24

First, consider this C++ code:

#include <stdio.h>

struct foo_int {
    void print(int x) {
        printf("int %d\n", x);
    }    
};

struct foo_str {
    void print(const char* x) {
        printf("str %s\n", x);
    }    
};

struct foo : foo_int, foo_str {
    //using foo_int::print;
    //using foo_str::print;
};

int main() {
    foo f;
    f.print(123);
    f.print("abc");
}

As expected according to the Standard, this fails to compile, because print is considered separately in each base class for the purpose of overload resolution, and thus the calls are ambiguous. This is the case on Clang (4.0), gcc (6.3) and MSVC (17.0) - see godbolt results here.

Now consider the following snippet, the sole difference of which is that we use operator() instead of print:

#include <stdio.h>

struct foo_int {
    void operator() (int x) {
        printf("int %d\n", x);
    }    
};

struct foo_str {
    void operator() (const char* x) {
        printf("str %s\n", x);
    }    
};

struct foo : foo_int, foo_str {
    //using foo_int::operator();
    //using foo_str::operator();
};

int main() {
    foo f;
    f(123);
    f("abc");
}

I would expect the results to be identical to the previous case, but it is not the case - while gcc still complains, Clang and MSVC can compile this fine!

Question #1: who is correct in this case? I expect it to be gcc, but the fact that two other unrelated compilers give a consistently different result here makes me wonder whether I'm missing something in the Standard, and things are different for operators when they're not invoked using function syntax.

Also note that if you only uncomment one of the using declarations, but not the other, then all three compilers will fail to compile, because they will only consider the function brought in by using during overload resolution, and thus one of the calls will fail due to type mismatch. Remember this; we'll get back to it later.

Now consider the following code:

#include <stdio.h>

auto print_int = [](int x) {
    printf("int %d\n", x);
};
typedef decltype(print_int) foo_int;

auto print_str = [](const char* x) {
    printf("str %s\n", x);
};
typedef decltype(print_str) foo_str;

struct foo : foo_int, foo_str {
    //using foo_int::operator();
    //using foo_str::operator();
    foo(): foo_int(print_int), foo_str(print_str) {}
};

int main() {
    foo f;
    f(123);
    f("foo");
}

Again, same as before, except now we don't define operator() explicitly, but instead get it from a lambda type. Again, you'd expect the results to be consistent with the previous snippet; and this is true for the case where both using declarations are commented out, or if both are uncommented. But if you only comment out one but not the other, things are suddenly different again: now only MSVC complains as I would expect it to, while Clang and gcc both think it's fine - and use both inherited members for overload resolution, despite only one being brought in by using!

Question #2: who is correct in this case? Again, I'd expect it to be MSVC, but then why do both Clang and gcc disagree? And, more importantly, why this is different from the previous snippet? I would expect the lambda type to behave exactly the same as a manually defined type with overloaded operator()...

0
7

Barry got #1 right. Your #2 hit a corner case: captureless nongeneric lambdas have an implicit conversion to function pointer, which got used in the mismatch case. That is, given

struct foo : foo_int, foo_str {
    using foo_int::operator();
    //using foo_str::operator();
    foo(): foo_int(print_int), foo_str(print_str) {}
} f;

using fptr_str = void(*)(const char*);

f("hello") is equivalent to f.operator fptr_str()("hello"), converting the foo to an pointer-to-function and calling that. If you compile at -O0 you can actually see the call to the conversion function in the assembly before it gets optimized away. Put an init-capture in print_str, and you'll see an error since the implicit conversion goes away.

For more, see [over.call.object].

7
  • Whoa, I've never seen this before. Interesting. – Barry Jun 8 '17 at 21:35
  • 2
    Ahh, nice! So gcc is the only one that is consistently correct here. Not what I expected. – Pavel Minaev Jun 9 '17 at 0:54
  • Although I'm still unclear as to why having the using for the other operator() makes this different. I understand why this using makes the int call legal; but why would it affect the string literal call at all? – Pavel Minaev Jun 9 '17 at 1:06
  • Or, alternatively - why doesn't the same logic kick in when there are no usings at all? shouldn't it just build the candidate set out of both inherited conversion operators, which would then be unambiguously resolved in favor of either function pointer conversion based on the argument type? – Pavel Minaev Jun 9 '17 at 1:06
  • 1
    @PavelMinaev The two conversion functions return different types and therefore have different names. So they are never ambiguous. What is ambiguous - if you have no using - is the name lookup for the function call operator. – T.C. Jun 10 '17 at 11:28
4

The rule for name lookup in base classes of a class C only happens if C itself doesn't directly contain the name is [class.member.lookup]/6:

The following steps define the result of merging lookup set S(f,Bi) into the intermediate S(f,C):

  • If each of the subobject members of S(f,Bi) is a base class subobject of at least one of the subobject members of S(f,C), or if S(f,Bi) is empty, S(f,C) is unchanged and the merge is complete. Conversely, if each of the subobject members of S(f,C) is a base class subobject of at least one of the subobject members of S(f,Bi), or if S(f,C) is empty, the new S(f,C) is a copy of S(f,Bi).

  • Otherwise, if the declaration sets of S(f,Bi) and S(f,C) differ, the merge is ambiguous: the new S(f,C) is a lookup set with an invalid declaration set and the union of the subobject sets. In subsequent merges, an invalid declaration set is considered different from any other.

  • Otherwise, the new S(f,C) is a lookup set with the shared set of declarations and the union of the subobject sets.

If we have two base classes, that each declare the same name, that the derived class does not bring in with a using-declaration, lookup of that name in the derived class would run afoul of that second bullet point and the lookup should fail. All of your examples are basically the same in this regard.

Question #1: who is correct in this case?

gcc is correct. The only difference between print and operator() is the name that we're looking up.

Question #2: who is correct in this case?

This is the same question as #1 - except we have lambdas (which give you unnamed class types with overload operator()) instead of explicit class types. The code should be ill-formed for the same reason. At least for gcc, this is bug 58820.

3
  • Note that for the second question, the case analogous to that in the bug you linked to - where there's no "using" - is rejected by gcc (so it would seem that the bug is fixed?). There's a different bug here where specifying "using" for only one of the bases is somehow sufficient to make operators from both part of the overload resolution set. – Pavel Minaev Jun 8 '17 at 17:57
  • The last case is a MSVC bug (for the comment-only-one-out case). Name lookup is unambiguous, and the implicit conversion to function pointer gets used for the call that doesn't match the named operator(). – T.C. Jun 8 '17 at 20:42
  • Hmm, 58820 is a bogus complaint that GCC reports an ambiguity when there is in fact one. It should have been closed as invalid. – T.C. Jun 11 '17 at 1:37
0

Your analysis of the first code is incorrect. There is no overload resolution.

The name lookup process occurs wholly before overload resolution. Name lookup determines which scope an id-expression is resolved to.

If a unique scope is found via the name look-up rules, then overload resolution begins: all instances of that name within that scope form the overload set.

But in your code, name lookup fails. The name is not declared in foo, so base classes are searched. If the name is found in more than one immediate base class then the program is ill-formed and the error message describes it as an ambiguous name.


The name lookup rules do not have special cases for overloaded operators. You should find that the code:

f.operator()(123);

fails for the same reason as f.print failed. However, there is another issue in your second code. f(123) is NOT defined as always meaning f.operator()(123);. In fact the definition in C++14 is in [over.call]:

operator() shall be a non-static member function with an arbitrary number of parameters. It can have default arguments. It implements the function call syntax

postfix-expression ( expression-list opt )

where the postfix-expression evaluates to a class object and the possibly empty expression-list matches the parameter list of an operator() member function of the class. Thus, a call x(arg1,...) is interpreted as x.operator()(arg1, ...) for a class object x of type T if T::operator()(T1, T2, T3) exists and if the operator is selected as the best match function by the overload resolution mechanism (13.3.3).

This actually seems an imprecise specification to me so I can understand different compilers coming out with different results. What is T1,T2,T3? Does it mean the types of the arguments? (I suspect not). What are T1,T2,T3 when multiple operator() function exist, only taking one argument?

And what is meant by "if T::operator() exists" anyway? It could perhaps mean any of the following:

  1. operator() is declared in T.
  2. Unqualified lookup of operator() in the scope of T succeeds and performing overload resolution on that lookup set with the given arguments succeeds.
  3. Qualified lookup of T::operator() in the calling context succeeds and performing overload resolution on that lookup set with the given arguments succeeds.
  4. Something else?

To proceed from here (for me anyway) I would like to understand why the standard didn't simply say that f(123) means f.operator()(123);, the former being ill-formed if and only if the latter is ill-formed. The motivation behind the actual wording might reveal the intent and therefore which compiler's behaviour matches the intent.

6
  • 1
    The reason it doesn't say f(123) means f.operator()(123) is to allow things like implicit conversion of expression f to a pointer to function type. See @T.C.'s answer. – aschepler Jun 8 '17 at 22:49
  • @aschepler OK. It's still not clear to me what "if T::operator()(T1, T2, T3) exists" means (and whether such an operator exists in OP's code) – M.M Jun 8 '17 at 22:55
  • Yeah, that's a pretty terrible paragraph. – aschepler Jun 8 '17 at 23:07
  • @aschepler I posted on the forum about it but the response was basically shrug? – Barry Jun 9 '17 at 14:09
  • @Barry Just file an editorial issue and (eventually) someone will probably look at it. – T.C. Jun 11 '17 at 1:39

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