5

Lately, I have been seeing a lot of (commercial) code that throws and catches the exact same exception, similar to the code below:

public class Foo {
    public void bar() throws AnException {
        // do something (1)
        try {
            // do something (2) -- able to throw AnException
        } catch (AnException ex) {
            throw ex;
        }
        // do something (3)
    }
}

Contrast this to:

public class Foo {
    public void bar() throws AnException {
        // do something (1)
        // do something (2) -- able to throw AnException
        // do something (3)
    }
}

Does the former actually accomplish anything, in either behavior or semantics or else? Will it have any effect on code performance (time and space) or does it help readability?

P.S. this question is very different from this question.

EDIT: The catch block in the former doesn't do anything else other than rethrowing the caught exception.

8
  • 1
    Yes, it serves to make code more readable. You are informing the reader that such an exception can arise through execution of that particular block of code. This, in contrast to the obvious other reason that you want to do something with the caught error (say add it to an exception message list, or log it perhaps), but that you still want it reported.
    – cs95
    Jun 7 '17 at 18:11
  • 4
    @Shiva - But it doesn't preclude do something (1) or do something (3) from also throwing AnException. So it doesn't really provide any more information than the throws declaration for the method itself. Much better would be a comment clarifying what's going on.
    – Ted Hopp
    Jun 7 '17 at 18:13
  • @TedHopp But if there is a chance of that happening, then they should all go into the try-catch block, right?
    – cs95
    Jun 7 '17 at 18:14
  • @Shiva - Then there would still be no need for the try-catch statement at all.
    – Ted Hopp
    Jun 7 '17 at 18:15
  • @TedHopp yes, there would, if you wanted to cover all bases with error handling. I've edited my first comment.
    – cs95
    Jun 7 '17 at 18:17
7

It makes no sense for sure assuming code you provided. Rethrowing exceptions makes sense when you want to handle this exception somehow (e.g. log it) but want it to be handled further in a stack trace.

Regarding commercial code, maybe the reason you saw it was that there was some handling logic initially that was removed but exceptions rethrowing wasn't removed. I saw such situations several times.

2
  • It can be useful when debugging, since it allows you to place a breakpoint on the re-throw statement, and then you can examine the function arguments (and other local variables declared outside the try clause).
    – FredK
    Jun 7 '17 at 18:22
  • 2
    @FredK - Most debuggers allow you to break on an exception being thrown. You don't need a do-nothing try/catch statement for that.
    – Ted Hopp
    Jun 7 '17 at 18:25
7

This is a violation of a basic rule:

The code should catch only the exceptions that it knows how to handle.

Oracle's guidelines suggests that each time you throw an exception, you should supply something useful for the code that catches your exception (see page 3 of Effective Java Exceptions). Catching an exception simply to re-throw it serves no practical purpose, because there is no additional information added to it for the code above it in the invocation chain, and no information extracted by the method itself.

1

There's no reason for the try/catch in the code you posted. As with @nickolay.laptev's answer, I believe that if you find this in commercial code, it's probably left over cruft from something that used to be meaningful.

Aside from some sort of partial error handling, there's another use case for simply catching and rethrowing an exception. This would be to prevent the exception from being caught by a subsequent, more general, catch clause. So, for instance, if you wanted to handle every exception other than instances of AnException, you would either have to do a type check:

try {
    // stuff
} catch (Exception ex) {
    if (ex instanceof AnException) {
        throw ex; // rethrow since we're not handling it
    } else {
        // handle all other exceptions
    }
}

or use something like this (which, in my view, is cleaner and more readable):

try {
    // stuff
} catch (AnException) {
    throw ex;
} catch (Exception ex) {
    // handle all other exceptions
}

Then if you later decided to not handle all those other exceptions, you'd delete the second catch clause and end up with the code you posted.

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