267

I wonder if there is a better way to disable console errors inside a specific Jest test (i.e. restore the original console before/after each test).

Here is my current approach:

describe("Some description", () => {
  let consoleSpy;

  beforeEach(() => {
    if (typeof consoleSpy === "function") {
      consoleSpy.mockRestore();
    }
  });

  test("Some test that should not output errors to jest console", () => {
    expect.assertions(2);

    consoleSpy = jest.spyOn(console, "error").mockImplementation();
 
    // some function that uses console error
    expect(someFunction).toBe("X");
    expect(consoleSpy).toHaveBeenCalled();
  });

  test("Test that has console available", () => {
    // shows up during jest watch test, just as intended
    console.error("test");
  });
});

Is there a cleaner way of accomplishing the same thing? I would like to avoid spyOn, but mockRestore only seems to work with it.

3
  • I accidentally ended up hiding a real error doing this. Ideally, first thing you should try to do is diagnose a warning or error. If it's truly benign, there are plenty of answers below to help in hiding it. Sep 6, 2021 at 3:22
  • @DevinRhode, it's decent advice But there are cases where console output is expected as part of a test, e.g. testing the error-handling code in a function. And sometimes you may want to call 3rd-party code that console logs, rather than mocking it out. Jan 8, 2022 at 23:02
  • A justified approach, imho. If you are using some external library in a test suite, and it is full of warnings and errors itself, and you can't just clean up all that mess. I utilize a version of your approach, doign the mock in beforeAll and restoring in afterAll Apr 12 at 0:25

15 Answers 15

361

For particular spec file, Andreas's is good enough. Below setup will suppress console.log statements for all test suites,

jest --silent

(or)

To customize warn, info and debug you can use below setup

tests/setup.js or jest-preload.js configured in setupFilesAfterEnv

global.console = {
  ...console,
  // uncomment to ignore a specific log level
  log: jest.fn(),
  debug: jest.fn(),
  info: jest.fn(),
  // warn: jest.fn(),
  // error: jest.fn(),
};

jest.config.js

module.exports = {
    verbose: true,
    setupFilesAfterEnv: ["<rootDir>/__tests__/setup.js"],
};
4
  • 2
    Hi! setupTestFrameworkScriptFile is deprecated in favor of setupFilesAfterEnv.
    – elhoucine
    Jan 25, 2019 at 17:02
  • 3
    Mocking global.console is indeed a simple way to go, and can be done through any configured setupFilesAfterEnv . Beware to mock all native methods of the console object or you may encounter other unexpected errors. Aug 6, 2019 at 14:17
  • Note that if you then want to check on the mock (or clear it) you will need to refer to it as console.log, e.g., expect(console.log).toBeCalledTimes(1). Jun 22, 2021 at 13:59
  • 2
    You can also add the "silent": true option to the jest.config.js file
    – Finesse
    Nov 29, 2021 at 7:53
196

If you want to do it just for a specific test:

beforeEach(() => {
  jest.spyOn(console, 'warn').mockImplementation(() => {});
});

To make TS happy, you can use:

beforeEach(() => {
  jest.spyOn(console, 'error').mockImplementation(jest.fn());
});
10
  • 8
    It doesn't work in my tests, I still have some console.warn during test. Tested multiple times, it's not bulletproof Mar 15, 2021 at 12:06
  • 6
    I don't know why this answer has so many upvotes. It's a great way to disable console functionality before each test (as the name beforeEach would imply), but it doesn't answer the OP's question, which is "how to disable console errors inside a specific Jest test". Sep 15, 2021 at 18:25
  • 8
    @fenix.shadow it's very easily adaptable to doing it inside a single test. Anything that can be done within a beforeEach can be done within an it. As for people saying it doesn't work... it does for me. You may want to also catch the error thrown by Vue Test Utils's default error handler.
    – Ariane
    Oct 7, 2021 at 15:46
  • 4
    The missing part of adapting it to be used in a single test is calling consoleSpy.mockRestore() afterward. The code given in this solution will leave console logging disabled for all tests in the JS file that are executed afterward which can hide errors. The OP's original code sample fixes this. Jan 8, 2022 at 23:07
  • 1
    Spies are isolated per test
    – Constantin
    Jan 10, 2022 at 16:16
86

As every test file runs in its own thread there is no need to restore it if you want to disable it for all test in one file. For the same reason you can also just write

console.log = jest.fn()
expect(console.log).toHaveBeenCalled();
2
  • 2
    Thank you for the info on that matter. It does make sense :) I was looking for a way to make it that way only inside a specific test without having to restore it (I initially thought that was the behaviour by default), but I guess beforeEach does the trick.
    – Apidcloud
    Jun 12, 2017 at 11:01
  • 1
    But the next tests in the same file will still have it mocked, right? Depending on the situation, that may not be ideal.
    – Ariane
    Oct 7, 2021 at 15:47
30

I found that the answer above re: suppressing console.log across all test suites threw errors when any other console methods (e.g. warn, error) were called since it was replacing the entire global console object.

This somewhat similar approach worked for me with Jest 22+:

package.json

"jest": {
  "setupFiles": [...],
  "setupTestFrameworkScriptFile": "<rootDir>/jest/setup.js",
  ...
}

jest/setup.js

jest.spyOn(global.console, 'log').mockImplementation(() => jest.fn());

Using this method, only console.log is mocked and other console methods are unaffected.

0
13

To me a more clear/clean way (reader needs little knowledge of the jest API to understand what is happening), is to just manually do what mockRestore does:

// at start of test you want to suppress
const consoleLog = console.log;
console.log = jest.fn();

// at end of test
console.log = consoleLog;
4
  • 1
    You also need to cover console.info, console.error, console.warn, etc. Oct 24, 2019 at 15:00
  • 1
    @michael-liquori why do you need to restart the console.log? I think after every describe the mocks are cleared
    – Jhonatan
    Jul 9, 2020 at 14:03
  • 2
    @Jhonatan I don't think it does clear after every describe, though I haven't tested this recently to be sure. According to jest docs there is a clearMocks and resetMocks configuration option but they both default to false, and neither of those actually restore the initial implementation even if set to true. And, considering this is a config option that could be changed at some point, I think it is best practice to clean up manually to ensure your tests won't cause problems in the future. Jul 9, 2020 at 20:23
  • Note that if the test fails, the rest of the test will not run so console.log = consoleLog will not be called. Better to beforeEach(() => jest.restoreAllMocks()).
    – Tamlyn
    Jan 27, 2023 at 14:53
10
beforeAll(() => {
    jest.spyOn(console, 'log').mockImplementation(() => {});
    jest.spyOn(console, 'error').mockImplementation(() => {});
    jest.spyOn(console, 'warn').mockImplementation(() => {});
    jest.spyOn(console, 'info').mockImplementation(() => {});
    jest.spyOn(console, 'debug').mockImplementation(() => {});
});
6

Here's all the lines you may want to use. You can put them right in the test:

jest.spyOn(console, 'warn').mockImplementation(() => {});
console.warn("You won't see me!")
expect(console.warn).toHaveBeenCalled();
console.warn.mockRestore();
1
5

If you are using command npm test to run test then change the test script in package.json like below

{
  ....
  "name": "....",
  "version": "0.0.1",
  "private": true,
  "scripts": {
    "android": "react-native run-android",
    "ios": "react-native run-ios",
    "start": "react-native start",
    "test": "jest --silent",         // add --silent to jest in script like this
    "lint": "eslint ."
  },
  ...
}

Or else you can directly run command npx jest --silent to get rid of all logs and errors when testing

4

Weirdly the answers above (except Raja's great answer but I wanted to share the weird way the others fail and how to clear the mock so no one else wastes the time I did) seem to successfully create the mock but don't suppress the logging to the console.

Both

const consoleSpy = jest.spyOn(console, 'warn').mockImplementation(() => {});

and

global console = {
   warn: jest.fn().mockImplementation(() => {});
}

successfully install the mock (I can use expect(console.warn).toBeCalledTimes(1) and it passes) but it still outputs the warning even though the mock implementation seemingly should be replacing the default (this is in a jsdom environment).

Eventually I found a hack to fix the problem and put the following in the file loaded with SetupFiles in your config (note that I found sometimes global.$ didn't work for me when putting jquery into global context so I just set all my globals this way in my setup).

const consoleWarn = jest.spyOn(console, 'warn').mockImplementation(() => {});
const consoleLog = jest.spyOn(console, 'log').mockImplementation(() => {});
const consoleDebug = jest.spyOn(console, 'debug').mockImplementation(() => {});
const consoleError = jest.spyOn(console, 'error').mockImplementation(() => {});


Object.defineProperty(global, 'console', {value: {
                                            warn: consoleWarn,
                                            log: consoleLog,
                                            debug: consoleDebug,
                                            error: consoleError}});

It feels ugly and I then have to put code like the following in each test file since beforeEach isn't defined in the files referenced by SetupFiles (maybe you could put both in SetupFilesAfterEnv but I haven't tried).

beforeEach(() => {
  console.warn.mockClear();
});
2

Since jest.spyOn doesn't work for this (it may have in the past), I resorted to jest.fn with a manual mock restoration as pointed out in Jest docs. This way, you should not miss any logs which are not empirically ignored in a specific test.

const consoleError = console.error

beforeEach(() => {
  console.error = consoleError
})

test('with error', () => {
  console.error = jest.fn()
  console.error('error') // can't see me
})

test('with error and log', () => {
  console.error('error') // now you can
})

1

Kudos to @Raja's top answer. Here is what I am using (I would comment, but can't share a multi-line code block in a comment).

With jest v26, I'm getting this error:

We detected setupFilesAfterEnv in your package.json.

Remove it from Jest configuration, and put the initialization code in src/setupTests.js:
This file will be loaded automatically.

Therefore, I had to remove the setupFilesAfterEnv from my jest config, and add this to src/setupTests.js

// https://stackoverflow.com/questions/44467657/jest-better-way-to-disable-console-inside-unit-tests
const nativeConsoleError = global.console.error

global.console.error = (...args) => {
  if (args.join('').includes('Could not parse CSS stylesheet')) {
    return
  }
  return nativeConsoleError(...args)
}
1

Ways to suppress console (logs, warning, error)

Option-1: Updating configuration in jest.config.js

module.exports = {
  
  silent: true,

  <OTHER_PROPERTIES>
};

Option-2:

scripts": {
    "test": "jest --silent",         
  },

Option-3: In case need to suppress for particular spec

// Your test spec 
beforeAll(() => {
  // Silence console logs and warnings
  jest.spyOn(console, 'log').mockImplementation(() => {});
  jest.spyOn(console, 'warn').mockImplementation(() => {});
  jest.spyOn(console, 'error').mockImplementation(() => {});
});

afterAll(() => {
  console = { ...originalConsoleMethods };
});
0

Here's a simple function that will ignore specific logs that match the supplied regex:

export default function ignoreLogs(
  logType: 'log' | 'info' | 'warn' | 'error',
  match: RegExp
) {
  // eslint-disable-next-line no-console
  const logFn = console[logType];
  jest.spyOn(console, logType).mockImplementation((...args) => {
    if (typeof args[0] === 'string' && args[0].match(match)) {
      return;
    }

    logFn(...args);
  });
}

Usage:

ignoreLogs('warn', /some warning that is logged by an internal library/)
0

The jest-fail-on-console library has an useful feature for this. Just add the following in your Jest config file:

failOnConsole({
  silenceMessage: (errorMessage) => {
    if (/Part of error message I need to ignore/.test(errorMessage)) {
      return true
    }
    return false
  },
})
-1

Another approach is to use process.env.NODE_ENV. This way one can selectively choose what to show (or not) while running tests:

if (process.env.NODE_ENV === 'development') {
  console.log('Show output only while in "development" mode');
} else if (process.env.NODE_ENV === 'test') {
  console.log('Show output only while in "test" mode');
}

or

const logDev = msg => {
  if (process.env.NODE_ENV === 'development') {
    console.log(msg);
  }
}
logDev('Show output only while in "development" mode');

This will require this configuration to be placed on package.json:

"jest": {
  "globals": {
    "NODE_ENV": "test"
  }
}

Note that this approach is not a direct solution to the original question, but gives the expected result as long as one has the possibility to wrap the console.log with the mentioned condition.

4
  • 3
    What the author of the question is how to disable console.log on testing. This solution is not optimal.
    – Erick
    Oct 1, 2019 at 16:12
  • 1
    For copy-pasters out there: replace === with !== according to your needs. I've been using this approach for years and it works flawlessly, but I do make adjustments according to my needs. Oct 7, 2019 at 8:09
  • Doesn't answer the actual question. Oct 24, 2019 at 14:59
  • This is a hacky solution and not customizable. What if disable only for a specific test and not the other one?
    – Jhonatan
    Jul 9, 2020 at 14:05

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