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What is the difference between categorical_accuracy and sparse_categorical_accuracy in Keras? There is no hint in the documentation for these metrics, and by asking Dr. Google, I did not find answers for that either.

The source code can be found here:

def categorical_accuracy(y_true, y_pred):
    return K.cast(K.equal(K.argmax(y_true, axis=-1),
                          K.argmax(y_pred, axis=-1)),
                  K.floatx())


def sparse_categorical_accuracy(y_true, y_pred):
    return K.cast(K.equal(K.max(y_true, axis=-1),
                          K.cast(K.argmax(y_pred, axis=-1), K.floatx())),
                  K.floatx())
  • Maybe this can help : stackoverflow.com/a/43546939/3374996 . Something to do with targets. I am not sure if by targets they mean the y_true, y_pred are sparse or the output of categorical accuracy is sparse. – Vivek Kumar Jun 11 '17 at 2:19
  • 1
    Pretty bad that this isn't in the docs nor the docstrings. – Denziloe Aug 4 '19 at 22:06
43

Looking at the source

def categorical_accuracy(y_true, y_pred):
    return K.cast(K.equal(K.argmax(y_true, axis=-1),
                          K.argmax(y_pred, axis=-1)),
                  K.floatx())


def sparse_categorical_accuracy(y_true, y_pred):
    return K.cast(K.equal(K.max(y_true, axis=-1),
                          K.cast(K.argmax(y_pred, axis=-1), K.floatx())),
K.floatx())

categorical_accuracy checks to see if the index of the maximal true value is equal to the index of the maximal predicted value.

sparse_categorical_accuracy checks to see if the maximal true value is equal to the index of the maximal predicted value.

From Marcin's answer above the categorical_accuracy corresponds to a one-hot encoded vector for y_true.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Aren't we passing integers instead of one-hot vectors in sparse mode? why then it takes the maximum in the line K.max(y_true, axis=-1) ?? :/ shouldn't there be only one value in y_true I mean? – leo Mar 23 at 15:58
68

So in categorical_accuracy you need to specify your target (y) as one-hot encoded vector (e.g. in case of 3 classes, when a true class is second class, y should be (0, 1, 0). In sparse_categorical_accuracy you need should only provide an integer of the true class (in the case from previous example - it would be 1 as classes indexing is 0-based).

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  • 2
    Was my answer helpful? – Marcin Możejko Jun 27 '17 at 9:40
  • 8
    It was useful for me :) – Jeru Luke Feb 28 '18 at 11:40
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    @MarcinMożejko I think you are wrong in your terminology - in sparse categorical accuracy you do not need to provide an integer - instead you may provide an array of length one with the index only - since keras chooses the max value from the array - but you may also provide an array of any length - for example of three results - and keras will choose the maximum value from this array and check if it corresponds to the index of the max value in y_pred – aviv Mar 31 '19 at 11:18
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    @aviv Follow up question - how is this different from just "accuracy"? Thanks. – user3303020 Apr 1 '19 at 15:21
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    @user3303020 when you tell keras to use "accuracy" keras is using the default accuracy which is categorical_accuracy – aviv Apr 3 '19 at 11:06
1
  1. sparse_categorical_accuracy expects sparse labels:
[[0], [1], [2]]

For instance:

import tensorflow as tf

sparse = tf.convert_to_tensor([[0], [1], [2]])
logits = tf.convert_to_tensor([[.8, .1, .1], [.5, .3, .2], [.2, .2, .6]])

sparse_cat_acc = tf.metrics.SparseCategoricalAccuracy()
sparse_cat_acc(sparse, logits)
<tf.Tensor: shape=(), dtype=float64, numpy=0.6666666666666666>
  1. categorical_accuracy expects one hot encoded input:
[[1., 0., 0.],  [0., 1., 0.], [0., 0., 1.]]

For instance:

onehot = tf.convert_to_tensor([[1., 0., 0.],  [0., 1., 0.], [0., 0., 1.]])
logits = tf.convert_to_tensor([[.8, .1, .1], [.5, .3, .2], [.2, .2, .6]])

cat_acc = tf.metrics.CategoricalAccuracy()
cat_acc(sparse, logits)
<tf.Tensor: shape=(), dtype=float64, numpy=0.6666666666666666>
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