78

I'd like to test the validity of a regular expression in PHP, preferably before it's used. Is the only way to do this actually trying a preg_match() and seeing if it returns FALSE?

Is there a simpler/proper way to test for a valid regular expression?

5
  • 7
    Do you mean something like: stackoverflow.com/questions/172303/… ?
    – Jon
    Oct 16, 2012 at 23:10
  • If it doesn't have to be in code, you can go to regexr.com, and paste in your regex, and type in the text you're matching it up against.
    – Kao
    Oct 19, 2012 at 8:08
  • Why don't you want to check preg_match() against false?
    – rubo77
    Oct 19, 2012 at 18:31
  • 1
    Looks like i came late for the party
    – Baba
    Oct 20, 2012 at 10:56
  • Some answers do not consider that MAYBE the regex to be validated comes from the input of an admin user of an app... MAYBE the app has a "contact_types" table with a "regex" field...
    – J. Bruni
    Mar 1, 2014 at 5:25

12 Answers 12

150
+250
// This is valid, both opening ( and closing )
var_dump(preg_match('~Valid(Regular)Expression~', '') === false);
// This is invalid, no opening ( for the closing )
var_dump(preg_match('~InvalidRegular)Expression~', '') === false);

As the user pozs said, also consider putting @ in front of preg_match() (@preg_match()) in a testing environment to prevent warnings or notices.

To validate a RegExp just run it against null (no need to know the data you want to test against upfront). If it returns explicit false (=== false), it's broken. Otherwise it's valid though it need not match anything.

So there's no need to write your own RegExp validator. It's wasted time...

11
  • 1
    Just a guess: The OP said "I'd like to test the validity of a regular expression in PHP, preferably before it's used."
    – JDB
    Oct 18, 2012 at 14:17
  • 7
    @Cyborgx37 So what? I gave him the solution with a NULL. You don't need to now the string you'll use it against. You just need to know the pattern to see if it's correct. If it'll match or not... that's a different story and depends on your target string. What did I say wrong?
    – CodeAngry
    Oct 18, 2012 at 15:09
  • 5
    Note, that in the case of an invalid regexp, your code will show up a warning, which is too bad for only testing the expression - you should protect you preg_match() call with @
    – pozs
    Oct 23, 2012 at 11:31
  • 2
    The error suppression operator isn't a good solution because of issues with unit testing frameowrks and other disabling the "@" operator for testing. As workaround you can use "set_error_handler" before and "restore_error_handler" after that test ;) Oct 23, 2012 at 15:33
  • 3
    The second argument of preg_match is string not null. Passing null will fail when strict types are declared.
    – ya.teck
    Jan 15, 2021 at 8:06
27

I created a simple function that can be called to checking preg

function is_preg_error()
{
    $errors = array(
        PREG_NO_ERROR               => 'Code 0 : No errors',
        PREG_INTERNAL_ERROR         => 'Code 1 : There was an internal PCRE error',
        PREG_BACKTRACK_LIMIT_ERROR  => 'Code 2 : Backtrack limit was exhausted',
        PREG_RECURSION_LIMIT_ERROR  => 'Code 3 : Recursion limit was exhausted',
        PREG_BAD_UTF8_ERROR         => 'Code 4 : The offset didn\'t correspond to the begin of a valid UTF-8 code point',
        PREG_BAD_UTF8_OFFSET_ERROR  => 'Code 5 : Malformed UTF-8 data',
    );

    return $errors[preg_last_error()];
}

You can call this function using the follow code :

preg_match('/(?:\D+|<\d+>)*[!?]/', 'foobar foobar foobar');
echo is_preg_error();

Alternative - Regular Expression Online Tester

3
  • 2
    This is just a wrapper around preg_last_error specific for the English language. Oct 22, 2012 at 20:39
  • By the way, this will not really tell you if regex is valid or not. Consider this: php > preg_match("/aaa",""); php > echo preg_last_error(); 0
    – Alex N.
    Oct 6, 2013 at 5:41
  • PHP 7 added PREG_JIT_STACKLIMIT_ERROR. See the docs.
    – mbomb007
    Apr 1, 2019 at 21:11
15

If you want to dynamically test a regex preg_match(...) === false seems to be your only option. PHP doesn't have a mechanism for compiling regular expressions before they are used.

Also you may find preg_last_error an useful function.

On the other hand if you have a regex and just want to know if it's valid before using it there are a bunch of tools available out there. I found rubular.com to be pleasant to use.

6

You can check to see if it is a syntactically correct regex with this nightmare of a regex, if your engine supports recursion (PHP should).

You cannot, however algorithmically tell if it will give the results you want without running it.

From: Is there a regular expression to detect a valid regular expression?

/^((?:(?:[^?+*{}()[\]\\|]+|\\.|\[(?:\^?\\.|\^[^\\]|[^\\^])(?:[^\]\\]+|\\.)*\]|\((?:\?[:=!]|\?<[=!]|\?>)?(?1)??\)|\(\?(?:R|[+-]?\d+)\))(?:(?:[?+*]|\{\d+(?:,\d*)?\})[?+]?)?|\|)*)$/
2
  • Surely this can't possibly work in the general case? Apr 20, 2017 at 2:05
  • This regex is recursive. So, it's not a regex in the classical sense of the word, but it works in Perl Compatible Regular Expression engines.
    – ptmalcolm
    Sep 8, 2017 at 2:21
2

Without actually executing the regex you have no way to be sure if it's be valid. I've recently implemented a similar RegexValidator for Zend Framework. Works just fine.

<?php
class Nuke_Validate_RegEx extends Zend_Validate_Abstract
{
    /**
     * Error constant
     */
    const ERROR_INVALID_REGEX = 'invalidRegex';

    /**
     * Error messages
     * @var array
     */
    protected $_messageTemplates = array(
        self::ERROR_INVALID_REGEX => "This is a regular expression PHP cannot parse.");

    /**
     * Runs the actual validation
     * @param string $pattern The regular expression we are testing
     * @return bool
     */
    public function isValid($pattern)
    {
        if (@preg_match($pattern, "Lorem ipsum") === false) {
            $this->_error(self::ERROR_INVALID_REGEX);
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
}
1

You can validate your regular expression with a regular expression and up to a certain limit. Checkout this stack overflow answer for more info.

Note: a "recursive regular expression" is not a regular expression, and this extended version of regex doesn't match extended regexes.

A better option is to use preg_match and match against NULL as @Claudrian said

1

I am not sure if it supports PCRE, but there is a Chrome extension over at https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/cmmblmkfaijaadfjapjddbeaoffeccib called RegExp Tester. I have not used it as yet myself so I cannot vouch for it, but perhaps it could be of use?

0

I'd be inclined to set up a number of unit tests for your regex. This way not only would you be able to ensure that the regex is indeed valid but also effective at matching.

I find using TDD is an effective way to develop regex and means that extending it in the future is simplified as you already have all of your test cases available.

The answer to this question has a great answer on setting up your unit tests.

1
  • Thanks Rob. I'm a fan of TDD, but the code in question needs to be able to validate regex as an input (I'm validating JSON schemas, that can contain regex patterns). May 13, 2014 at 8:39
0

So in summary, for all those coming to this question you can validate regular expressions in PHP with a function like this.

preg_match() returns 1 if the pattern matches given subject, 0 if it does not, or FALSE if an error occurred. - PHP Manual

/**
 * Return an error message if the regular expression is invalid
 *
 * @param string $regex string to validate
 * @return string
 */
function invalidRegex($regex)
{
    if(preg_match($regex, null) !== false)
    {
        return '';
    }

    $errors = array(
        PREG_NO_ERROR               => 'Code 0 : No errors',
        PREG_INTERNAL_ERROR         => 'Code 1 : There was an internal PCRE error',
        PREG_BACKTRACK_LIMIT_ERROR  => 'Code 2 : Backtrack limit was exhausted',
        PREG_RECURSION_LIMIT_ERROR  => 'Code 3 : Recursion limit was exhausted',
        PREG_BAD_UTF8_ERROR         => 'Code 4 : The offset didn\'t correspond to the begin of a valid UTF-8 code point',
        PREG_BAD_UTF8_OFFSET_ERROR  => 'Code 5 : Malformed UTF-8 data',
    );

    return $errors[preg_last_error()];
}

Which can be used like this.

if($error = invalidRegex('/foo//'))
{
    die($error);
}
0

You could use valid() from T-Regx

pattern('InvalidRegular)Expression')->valid(); // bool (false)
-1

You should try to match the regular expression against NULL. If the result is FALSE (=== FALSE), there was an error.

In PHP >= 5.5, you can use the following to automatically get the built-in error message, without needing to define your own function to get it:

// For PHP >= 8, use the built-in strEndsWith instead of this function.
// Taken from https://www.php.net/manual/en/function.str-ends-with.php#125967
function endsWith($haystack, $needle) {
    $length = strlen($needle);
    return $length > 0 ? substr($haystack, -$length) === $needle : true;
}

function test_regex($regex) {
    preg_match($regex, NULL);
    $constants = get_defined_constants(true)['pcre'];
    foreach ($constants as $key => $value) {
        if (!endsWith($key, '_ERROR')) {
            unset($constants[$key]);
        }
    }
    return array_flip($constants)[preg_last_error()];
}

Try it online!

Note that the call to preg_match() will still throw a warning for invalid regular expressions. The warning can be caught with a custom error handler using set_error_handler().

See Can I try/catch a warning?.

2
  • array_flip isn't safe to use on the output from get_defined_constants(true)['pcre'] in later versions of PHP since one of the constants has a value of TRUE (boolean), and that will result in a warning being emitted.
    – GuyPaddock
    Apr 16, 2021 at 0:16
  • @GuyPaddock You are correct; thanks for pointing that out. I have improved the code to account for that by filtering the defined constants first. See the link to try the code in an online interpreter.
    – mbomb007
    Apr 16, 2021 at 17:12
-3

According to the PCRE reference, there is no such way to test validity of an expression, before it's used. But i think, if someone use an invalid expression, it's a design error in that application, not a run-time one, so you should be fine.

2
  • -1 as the OP's question was not before it's used but before it's used against real data. One thing is testing with 5MB of scraped data and another with an empty string that just verifies that the RegExp compiles. SO: In PHP you can test it, in C++ you can test it. In C++11 you get an exception thrown if it's invalid, in PHP you get the explicit false. Any RegExp is compiled before it's executed and that's where the errors occur as its compilation fails when it's illegal regardless if the data you'll use it against. Sheesh...
    – CodeAngry
    Oct 23, 2012 at 17:00
  • @Claudrian: i agree, but the question was not before it's used against real data, but preferably before it's used - and there is no such way (as an explicit / dedicated function). But i agree, if one really want to test it, it should be tested against null / empty value.
    – pozs
    Oct 23, 2012 at 17:10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.