>>> for i,j in list(enumerate(lst))[1:2]: print "%i: %i"%(i,j)
... 
1: 11
  • There is nothing wrong with explicit looping. I was just wondering what the alternatives were. – stefaanv Dec 15 '10 at 8:13
3
from time import clock
from random import sample

n = 500
myList = sample(xrange(10000),n)
#print myList

A,B,C,D = [],[],[],[]

for i in xrange(100):
    t0 = clock()
    ecr =( '\n'.join('{}: {}'.format(*k) for k in enumerate(myList)) )
    A.append(clock()-t0)

    t0 = clock()
    ecr = '\n'.join(str(n) + ": " + str(entry) for (n, entry) in zip(range(0,len(myList)), myList))
    B.append(clock()-t0)

    t0 = clock()
    ecr = '\n'.join(map(lambda x: '%s: %s' % x, enumerate(myList)))
    C.append(clock()-t0)

    t0 = clock()
    ecr = '\n'.join('%s: %s' % x for x in enumerate(myList))
    D.append(clock()-t0)

print '\n'.join(('t1 = '+str(min(A))+'   '+'{:.1%}.'.format(min(A)/min(D)),
                 't2 = '+str(min(B))+'   '+'{:.1%}.'.format(min(B)/min(D)),
                 't3 = '+str(min(C))+'   '+'{:.1%}.'.format(min(C)/min(D)),
                 't4 = '+str(min(D))+'   '+'{:.1%}.'.format(min(D)/min(D))))

For n=500:

150.8%.
142.7%.
110.8%.
100.0%.

For n=5000:

153.5%.
176.2%.
109.7%.
100.0%.

Oh, I see now: only the solution 3 with map() fits with the title of the question.

  • Nice research. Generator expression isn't explicit looping, so they all count with 1 and 4 being my favorites, with 1 using a more powerful, but as here show, slower formatting. Merci. – stefaanv Dec 15 '10 at 8:11
  • 1
    timeit – SilentGhost Dec 15 '10 at 16:22
0

Take a look on pprint, The pprint module provides a capability to “pretty-print” arbitrary Python data structures in a form which can be used as input to the interpreter. If the formatted structures include objects which are not fundamental Python types, the representation may not be loadable. This may be the case if objects such as files, sockets or classes are included, as well as many other objects which are not representable as Python literals.

>>> import pprint
>>> stuff = ['spam', 'eggs', 'lumberjack', 'knights', 'ni']
>>> stuff.insert(0, stuff[:])
>>> pp = pprint.PrettyPrinter(indent=4)
>>> pp.pprint(stuff)
[   ['spam', 'eggs', 'lumberjack', 'knights', 'ni'],
    'spam',
    'eggs',
    'lumberjack',
    'knights',
    'ni']
>>> pp = pprint.PrettyPrinter(width=41, compact=True)
>>> pp.pprint(stuff)
[['spam', 'eggs', 'lumberjack',
  'knights', 'ni'],
 'spam', 'eggs', 'lumberjack', 'knights',
 'ni']
>>> tup = ('spam', ('eggs', ('lumberjack', ('knights', ('ni', ('dead',
... ('parrot', ('fresh fruit',))))))))
>>> pp = pprint.PrettyPrinter(depth=6)
>>> pp.pprint(tup)
('spam', ('eggs', ('lumberjack', ('knights', ('ni', ('dead', (...)))))))

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