We can create savepoints in Oracle and then we can rollback to a specific savepoint by calling the ROLLBACK TO SAVEPOINT <savepoint_name>.

UPDATE employees 
    SET salary = 7000 
    WHERE last_name = 'Banda';
SAVEPOINT banda_sal;

UPDATE employees 
    SET salary = 12000 
    WHERE last_name = 'Greene';
SAVEPOINT greene_sal;

SELECT SUM(salary) FROM employees;

ROLLBACK; --> the rollback without the savepoint

UPDATE employees 
    SET salary = 11000 
    WHERE last_name = 'Greene';

COMMIT;  

Can someone explain how the above code works?

At once this can be seen as a silly question. But there can be scenarios where it is difficult to identify where the ROLLBACK statement are executed in a complex PL SQL program (if you have to do only a modification to the existing code).

  • 4
    From the manual "If you omit the savepoint clause, then the ROLLBACK statement rolls back the entire transaction" – a_horse_with_no_name Jun 9 '17 at 9:26
  • 1
    The ROLLBACK undoes everything until the last COMMIT. – Tenzin Jun 9 '17 at 10:00
  • You can always trace your session and find the rollback points (XCTEND rlbk=1) but this can get complex if you are making calls to uncommitted procs/packages within your plsql blocks. – sandman Jun 9 '17 at 10:24
  • 1
    @Tenzin, provided you did only DML's. Each DDL makes an automatic COMMIT. – Wernfried Domscheit Jun 9 '17 at 10:25
  • @WernfriedDomscheit - What Tenzin said is 100% correct, but perhaps too terse. What you added is valuable, but it does not contradict what Tenzin said. An automatic COMMIT is, obviously, a COMMIT. – mathguy Jun 9 '17 at 11:01
up vote 2 down vote accepted

if you don't use "savepoint to" rollback will rolls back to enter point(in your example it is first update,because your transaction is starting from first update), after rollback if you are using some DML(in your example third update) finally "commit" will be commit only last part of your transaction (after last rollback part, third update)

--- start transactions

UPDATE employees 
    SET salary = 7000 
    WHERE last_name = 'Banda';
SAVEPOINT banda_sal;

UPDATE employees 
    SET salary = 12000 
    WHERE last_name = 'Greene';
SAVEPOINT greene_sal;

SELECT SUM(salary) FROM employees;

ROLLBACK; -- roolback to first DML("start transactions" part,because there  is no any savepoint to)

UPDATE employees 
    SET salary = 11000 
    WHERE last_name = 'Greene';

COMMIT;  -- commit only last update

Regarding this comment:

But there can be scenarios where it is difficult to identify where the ROLLBACK statement are executed in a complex PL SQL program (if you have to do only a modification to the existing code).

If you are running an Oracle Database 12c Release 2 instance (available now for download from OTN, Github and Docker, or multiple cloud services), you can take advantage of PL/Scope to find all the places in your code where commits and rollbacks are executed (PL/Scope was first added in 11.1, but analysis of SQL statements was added in 12.2):

You must first enable gathering of scope data:

ALTER SESSION SET plscope_settings='identifiers:all, statements:all'

Then when you compile program units, information is put into ALL_IDENTIFIERS (PL/SQL statements) and ALL_STATEMENTS (SQL statements, new to 12.2).

Once you have done that, the following queries will locate all commits and rollbacks:

SELECT st.owner,
       st.object_name,
       st.object_type,
       st.line,
       src.text
  FROM all_statements st, all_source src
 WHERE     st.TYPE = 'COMMIT'
       AND st.object_name = src.name
       AND st.owner = src.owner
       AND st.line = src.line
ORDER BY st.owner,
         st.object_name,
         st.object_type   
/

SELECT st.owner,
       st.object_name,
       st.object_type,
       st.line,
       src.text
  FROM all_statements st, all_source src
 WHERE     st.TYPE = 'ROLLBACK'
       AND st.object_name = src.name
       AND st.owner = src.owner
       AND st.line = src.line
ORDER BY st.owner,
         st.object_name,
         st.object_type    
/

You can find lots more information about and examples for PL/Scope here.

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