4

I would like to draw a "pixelated" line in Java. Here is an example of what I mean by "pixelated" line:

Pixelated line

This is my what my code is trying to do. Assume that the line is going from (x1, y1) to (x2, y2) and that I want a line of 10 "blocks" length between them (I would call them pixels but they will be displayed using many pixels):

  1. Make a rectangle with (x1, y1) as (0, 0) and with width x2 - x1 and height y2 - y1.
  2. Calculate the hypotenuse of the triangle formed by that rectangle. Call that cOriginal.
  3. Rescale the rectangle so that the hypotenuse length is 10 long.
  4. Create a 2D boolean array of the size of the rescaled rectangle. Call that grid.
  5. Run the Bresenham Line Algorithm on that grid from top right corner, which is (0, 0) to the bottom left corner, marking grid spaces that are part of the line as true. I have assured that my Bresenham algorithm works in all quadrants and in all cases.
  6. This is the part I'm a bit fuzzy on. Currently, I first define 2 variables that "scale up" the grid. These are defined as follows:

    float widthScalingFactor = (float) widthOriginal / (float) newWidth; float heightScalingFactor = (float) heightOriginal / (float) newHeight;

(I have no idea why thats not formatting...) Next I loop through grid and if grid[i][j] (is true), I draw a rectangle of width and height of 10 at (x1 + (i * widthScalingFactor), yOffset + (j * heightScalingFactor)).

Here is the current method:

public static void drawPixelatedLine(Graphics g, int x1, int y1, int x2, int y2) {

    int widthOriginal = x2 - x1;
    int heightOriginal = y2 - y1;

    if(widthOriginal <= 0 && heightOriginal <= 0){

        int temp = x2;
        x2 = x1;
        x1 = temp;

        temp = y2;
        y2 = y1;
        y1 = temp;

    }

    double cOriginal = Math.sqrt(widthOriginal * widthOriginal + heightOriginal * heightOriginal);

    double shrinkingFactor = 10d / cOriginal;

    int newWidth = (int) Math.round(shrinkingFactor * widthOriginal);
    int newHeight = (int) Math.round(shrinkingFactor * heightOriginal);

    newWidth = (newWidth <= 0 ? 1 : newWidth);
    newHeight = (newHeight <= 0 ? 1 : newHeight);

    boolean[][] grid = new boolean[newWidth][newHeight];

    int rescaledX1 = 0;
    int rescaledY1 = 0;

    int rescaledX2 = newWidth - 1;
    int rescaledY2 = newHeight - 1;

    int x = rescaledX1;
    int y = rescaledY1;

    int dx = Math.abs(rescaledX2 - rescaledX1);
    int dy = Math.abs(rescaledY2 - rescaledY1);

    int s1 = Utils.sign(rescaledX2 - rescaledX1);
    int s2 = Utils.sign(rescaledY2 - rescaledY1);

    boolean swap = false;

    if (dy > dx) {

        int temp = dx;
        dx = dy;
        dy = temp;

        swap = true;

    }

    int D = 2 * dy - dx;

    for (int i = 0; i < dx; i += 1) {

        grid[x][y] = true;

        while (D >= 0) {

            D = D - 2 * dx;

            if (swap) {

                x += s1;

            }

            else {

                y += s2;

            }

        }

        D = D + 2 * dy;

        if (swap) {

            y += s2;

        }

        else {

            x += s1;

        }

    }

    int xOffset = x1;
    int yOffset = y1;

    float widthScalingFactor = (float) widthOriginal / (float) newWidth;
    float heightScalingFactor = (float) heightOriginal / (float) newHeight;

    for(int i = 0; i < grid.length; i++){

        for(int j = 0; j < grid[0].length; j++){

            if(grid[i][j]){

                g.fillRect((int) (xOffset + (i * widthScalingFactor)), (int) (yOffset + (j * heightScalingFactor)), 10, 10);

            }

        }

    }

Right now this code partially works when drawing in any cardinal direction and northwest and southeast, although the size of the rectangles I am drawing seem to be wrong (this is likely because I am trying to draw 10 squares of size 10 across a distance that is likely more than ~140 pixels. However, when I try to draw a line northeast or southwest, it just draws a horizontal line. Here are some examples.

This is a line going northwest and working properly (I can fix the whole stretching/gaps issue). Example 1

Here is a line that is going northeast and as you can see it is simply just a straight line going east from the origin to the x position of the destination. A similar thing happens when drawing lines southwest except it goes south and stops at the destination's y position. Example 2

Currently as you can see if the line is going northwest I just flip the 2 points around so it is going southeast. However, I feel that my current approach isn't quite right and would require a lot of modification just to accommodate the last 2 cases.

How could I modify my current algorithm or make a new one to draw a "pixelated" line?

  • If you look at Bresenham's line algorithm, you might find something useful. – byxor Jun 7 '17 at 16:21
  • @byxor I have made sure my Bresnham algorithm works for all cases – Dylan Siegler Jun 7 '17 at 16:23
  • Oops, I didn't realise you were already using it. I never fully read your question. – byxor Jun 7 '17 at 16:34
  • What effect do you want to achieve exactly? Do you want every line to be composed of 10 rectangles or do you just want to emulate a lower pixel resolution, e.g. each drawn pixel is 10x10 pixels on screen? Whats the point of the intermediate array, it strikes me as much simpler to just replace the plot(x, y) in bresenhams line to paint bigger pixels (and replace the stepping values dx/dy with bigger values, too). How do you want to handle accuracy issues, e.g. (15, 15)-(30, 30) which would be 1.5 10x10 rectangles "long"? – Durandal Jun 7 '17 at 16:58
  • @Durandal I am trying to get the line to look lower resolution, yes. I took one try at the modification you suggested and it didn't work as I was incrementing x and y. Would you just just do dx = whatever it is now * 10 and same with dy then just draw a bigger square? – Dylan Siegler Jun 7 '17 at 17:02
3

This code demonstrates an approach where all coordinates are scaled to a lower resoultion, then the line is drawn in the lower resolution while scaling up again in the plot(x, y) function.

The obvious side effect is that the lines endpoints are subject to rounding (actually truncating) to the lower resolution.

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.event.MouseAdapter;
import java.awt.event.MouseEvent;

import javax.swing.JComponent;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

public class BresenhamBlocky {

    static class TestPanel extends JPanel {
        public TestPanel() {
            setPreferredSize(new Dimension(800, 800));
        }

        @Override
        protected void paintComponent(final Graphics g) {
            super.paintComponent(g);
            int w = getWidth();
            int h = getHeight();
            g.setColor(Color.GRAY);
            g.fillRect(0, 0, w, h);
            g.setColor(Color.BLUE);
            drawLine(g, w >> 1, h >> 1, targetX, targetY, 10);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] argv) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(() -> { showTest(); });
    }

    static int targetX, targetY;

    static void showTest() {
        JFrame frame = new JFrame("Test");
        JComponent test = new TestPanel();
        test.setFocusable(true);
        test.addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {
            @Override
            public void mousePressed(MouseEvent e) {
                targetX = e.getX();
                targetY = e.getY();
                e.getComponent().repaint();
            }
        });
        frame.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
        frame.add(test, BorderLayout.CENTER);
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frame.pack();
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void drawLine(Graphics g, int x0, int y0, int x1, int y1, int blockSize) {
        int scaledX0 = x0 / blockSize;
        int scaledY0 = y0 / blockSize;
        int scaledX1 = x1 / blockSize;
        int scaledY1 = y1 / blockSize;
        int dx = scaledX1 - scaledX0;
        int dy = scaledY1 - scaledY0;
        int stepX = Integer.signum(dx);
        int stepY = Integer.signum(dy);
        dx = Math.abs(dx);
        dy = Math.abs(dy);
        int dx2 = dx << 1;
        int dy2 = dy << 1;
        int x = scaledX0;
        int y = scaledY0;
        int error;
        if (dx >= dy) {
            error = dy2 - dx;
            do {
                plot(g, x, y, blockSize);
                if (error > 0) {
                    y += stepY;
                    error -= dx2;
                }
                error += dy2;
                x += stepX;
            } while (x != scaledX1);
        } else {
            error = dx2 - dy;
            do {
                plot(g, x, y, blockSize);
                if (error > 0) {
                    x += stepX;
                    error -= dy2;
                }
                error += dx2;
                y += stepY;
            } while (y != scaledY1);
        }
    }

    static void plot(Graphics g, int x, int y, int blockSize) {
        int x0 = x * blockSize;
        int y0 = y * blockSize;
        int w = blockSize;
        int h = blockSize;
        g.fillRect(x0, y0, w, h);
    }

}

(Use mouse click to move one endpoint of the line)

  • Amazing thanks! – Dylan Siegler Jun 7 '17 at 17:49
  • @DylanSiegler I edited the code once to fix an oversight that lines were drawn one pixel too short. Check if you got the edited or the old one (replaces while() {} with do {} while) – Durandal Jun 7 '17 at 17:51

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