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When i attempted to implement min function in C as C lacks this function the compiler gives an error. I've used type of for implementing it just like this

MIN and MAX in C

My code

For quick reference:

>#define min(a,b) \
  ({ typeof (a) _a = (a); \
  typeof (b) _b = (b); \        //Min defined
  _a < _b ? _a : _b; })
  .
  .
  .
  c= min(c+floor(1.0/f), bi.biWidth) ;
  r= min(r+floor(1.0/f),abs(bi.biHeight)) ;

Error generated:

 >make resize
 clang -fsanitize=integer -fsanitize=undefined -ggdb3 -O0 -std=c11 -Wall       
 -Werror -Wextra -Wno-sign-compare -Wshadow    resize.c  -lcrypt -lcs50      
 -lm  -o resize

resize.c:191:18: error: implicit declaration of function 'typeof' is    
invalid in C99 [-Werror,-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
          c= min(c+floor(1.0/f), bi.biWidth) ;
             ^
resize.c:11:6: note: expanded from macro 'min'
({ typeof (a) _a = (a); \
 ^
 resize.c:191:18: error: expected ';' after expression
 resize.c:11:17: note: expanded from macro 'min'
 ({ typeof (a) _a = (a); \
            ^

 resize.c:191:18: error: use of undeclared identifier '_a'

 resize.c:11:17: note: expanded from macro 'min'
 ({ typeof (a) _a = (a); \
            ^

 resize.c:191:18: error: expected ';' after expression

 resize.c:12:18: note: expanded from macro 'min'
  typeof (b) _b = (b); \

                  ^

 resize.c:191:18: error: use of undeclared identifier '_b'

 resize.c:12:18: note: expanded from macro 'min'
  typeof (b) _b = (b); \
             ^

 resize.c:191:18: error: use of undeclared identifier '_a'

 resize.c:13:5: note: expanded from macro 'min'
 _a < _b ? _a : _b; })
 ^

 resize.c:191:18: error: use of undeclared identifier '_b'

 resize.c:13:10: note: expanded from macro 'min'
 _a < _b ? _a : _b; })
     ^

 resize.c:191:18: error: use of undeclared identifier '_b'

 resize.c:13:20: note: expanded from macro 'min'
 _a < _b ? _a : _b; })
               ^

 resize.c:193:13: error: expected ';' after expression
     r= min(r+floor(1.0/f),abs(bi.biHeight)) ;
        ^

 resize.c:11:17: note: expanded from macro 'min'
  ({ typeof (a) _a = (a); \
            ^

 resize.c:193:13: error: use of undeclared identifier '_a'

 resize.c:11:17: note: expanded from macro 'min'
 ({ typeof (a) _a = (a); \
            ^

 resize.c:193:13: error: expected ';' after expression

 resize.c:12:18: note: expanded from macro 'min'
  typeof (b) _b = (b); \
             ^

 resize.c:193:13: error: use of undeclared identifier '_b'

 resize.c:12:18: note: expanded from macro 'min'
  typeof (b) _b = (b); \
             ^

 resize.c:193:13: error: use of undeclared identifier '_a'

 resize.c:13:5: note: expanded from macro 'min'
 _a < _b ? _a : _b; })
 ^

 resize.c:193:13: error: use of undeclared identifier '_b'

 resize.c:13:10: note: expanded from macro 'min'
 _a < _b ? _a : _b; })
     ^

 resize.c:193:13: error: use of undeclared identifier '_b'

 resize.c:13:20: note: expanded from macro 'min'
 _a < _b ? _a : _b; })
               ^

 15 errors generated.
0

It should be:

#define min(a,b) \
   ({ __typeof__ (a) _a = (a); \
      __typeof__ (b) _b = (b); // Min defined \
      _a < _b ? _a : _b; })

Your comment should not be after the \ but before it. Also you write typeof without the underscores. It is recommended to use them, the explanation is given here at SO.

typeof(), __typeof__() and __typeof() are compiler-specific extensions to the C language, because standard C does not include such an operator.


Macro without typeof:

If your compiler does not support the typeof "operator", you could define the min macro without typeof:

#define min(a,b) (((a) < (b)) ? (a) : (b))

But with that you will have side effects when using postfix or prefix in/decrement operators on variables, because a double evaluation will occur.


Inline function:

The other possibility to make it safe is an inline function. It will be typesafe and no double evaluation will happen:

inline int min(int a, int b)
{
   if (a < b)
   {
      return a;
   }
   return b;
}

You loose type genericity, but there is no other way. You could also think of using double since integers will be implicitly casted. But remember the loose of precision.

  • What's the difference between both? I've used this documentation code of typeof gcc doc – Prabhat Sharma Jun 7 '17 at 19:05
  • Moreover it didn't solved the problem! The errors are almost same except instead of typeof there is typeof – Prabhat Sharma Jun 7 '17 at 19:08
  • Means it's all compiler specific and we should not use it. Right? But how then we define min or max function in C? – Prabhat Sharma Jun 7 '17 at 19:12
  • You could implement it without of the use of typeof: #define min(a,b) (((a) < (b)) ? (a) : (b)). – Andre Kampling Jun 7 '17 at 19:15
  • 1
    But this will cause problem in some cases like if we write (++a, ++b) etc. See this stackoverflow.com/questions/3437404/min-and-max-in-c But I admit this will not cause any problem in my case! – Prabhat Sharma Jun 7 '17 at 19:21

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