One really cool thing about flexbox is that, if there is room, the flex items' margins are included in the width of the flex container, even if I tell it to take up the whole space. For example, if I have an 100px-wide flex container, and give it a single child that takes up its whole width, then give that child 10px margins on both sides, the child actually becomes 80px wide, as the container allows the child to be completely encapsulated, including the margins. This ignores concerns about overflow, which can be worked around quite easily (min-width: 0; usually handles this).

flex-container {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  display: flex;
  background-color: dodgerblue;
}

flex-item {
  display: block;
  background-color: darkgray;
  margin-left: 10px;
  margin-right: 10px;
  width: 100%;
  height: 20px;
  margin-top: 20px;
}
<flex-container>
  <flex-item>
  </flex-item>
</flex-container>

However, this trick does not seem to extend to the cross-axis (height normally, width with flex-direction: column). If I now give my flex item 10px margins on the top and bottom, instead of the left & right, and give it the whole height instead of the whole width like before, it starts to extend past the bottom edge of the container. Why is that?

flex-container {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  display: flex;
  background-color: dodgerblue;
}

flex-item {
  display: block;
  background-color: darkgray;
  margin-top: 10px;
  margin-bottom: 10px;
  height: 100%;
  width: 20px;
  margin-left: 20px;
}
<flex-container>
  <flex-item>
  </flex-item>
</flex-container>

I have seen this behavior on Google Chrome as well as Firefox. It is probably also he case on Internet Explorer/Edge, but I have not had the ability to test.

Why does the flex item stay inside margins on the main axis, but not on the cross axis?

  • red vs. green is hard to look at for me – ryanve Jun 10 '17 at 19:12
  • 2
    Sorry, I'm not much of a designer. How is green/orange? – trysis Jun 10 '17 at 19:30
  • 1
    Better! Thx for updating : ) Some useful color tools are listed on github.com/ryanve/a11y#accessible-colors such as leaverou.github.io/contrast-ratio where you can aim for 4.5+ contrast ratio – ryanve Jun 10 '17 at 20:47
  • The lea verou one looks like it is for background & text color. Is it for 2 background colors, as well? – trysis Jun 10 '17 at 23:24
  • 1
    Nice—happy devsigning and coding then : ) – ryanve Jun 12 '17 at 1:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The reason is that in the direction flex is set, and since flex-grow's default is 0, it is not allowed to grow, but it is allowed to shrink, (flex-shrink default is 1), so it does.

Here is the same test using column direction, where you will get the reverse behavior.

Your first sample, but with column direction

flex-container {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  background-color: red;
}

flex-item {
  display: block;
  background-color: green;
  margin-left: 10px;
  margin-right: 10px;
  width: 100%;
  height: 20px;
  margin-top: 20px;
}
<flex-container>
  <flex-item>
  </flex-item>
</flex-container>


Your second sample, but with column direction

flex-container {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  background-color: red;
}
flex-item {
  display: block;
  background-color: green;
  margin-top: 10px;
  margin-bottom: 10px;
  height: 100%;
  width: 20px;
  margin-left: 20px;
}
<flex-container>
  <flex-item>
  </flex-item>
</flex-container>


Updated based on a comment.

If you want a similar behavior, where the flex item shrinks and doesn't overflow its parent, simply remove the given width/height

Sample for row direction

flex-container {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  display: flex;
  background-color: green;
}

flex-item {
  display: block;
  background-color: orange;
  margin-top: 10px;
  margin-bottom: 10px;
  width: 20px;
  margin-left: 20px;
}
<flex-container>
  <flex-item>
  </flex-item>
</flex-container>

Sample for column direction

flex-container {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  background-color: green;
}

flex-item {
  display: block;
  background-color: orange;
  margin-left: 10px;
  margin-right: 10px;
  height: 20px;
  margin-top: 20px;
}
<flex-container>
  <flex-item>
  </flex-item>
</flex-container>

  • 1
    @trysis Since margin's always adds to a given width or height, you need to do width: calc(100% - 20px);, resp. height: calc(100% - 20px); .... or you simply remove the set width/height ... and I can't say exactly how this behave cross browser, you need to check which one works, either should work though – LGSon Jun 10 '17 at 19:24
  • 1
    @trysis Then I recommend you skip margin's and use padding's to create the gutter between your grid items. May I also ask you to accept the answer that solve your original question? ... And if you have additional question, feel free to post yet another question with extended requirements, as I'm sure we can help you more, one question at a time :) – LGSon Jun 10 '17 at 20:05
  • 1
    @trysis Ask as many questions you need, just post them one-by-one :) – LGSon Jun 10 '17 at 20:29
  • 1
    Well, that was meant to be part of this question. I will think about asking another question, just need to figure out how to put it. Thank you for the encouragement. – trysis Jun 10 '17 at 20:31
  • 1
    After further reflection (and an entire unreleased question) your answer is enough for me for pretty much all flex-y situations I find myself in. It also clarifies what was actually going on, which was perhaps more important. If I find or remember a specific situation where it is not enough, I will ask another question. Thank you again. – trysis Jun 11 '17 at 1:09

An initial setting of a flex container is flex-shrink: 1.

This means that flex items will shrink when necessary to avoid overflowing the container.

The flex-shrink property (along with flex-grow, flex-basis and flex) works only on the main axis. That's why you see a difference in your width vs. height examples.

When you add top and bottom margins to a flex item in a row-direction container, the flex-shrink: 1 feature does not apply (because you're now in the cross axis), so the item will not shrink to accommodate the added margins.

If you disable flex-shrink, your flex item with horizontal margins will overflow the container:

flex-container {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  display: flex;
  background-color: red;
}

flex-item {
  flex-shrink: 0; /* new */
  margin-left: 10px;
  margin-right: 10px;
  width: 100%;
  height: 20px;
  margin-top: 20px;
  background-color: green;
}
<flex-container>
  <flex-item></flex-item>
</flex-container>

It will respect the margins when you define the flexbox as a column and remove the width: 100% for the child.

flex-container {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  display: flex;
  background-color: red;
}

flex-item {
  display: block;
  background-color: green;
  margin-left: 10px;
  margin-right: 10px;
  width: 100%;
  margin-top: 20px;
  margin-bottom: 20px;
}
<flex-container>
  <flex-item>
  </flex-item>
</flex-container>

  • Yes, but I want it to include the margin in the cross direction. Changing to flex-flow: column makes the height the main axis. – trysis Jun 10 '17 at 15:27
  • Code adjusted. Only height: 100% removed. – Gerard Jun 10 '17 at 15:33
  • I clarified the intent of my question. I want to know why width: 100% on the child excludes the margins, but height: 100% does not. And yes, this still ignores the effects of flex-direction/flex-flow. – trysis Jun 10 '17 at 15:46

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