63

I don't understand the concept of postfix and prefix increment or decrement. Can anyone give a better explanation?

10 Answers 10

101

All four answers so far are incorrect, in that they assert a specific order of events.

Believing that "urban legend" has led many a novice (and professional) astray, to wit, the endless stream of questions about Undefined Behavior in expressions.

So.

For the built-in C++ prefix operator,

++x

increments x and produces as expression result x as an lvalue, while

x++

increments x and produces as expression result the original value of x.

In particular, for x++ there is no no time ordering implied for the increment and production of original value of x. The compiler is free to emit machine code that produces the original value of x, e.g. it might be present in some register, and that delays the increment until the end of the expression (next sequence point).

Folks who incorrectly believe the increment must come first, and they are many, often conclude from that certain expressions must have well defined effect, when they actually have Undefined Behavior.

  • 3
    whats lvalue? and code example can help a little better. – Saad Masood Dec 15 '10 at 1:13
  • 4
    @Sa'me Smd: "lvalue" is essentially a reference to an object that has storage. it's terminology stemming from early C, where an assignment needed an lvalue on the left side. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 15 '10 at 1:35
  • 2
    You're right about the mechanics but I think you're wrong to say others and incorrect on the conceptual level. The mechanics are just practicalities of trying to implement the concept. 'Post' means after - conceptually, the increment is done afterwards. The whole concept of 'sequence' as in 'sequence point' implies an order, and the UB comes from misunderstanding how sequence points work, not from 'misunderstanding' the meaning of 'pre' and 'post'. – sje397 Dec 15 '10 at 1:48
  • 2
    So what would an expression like (i++ > 0) && someProperty(myArray[i]) do? Like if i=5, would it be calling someProperty with myArray[5] or myArray[6]? – AJMansfield Nov 12 '12 at 1:39
  • 3
    @AJMansfield: In C++03 terms the built-in && introduces a sequence point (C++03 §1.9/18). In C++11 terms the left hand operand expression of the built-in && is sequenced before the right hand operand expression (C++11 §5.14/2). This means that if the call is made, it's made with i value 6. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 12 '12 at 4:09
26
int i, x;

i = 2;
x = ++i;
// now i = 3, x = 3

i = 2;
x = i++; 
// now i = 3, x = 2

'Post' means after - that is, the increment is done after the variable is read. 'Pre' means before - so the variable value is incremented first, then used in the expression.

  • "the increment is done after the variable is read". I used to think I understand post- and prefix increment, but now you got me confused! – wilhelmtell Dec 15 '10 at 0:52
  • Why is that confusing? We're talking about the concept of 'pre' and 'post' increment. Those prefixes do mean before and after. – sje397 Dec 15 '10 at 1:48
  • 3
    The "pre" and "post" in "preincrement" and "postincrement" refer to the position of the operator with respect to the operand. They do not imply any temporal ordering between when the increment occurs with respect to when the variable is read. – James McNellis Dec 20 '10 at 15:16
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    @James: I understand your point - but to illustrate, imagine how confusing it would be if the function of the operators was reversed. I know that technically, there is no implication of temporal ordering, but there is definitely a conceptual mapping of the post increment to the idea of 'incrementing after use'. – sje397 Dec 20 '10 at 23:47
16

No one has answered the question: Why is this concept confusing?

As an undergrad Computer Science major it took me awhile to understand this because of the way I read the code.

The following is not correct!


x = y++

X is equal to y post increment. Which would logically seem to mean X is equal to the value of Y after the increment operation is done. Post meaning after.

or

x = ++y
X is equal to y pre-increment. Which would logically seem to mean X is equal to the value of Y before the increment operation is done. Pre meaning before.


The way it works is actually the opposite. This concept is confusing because the language is misleading. In this case we cannot use the words to define the behavior.
x=++y is actually read as X is equal to the value of Y after the increment.
x=y++ is actually read as X is equal to the value of Y before the increment.

The words pre and post are backwards with respect to semantics of English. They only mean where the ++ is in relation Y. Nothing more.

Personally, if I had the choice I would switch the meanings of ++y and y++. This is just an example of a idiom that I had to learn.

If there is a method to this madness I'd like to know in simple terms.

Thanks for reading.

  • 11
    "If there is a method to this madness I'd like to know in simple terms." - I think of it as this: PRE increment (y=++x): increment x first THEN assign to y. And for POST increment (y=x++): Assign to y THEN increment x. So think of pre & post as "when does x get incremented" rather than "what version of x does y get". That's my "method to the madness" and it makes perfect sense, IMO ;-) – Graza Apr 23 '15 at 5:56
  • "If there is a method to this madness I'd like to know in simple terms." well, of course there is. preincrement means 'the operator comes pre a.k.a. before the operand, so the increment comes before the operand is returned to the caller, so the value they get includes the increment.' postincrement means 'the operator comes post a.k.a. after the operand, so the increment comes after (a copy of) the operand is returned to the caller, so the value they get does not include the increment.' – underscore_d Sep 4 '16 at 13:14
13

The difference between the postfix increment, x++, and the prefix increment, ++x, is precisely in how the two operators evaluate their operands. The postfix increment conceptually copies the operand in memory, increments the original operand and finally yields the value of the copy. I think this is best illustrated by implementing the operator in code:

int operator ++ (int& n)  // postfix increment
{
    int tmp = n;
    n = n + 1;
    return tmp;
}

The above code will not compile because you can't re-define operators for primitive types. The compiler also can't tell here we're defining a postfix operator rather than prefix, but let's pretend this is correct and valid C++. You can see that the postfix operator indeed acts on its operand, but it returns the old value prior to the increment, so the result of the expression x++ is the value prior to the increment. x, however, is incremented.

The prefix increment increments its operand as well, but it yields the value of the operand after the increment:

int& operator ++ (int& n)
{
    n = n + 1;
    return n;
}

This means that the expression ++x evaluates to the value of x after the increment.

It's easy to think that the expression ++x is therefore equivalent to the assignmnet (x=x+1). This is not precisely so, however, because an increment is an operation that can mean different things in different contexts. In the case of a simple primitive integer, indeed ++x is substitutable for (x=x+1). But in the case of a class-type, such as an iterator of a linked list, a prefix increment of the iterator most definitely does not mean "adding one to the object".

6

It's pretty simple. Both will increment the value of a variable. The following two lines are equal:

x++;
++x;

The difference is if you are using the value of a variable being incremented:

x = y++;
x = ++y;

Here, both lines increment the value of y by one. However, the first one assigns the value of y before the increment to x, and the second one assigns the value of y after the increment to x.

So there's only a difference when the increment is also being used as an expression. The post-increment increments after returning the value. The pre-increment increments before.

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    The two lines are not equal at all. -1 – wilhelmtell Dec 15 '10 at 0:51
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    wilhemtell: Thanks for adding absolutely nothing to the discussion. Good job. – Jonathan Wood Dec 15 '10 at 0:55
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    @JonathanWood what's the type of x? There you have it. The two lines are not equal. Do I add anything to the discussion now? – wilhelmtell Dec 15 '10 at 1:22
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    @JamesMcNellis no, the first two statements have the same effect unless x is of a class-type period. – wilhelmtell Dec 15 '10 at 1:35
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    @wilhelmtell: If the overloads are consistent (which they should be), then the effect of the statements x++; and ++x; is the same. Yes, you call different functions, but they should do the same thing. That's what I was trying to get at. – James McNellis Dec 15 '10 at 1:47
4
int i = 1;
int j = 1;

int k = i++; // post increment
int l = ++j; // pre increment

std::cout << k; // prints 1
std::cout << l; // prints 2

Post increment implies the value i is incremented after it has been assigned to k. However, pre increment implies the value j is incremented before it is assigned to l.

The same applies for decrement.

  • Thumbs up for explaining with an example – Rajesh Jun 8 '17 at 4:17
0

Since we now have inline javascript snippets I might as well add an interactive example of pre and pos increment. It's not C++ but the concept stays the same.

let A = 1;
let B = 1;

console.log('A++ === 2', A++ === 2);
console.log('++B === 2', ++B === 2);

-1

From the C99 standard (C++ should be the same, barring strange overloading)

6.5.2.4 Postfix increment and decrement operators

Constraints

1 The operand of the postfix increment or decrement operator shall have qualified or unqualified real or pointer type and shall be a modifiable lvalue.

Semantics

2 The result of the postfix ++ operator is the value of the operand. After the result is obtained, the value of the operand is incremented. (That is, the value 1 of the appropriate type is added to it.) See the discussions of additive operators and compound assignment for information on constraints, types, and conversions and the effects of operations on pointers. The side effect of updating the stored value of the operand shall occur between the previous and the next sequence point.

3 The postfix -- operator is analogous to the postfix ++ operator, except that the value of the operand is decremented (that is, the value 1 of the appropriate type is subtracted from it).

6.5.3.1 Prefix increment and decrement operators

Constraints

1 The operand of the prefix increment or decrement operator shall have qualified or unqualified real or pointer type and shall be a modifiable lvalue.

Semantics

2 The value of the operand of the prefix ++ operator is incremented. The result is the new value of the operand after incrementation. The expression ++E is equivalent to (E+=1). See the discussions of additive operators and compound assignment for information on constraints, types, side effects, and conversions and the effects of operations on pointers.

3 The prefix -- operator is analogous to the prefix ++ operator, except that the value of the operand is decremented.

  • 9
    Posting a large block of text from the ISO Standard without any comment or explanation is not really helpful, especially when the text is not entirely self-contained (from this text, what is a sequence point? what is an lvalue? how can this lvalue be qualified or unqualified? where are "the discussions of additive operators and compound assignment"?). Also, assuming that C++ is the same is generally A Bad Idea. There are many small but important differences between the two languages, even in supposedly simple things like operator behavior. – James McNellis Dec 15 '10 at 1:29
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    I am sorry but posting a part of the standard from a different language isn't particular helpful. Most of the time the increment operators in c++ are used on class types, which makes this more confusing than helpful. – daramarak Feb 27 '14 at 8:19
-3

The pre increment is before increment value ++ e.g.:

(++v) or 1 + v

The post increment is after increment the value ++ e.g.:

(rmv++) or rmv + 1

Program:

int rmv = 10, vivek = 10;
cout << "rmv++ = " << rmv++ << endl; // the value is 10
cout << "++vivek = " << ++vivek; // the value is 11
  • first increment the value is pre increment and next step increment the value is post increment – R.M.VIVEK ARNI Oct 14 '14 at 10:13
  • Please format your code. – GingerPlusPlus Oct 14 '14 at 13:32
-6

You should also be aware that the behaviour of postincrement/decrement operators is different in C/C++ and Java.

Given

  int a=1;

in C/C++ the expression

 a++ + a++ + a++

evaluates to 3, while in Java it evaluates to 6. Guess why...

This example is even more confusing:

cout << a++ + a++ + a++ << "<->" << a++ + a++ ;

prints 9<->2 !! This is because the above expression is equivalent to:

operator<<( 
  operator<<( 
    operator<<( cout, a++ + a++ ), 
    "<->"
  ), 
  a++ + a++ + a++ 
)
  • 1
    This is due probably to what the C99 standard says: "The side effect of updating the stored value of the operand shall occur between the previous and the next sequence point." – Pedro J. Ponce de León May 29 '13 at 10:13
  • I tried this with C and C++ compilers. It also evaluates to 6. With what compiler did you get 3? – Foo Bar Mar 19 '16 at 21:51
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    This is undefined behavior when using the pre/post increment operators twice in one expression. – Galik Jun 23 '16 at 7:05
  • 2
    The statement "in C/C++ the expression a++ + a++ + a++ evaluates to 3" is simply wrong. As @Galik noted, it results in undefined behavior. – Happy Green Kid Naps Sep 19 '16 at 15:46

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