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I have been comparing various ways to quickly read relatively large text documents in Powershell. These files range from 50kb - 200mb. And I need to quickly parse them for specific lines and/or specific strings.

The three common tools to read files (that I am aware of, and without building a C# library of my own) are: System.IO.StreamReader, System.IO.File, and the Powershell Cmdlet Get-Content.

So I wrote a quick little compare script:

$file = Get-Childitem -path "MyLogFile.txt" #This is a 100mb txt file

$t1 = Measure-Command{
    $reader = New-Object System.IO.StreamReader($file)
    $content = $reader.ReadToEnd()
    $reader.Close()
}
Write-host "StreamReader time: " + $t1

$t2 = Measure-Command{
    Get-Content $file 
}
Write-host "Get-Content time: " + $t2

$t3 = Measure-Command {
    $reader = [System.IO.File]::OpenText($file)
    $content = $reader.ReadToEnd()
    $reader.Close()
}
Write-Host "System.IO.File reader time: " + $t3

Which produces (with slight variation of course) the following output:

StreamReader time:  + 00:00:00.5493247
Get-Content time:  + 00:00:07.8424864
System.IO.File reader time:  + 00:00:00.7988032

So it would seem that [System.IO.StreamReader] is the fastest way to "read" a file.

My question is:

Assuming that

[System.IO.File]::OpenText($file)
$content = $reader.ReadToEnd()

Is equivalent (because they both open file streams) to:

$reader = New-Object System.IO.StreamReader($file)
$content = $reader.ReadToEnd()

Then what makes one slightly faster than the other? Running this about 10 times, it seems like [System.IO.StreamReader] is always ~0.2s faster.

Sources

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    File.OpenText likely does a few checks on the path that you provide before instantiating an instance of StreamReader. – Cobster Jun 9 '17 at 16:43
  • @Cobster Interesting thought! I decided to test it... using a file aprox. 80kb large, and IO.File bested StreamReader by .002 seconds! So now I'm really curious as to what these two methods are doing differently. – Christopher Jun 9 '17 at 17:09
  • if you run it several times you can see additional differences, sometimes StreamReader is faster, sometimes it's slower, I think it has to do with spindles and file seek times getting in the way. – Micky Balladelli Jun 9 '17 at 17:17
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    @Christopher - You can always use ildasm or another tool to dissemble the System.dll and see actually differences in the code that executes. – Cobster Jun 9 '17 at 20:48
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    BTW, currently your measurements are invalid due to garbage-collection that runs after the first block completes. If you reverse the order of blocks OpenText will be "faster". You need to restart the host (powershell terminal or ISE), or measure at least 10 runs then average the result. – wOxxOm Jun 9 '17 at 22:56

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