2

I've been reading up on the new async/await and have been playing around with it in Node 8. I've come across some people putting everything within the initial try block, and others having only the await and all the rest is below the try/catch. Is one better than the other? This is one of the functions in my own code in the two styles to show what I mean:

async function findCurrentInstallations() {
    try {
        const results = await installations.find({});

        if (results.length === 0) { throw new Error('No installations registered'); }
        return results;
    } catch (err) {
        throw err;
    }
}

--

async function findCurrentInstallations() {
    let results;

    try {
        results = await installations.find({});
    } catch (err) {
        throw err;
    }

    if (results.length === 0) { throw new Error('No installations registered'); }
    return results;
}
  • 5
    Why would you catch an Error just to immediately throw it again? You're not even logging the error. These both try ... catch blocks are completely pointless. – Thomas Jun 10 '17 at 12:58
  • @Thomas Because I'm still learning this and am not 100% sure of what I'm doing yet? A response essentially saying "You idiot, what the hell did you do this for?" is not helpful. – VirtualWolf Jun 11 '17 at 0:44
  • 1
    No, what I'm saying is "These try...catch blocks are pointless. There's no reason to do this at all. They add NO value to your code, not even as little as logging the error before re-throwing it". Neither did I say, nor mean "You idiot"; sorry if that came across like that. Ain't "why would you do that?" a valid question anymore? Maybe even more a question to think about, a hint to rethink your action/code, than a question that expects an actual answer. – Thomas Jun 11 '17 at 9:06
  • No worries, damn this text-only medium making tone hard to determine! Thanks for the clarification. :) – VirtualWolf Jun 11 '17 at 11:05
  • async/await is part of ES2017, not ES7! – Felix Kling Jun 11 '17 at 18:13
2

There's no need for the try and catch at all in the example you provide, It's the default behavior of async functions.

Your two code fragments differ in that the throw new Error(... in the first case will be handled by the catch clause. But since the catch clause is for all practical purposes a no-op, a pass-through, it doesn't really matter.

I would write this as:

async function findCurrentInstallations() {
    const results = await installations.find({});
    if (results.length === 0) { throw new Error('No installations registered'); }
    return results;
}
  • Interesting, thanks! I've seen a lot of examples that do use try/catch (which is why I thought it necessary)... what situations would you be needing them in, then? – VirtualWolf Jun 10 '17 at 13:00
  • to show that in action - jsfiddle.net/y0Lxynh9 (a slight modification just to be able to show the point) – Jaromanda X Jun 10 '17 at 13:02
  • 3
    what situations when you want to do something specific with the error, such as handle it yourself, whether you then decide to re-throw or not, rather than just letting it turn into a rejection on the promise returned by the async function as normally happens. – user663031 Jun 10 '17 at 13:02
  • Ahhhh! Ok, that makes a lot more sense. Thanks a lot. :) – VirtualWolf Jun 10 '17 at 13:04
  • I believe this kind of code behaviour is wrong. You don't know for which reason installations.find throws. That js code could even put down the app, since results could be undefined and accessing the length property on it would throw a giant error. – Giacomo Cerquone Sep 29 '18 at 23:27
1

wrapping just the await, will only catch errors fired by the await failing, wrapping the whole thing will fail if any line in the code fails, it depends on what you want to catch.

Notice that you are just throwing in the examples, which is useless because the application will throw anyways when it fails.

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