What is the purpose of the Docker build context? I understand, from the documentation, that it's the "entry" point from which the entire contents will be sent to the docker daemon. But what's the point of sending the entire contents of the current directory, assuming the default use case provided in examples, when we must also explicitly include a COPY or ADD directive in the Dockerfile to ACTUALLY include the contents of the current directory in the generated image? If the context is sent to the daemon to be included in the image, then why are we required to make this extra step. Why doesn't the compressed upload/send/copy task include the contents of the specified directory by default?

e.g. Given this directory structure

-rw-r--r--  1 me me    7 Jun  8 18:52 .dockerignore
-rw-r--r--  1 me me 1.1K Jun  9 12:42 Dockerfile
drwxr-xr-x 13 me me 4.0K Jun  8 19:43 myproject

When I run this command docker build -t user/myproject:2.3 .

Then I would expect to see an myproject directory somewhere in the generated image. But, I MUST include

 ADD myproject /

for that to be the case.

If the build process compresses the current directory contents and sends it to the daemon, where does it go? Why doesn't it make that content available for use in the image?

up vote 19 down vote accepted

TL;DR: "because the client and daemon may not even run on the same machine"

The docker command is the docker client of the dockerd that is the service that can run directly in your PC (linux) or under a Linux VM under OSX or Windows.

Q: What is the purpose of the Docker build context?

From here:

Would probably be good to also mention that this has to happen this way because the client and daemon may not even run on the same machine, so without this "context" the daemon machine wouldn't have any other way to get files for ADD or otherwise


Q: If the build process compresses the current directory contents and sends it to the daemon, where does it go?

The docker daemon receives the compressed directory and process it on the fly; does not matter where it is stored in that moment.

Q: Why doesn't it make that content available for use in the image?

Think this: How can docker know where do you want to put each file/directory in the target image? With COPY/ADD directives you can control where put each one. The case that you've mentioned is only a trivial example where you have only directory and only target.

  • 4
    "because the client and daemon may not even run on the same machine" Seems like a poor reason to do the transfer even when it's not the case, especially since AIUI, they're on the same machine most of the time. Docker could also just only send the files as needed by COPY commands. – Alec Oct 25 '17 at 22:14
  • Another question is, if I use ADD command to a 1GB file outside of current directory, will it make the final image bigger by 1GB? Or perhaps, it won't (because the build context doesn't have the file)? – sancho21 Apr 20 at 6:13
  • Another question also: If I'm sure I have docker (client) and dockerd on the same machine, is it okay to ADD files from the outside of context directory and then later publish it, then have someone else use the image created? – sancho21 Apr 20 at 6:19
  • 1
    Why can't the docker build command first pass through the Dockerfile and determine what stuff gets added and add that (and only that) to the context? – River Tam Nov 6 at 18:05

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