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I'm new to React and the concepts are still new to me. I'm working on this example and I would like to know if it would be possible to re-write it in another way and avoid using .bind altogether. The goal here is just to minimize the code written required as much as possible!

Full example can be found here:

https://codepen.io/akamali/pen/awvqeM

The component simply render a menu list and when you click on an item it highlight the selected text.

ES5

<ul className='languages'>
      {languages.map(function (lang) {
        return (
          <li
            style={lang === this.state.selectedLanguage ? {color: '#d0021b'} : null}
            onClick={this.updateLanguage.bind(null, lang)}
            key={lang}>
              {lang}
          </li>
        )
      }, this)}
    </ul>

**ES6 => **

<ul className='languages'>
      {languages.map(lang => {
        return (
          <li
            style={lang === this.state.selectedLanguage ? {color: '#d0021b'} : null}
            onClick={this.updateLanguage.bind(null, lang)}
            key={lang}>
              {lang}
          </li>
        )
      },)}
    </ul>
  • 1
    () => this.updateLanguage(lang) – zerkms Jun 8 '17 at 9:12
  • @zerkms that is not preferred as it is less performant than .bind – John Ruddell Jun 8 '17 at 9:13
  • @JohnRuddell "as it is less performant than .bind" --- it is implementation specific. The standard does not tell how one should perform. And it would be transpiled anyway. – zerkms Jun 8 '17 at 9:16
  • if updateLanguage's body has code like this.x then binding to null will make it throw NullPointerException, you probably want to bind to this – niceman Jun 8 '17 at 9:18
  • 1
    @zerkms that is true. It could be different :) I need to look at any differences of when .bind is used or when an inline arrow is used. Before they were compiled differently.. but that could have changed since now. Good point! – John Ruddell Jun 8 '17 at 9:37
2

What you want to do is make each item a component, this way there is no inline binding in your render

{languages.map(lang => <ListItem lang={lang} updateLanguage={this.updateLanguage} selected={lang === this.state.selectedLanguage } />)}

and then your list item handles the click with a single bound instance.

class ListItem extends Component {
    handleClick = () => {
        this.props.updateLanguage(this.props.lang);
    }
    render() {
        return (
            <li 
                style={this.props.selected ? {color: '#d0021b'} : null}
                onClick={this.handleClick}
            >
                {this.props.lang}
            </li>
        )
    }
}
  • You also need to bind this.handleClick in the constructor. – zerkms Jun 8 '17 at 9:25
  • 1
    @zerkms no because handleClick is an arrow function. assuming your compiler accepts the arrow on function declaration. Thats how I write all of my functions I want bound in a react class – John Ruddell Jun 8 '17 at 9:26
  • 1
    Oh, I did not know that, thanks. It's not standardised yet though. – zerkms Jun 8 '17 at 9:27
  • @zerkms yea, if you are using babel to compile then this answer would help someone get setup. I like typescript and with typescript using the ts-loader in webpack the fat arrow functions are standardized! – John Ruddell Jun 8 '17 at 9:42
  • It's class member variables tc39.github.io/proposal-class-public-fields. Fat arrows are there from ES2015. – zerkms Jun 8 '17 at 9:45
-1

First you bind to null, if updateLanguage has code like this :

updateLanguage(lang){
    this.x;
}

It will throw a null pointer exception, you probably wanted to bind to this.

Now why would anyone bind ? to explain this look at example definition of updateLanguage :

updateLanguage(lang){
    this.setState({language: lang});
}

In this function we want this to be the React component as we're using setState here.

But when you register events with this function then whoever triggers the event will be this inside updateLanguage's body, so this above will be e.g. li which doesn't have setState.

By binding you make sure this will be the component, anyway you can get rid of binding by doing this :

<li
    onClick={() => this.updateLanguage(lang)}            
</li>

Because when registering it as an arrow function we're actually registering a closure which closes over this which is the component here, I leave it to you whether you like this style or not.

Another way is to use propery syntax initializer e.g. :

updateLanguage : (lang) => {
}

And then

  <li
      onClick={this.updateLanguage(lang)}            
  </li>

These ways are mentioned in React Docs by the way, see here : https://facebook.github.io/react/docs/handling-events.html

  • would you be able to put a working example with your suggestion? I would appreciate that! Thanks – user2398069 Jun 8 '17 at 18:52

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