2

I'm trying to do a predicate of average in Prolog, but I'm facing some problems,

it's called average(N,X), with N is a number, and X is the result of the average from 1 to N .

I've tried to do this, but it doesn't always work well :

       average(1,1).
       average(N,X) :- K is N-1 ,K>1 , average(K,S1) , X is /(+(S1,N),N).
       average(N,X) :- K is N-1 ,K=:=1 , average(K,S1) , X is +(S1,N).

Some help ?

2
  • 2
    For ease of reading, you can write X is (S1 + N)/N instead of X is /(+(S1,N),N). is/2 does understand /, +, etc, as operators.
    – lurker
    Jun 9 '17 at 1:57
  • 2
    Doesn't always work well... Think about your rule... is it really true that the average of 1 to N is (S+N)/N if the average of 1 to (N-1) is S? That doesn't sound mathematically correct. Why don't you do it the old fashioned way and sum up the numbers first, then divide by N?
    – lurker
    Jun 9 '17 at 2:24
5

Let's look at some of the averages of the sum from 1 to n:

n = 1: 1/1       = 1
n = 2: (1+2)/2   = 3/2
n = 3: (1+2+3)/3 = 2
...

Now in a way it feels that the elements between 1 and n don't really matter, there's always 1/2 added. So let's assume that (1+...n)/n = (1+n)/2. How do we prove this for a general n? Let's try induction, i.e. let's show that we can do the base step from n=0 to n=1 and then, assuming our formula holds for an arbitrary n, we show that the formula also holds for n+1.

  • Base case: for n=0 we have (1+1)/2=1 and for n=1 we have (1+2)/2=1.5 -- exactly what we wanted.
  • Step case: let's assume that (1+...+n)/n = (1+n)/2. We need to show that then also (1+...+n+(n+1))/(n+1) = (1+(n+1))/2. We can split up the fraction into two parts:

    (1+...+n+(n+1))/(n+1) =
    (1+...+n)/(n+1) + (n+1)/(n+1) =
    (1+...+n)/(n+1) + 1
    

    Now we need to do something about the division by (n+1), so let's write the fraction in a different manner:

    (1+...+n)/(n+1) + 1 =
    (1+...+n)/n * (n/(n+1)) + 1
    

    Now we can use the hypothesis that (1+...+n)/n = (1+n)/2 and simplify:

    (1+...+n)/n * (n/(n+1)) + 1 =
    (1+n)/2 * (n/(n+1)) + 1 =
    n/2 + 1 =
    (n+2)/2 =
    (1 + (n+1))/2
    

    That's exactly what we want!

Now let's make a program out of it:

avg(N,X) :- X is (1+N)/2.

It gives the expected results:

?- between(1,10,C), avg(C,X).
C = X, X = 1 ;
C = 2,
X = 1.5 ;
C = 3,
X = 2 ;
C = 4,
X = 2.5 ;
C = 5,
X = 3 ;
C = 6,
X = 3.5 ;
C = 7,
X = 4 ;
C = 8,
X = 4.5 ;
C = 9,
X = 5 ;
C = 10,
X = 5.5.

Moreover, it's even more efficient than the original method!

2
  • 4
    On a cursory reading (= estimating the number of characters of your answer), your elaboration lacks rigor - see this how to do it
    – false
    Jun 9 '17 at 16:25
  • @lambda.xy.x : Thank you for you help
    – azert123
    Jun 11 '17 at 14:42
3

Think about your rules...

average(1, 1).

The average of 1 is 1.

That sounds correct. I'm going to skip to your 3rd rule, which is also quite specific, but just verbose:

average(N,X) :- K is N-1 ,K=:=1 , average(K,S1) , X is +(S1,N).

The average of 1 to N is X if K is N-1, K is 1, the average of K numbers is S1, and X is S1+N.

This could be simplified a great deal since N is necessarily 2 in this rule:

average(2, X) :- average(1, S1), X is S1 + 2.

Then further, since we know the one result for average(1, S1):

average(2, X) :- X is 3   % X is 1 + 2

And then even further, just:

average(2, 3).

So you don't need all that logic for your 3rd rule.

Now let's look at the second rule, which is your most general case:

average(N,X) :- K is N-1 ,K>1 , average(K,S1) , X is /(+(S1,N),N).

The average of 1 to N is X if K is N-1, K > 1, the average of 1 to K is S1, and X is (S1 + N)/N.

This is the case where K > 1, or equivalently, N > 2. It's saying I can take the average of 1 to N by first taking the average of 1 to N-1, then just add N and then divide by N to get the average of 1 to N. This isn't mathematically valid. Let's take a simple counter example where N is 3:

S1 = average of 1 to 2, = (1+2)/2 = 1.5.

Now if we say the average of 1 to 3 is the average of 1 to 2 added to 3 then divided by 3, we'd get:

S = average of 1 to 3 = (S1 + 3)/3 = (1.5+3)/3 = 4.5/3 = 1.5

However, the correct answer is (1+2+3)/3 which is 6/3 or just 2.

What would the correct formula be? Well, S1 being the average of 1 to N-1 would be sum of 1 to N-1 / (N-1). If I want to go from that to S, the sum of 1 to N / N, which is the average of 1 to N, I would need to multiply S1 by N-1, then add in N, then divide by N. In other words, your 2nd rule should be:

average(N,X) :- K is N-1, K > 1 , average(K, S1), X is (S1*(N-1)+N)/N.

Going back to our trivial example for 1 to 3, we found the average of 1 to 2 was 1.5. If we multiply that back by 2, then add 3, then divide by 3, we get: ((1.5*2)+3)/3 = (3+3)/3 = 6/3 = 2, which is the correct answer.

In summary, your rules become:

average(1, 1).
average(2, 3).
average(N, X) :- K is N-1, K > 1 , average(K, S1), X is (S1*(N-1)+N)/N.

But really you don't need the second rule. The 3rd rule and the base case take care of it for you if we adjust the condition in the 3rd rule for K (or really just make it a rule for N, which is clearer). So just:

average(1, 1).
average(N, X) :- N > 1, K is N-1, average(K, S1), X is (S1*(N-1)+N)/N.

As an aside, I assume this is just an exercise in recursion in Prolog since there is already a simple formula for the sum of numbers from 1 to N (N*(N+1)/2), and therefore for the average, which would be: (N+1)/2.

3
  • I almost contributed this answer but yours is better and nobody has to get in trouble. :) Jun 9 '17 at 6:11
  • 2
    Argl, I should have read your answer in more carefully... well, now we have a solution for the (n+1)/2 version too. Jun 9 '17 at 9:25
  • @lurker : this is so much useful , thank you for your help
    – azert123
    Jun 11 '17 at 14:42
2

just to hint how a good library(aggregate) can help:

?- aggregate((sum(N),count),member(N,[4,5,6]),(S,C)),Ave is S/C.
S = 15,
C = 3,
Ave = 5.
2
  • i didnt want to use any library , thank you anyway :) .
    – azert123
    Jun 11 '17 at 14:43
  • sure... I just left this post in case someone experienced would arrive on the question and didn't know about 'real world' libraries availability
    – CapelliC
    Jun 11 '17 at 14:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.