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I'm working on a 2D video game framework, and I've never written a game loop before. Most frameworks I've ever looked in to seem to implement both a draw and update methods.

For my project I implemented a loop that calls these 2 methods. I noticed with other frameworks, these methods don't always get called alternating. Some frameworks will have update run way more than draw does. Also, most of these types of frameworks will run at 60FPS. I figure I'll need some sort of sleep in here.

My question is, what is the best method for implementing this type of loop? Do I call draw then update, or vice versa? In my case, I'm writing a wrapper around SDL2, so maybe that library requires something to be setup in a certain way?

Here's some "pseudo" code I'm thinking of for the implementation.

loop do
  clear_screen
  draw
  update
  sleep(16.milliseconds)
  break if window_is_closed
end

Though my project is being written in Crystal-Lang, I'm more looking for a general concept that could be applied to any language.

  • 2
    Not directly related, but you may want to rethink having a full blown clear_screen step. That's potentially expensive and not always necessary. The caller may want to only clear small sections that changed to save CPU time. – Carcigenicate Jun 7 '17 at 18:04
  • And to me at least, if makes more sense to update then draw. If you do it the other way around, you'll always be drawing the previous frame instead of the current one. – Carcigenicate Jun 7 '17 at 18:05
  • Ok, that makes sense! These are the things I'm looking for. Thanks :D – jeremywoertink Jun 7 '17 at 18:24
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It depends what you want to achieve. Some games prefer the game logic to run more frequently than the frame rate (I believe Source games do this), for some games you may want the game logic to run less frequently (the only example of this I can think of is the servers of some multiplayer games, quite famously Overwatch).

It's important to consider as well that this is a question of resolution, not speed. A game with logic rate 120 and frame rate 60 is not necessarily running at x2 speed, any time critical operations within the game logic should be done relative to the clock*, not the tic rate, or your game will literally go into slow motion if the frames take too long to render.

I would recommend writing a loop like this:

loop do
    time_until_update = (update_interval + time_of_last_update) - current_time
    time_until_draw = (draw_interval + time_of_last_draw) - current_time
    work_done = false

    # Update the game if it's been enough time
    if time_until_update <= 0
        update
        time_of_last_update = current_time
        work_done = true
    end

    # Draw the screen if it's been enough time
    if time_until_draw <= 0
        clear_screen
        draw
        time_of_last_draw = current_time
        work_done = true
    end

    # Nothing to do, sleep for the smallest period
    if work_done == false
        smaller = time_until_update

        if time_until_draw < smaller
            smaller = time_until_draw
        end

        sleep_for(smaller)
    end

    # Leave, maybe
    break if window_is_closed
end

You don't want to wait for 16ms every frame otherwise you might end up over-waiting if the frame takes a non-trivial amount of time to complete. The work_done variable is so that we know whether or not the intervals we calculated at the start of the loop are still valid, we may have done 5ms of work, which would throw our sleeping completely off so in that scenario we go back around and calculate fresh values.

* You may want to abstractify the clock, using the clock directly can have some weird effects, for example if you save the game and you save the last time you used a magical power as a clock time, it will instantly come off cooldown when you load the save, as that is now minutes, hours or even days in the past. Similar issues exist with the process being suspended by the operating system.

  • Wow! Thanks for the detailed explanation. This totally makes sense. I figured my example was missing quite a bit, but that was where the confusion was. In my case, these games will all be basic 2D games, so nothing massive like overwatch. Also, framerate won't need to be crazy as the games made with this framework won't really be too huge. I'll try to implement like this, and see how it goes. Should I start with update_interval of 60, and draw_interval of 120? – jeremywoertink Jun 10 '17 at 22:41
  • 1
    I assume you mean 120 iterations per second, rather than 120ms (which is only 8.3 iterations per second). I would start with a rate of 60/s for both and raise the rate for the updating if the hardware allows and it improves your game's precision (for example in many physics systems it prevents objects phasing through walls). There's little point raising the draw rate as there are very few monitors in the world capable of >60fps. (Though perhaps include an option for people who do have those monitors?) – user573949 Jun 11 '17 at 4:28
  • I actually meant just the raw values. In your example you defined a variable for update_interval and a draw_interval variable. I was curious what the starting values for these variables you would suggest. Also, when dealing with time like current_time, do you suggest using seconds? Or should this be milliseconds? – jeremywoertink Jun 11 '17 at 18:14
  • I would always use milliseconds, seconds are enormous for most games, it can mess with things like animating a regenerating health bar for example. For the raw values I would use the actual size of the interval, so for 60 iterations a second that would be 1000/60 = 16/17 milliseconds. – user573949 Jun 12 '17 at 19:38

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